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Discussion Starter #1
New to tractor work. I have a 1025r mmm, loader, boxblade (owned one year-put 100 hrs on it).
We had 5 acres just increased to 8 with purchase of a new barn and horse. 5 acres of pasture-some significant grade near the riding arena-acre of gravel drive and parking area.

Possibly acquiring 8 more acres next year or two.

I am looking at a used 5055e 4wd (100 hrs) with bush hog, hay spear and pallet forks for 28k or brand new 4044m same set up for 35k

It the 5055 too big for a tight barn, steep slope? Money is a factor but I can do either—open to other 30k options...thanks
 

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I went through about the same decision this last spring. We have 8 acres with 5 as a hayfield. We will not be expanding. We planned to take one acre of the hayfield and put in a different crop. One of the implements we would use is a mulch row layer. The one we were looking at required a 60hp tractor to pull it. So I decided to look at the 5065e. I really didn’t care for it. The operator station seemed almost as cramped as my current 790. I couldn’t imagine spending a long day in its seat. My salesman said the 5e series were built in India and one of the service techs just said they’re ok, an entry level tractor.

I decided to do more research on the mulch row layer and found for what I’m doing, a smaller unit would be better for me. It only required 35hp to pull it. So I started looking into a 4044. I found its operator station to be much more comfortable and the controls were easier to access. Since my 790 had an EZ park detachable loader that I used all the time, I felt it was an option I had to have. That meant going with a 4R rather than a 4M. The addition options on the R just make it that much nicer to operate. I use the hitch assist all the time. It’s so nice to be able to move the tractor forward or back and raise/lower the 3 pt from the rear fender.

Judging by the new price of the 4M, it’s probably an open station and not a cab. You don’t say what your intended use of the property is other than its pasture and with a horse. Are you going to cut/bale hay on some of it? Your end use of the property will figure into which tractor is best for you too.

Good luck.
 

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I went from a 5055E to a 4052R and am happy with it. The 5055E is a real category 2 tractor, but the majority of my work is category one and the 4052r excels in everything you want in a powerful compact tractor. It's maneuverable, doesn't tear up a yard (with the correct tires) and has good loader lift for it's weight. It's easy to operate which is a big deal if you have multiple operators with varying levels of experience. The 5055E has better power and lift, better hydraulics flow, and has the power to do real ground engaging work without compromise. It's not as well finished and operation requires more thought from the operator, both for it's safety and yours. It's a bull in a China shop inside most buildings.
 

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As Plug Ugly said, the 4 series will be much more maneuverable than the 5. You’re going from a 1 series, so either a 4 or 5 series are going to seem much bigger to you for awhile. I’ve had my 4044R for 4 months now and I’m finally getting used to it’s increased size over my previous 790 and the 790 is sized more like a 3 series.

Since you’re going to be moving round bales that probably weigh 750 lbs or so, make sure you use proper rear ballast. There’s a good thread that’s a Sticky under Implements and Attachments titled What is Rear Ballast and Why do you need it. If you left the brush hog attached when moving bales it would provide some ballast, but not enough.
 

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I went from a 1025R to a 4066R and it is, as was said previously, a very big difference. That being said, other than lift capabilities, you can pretty much do anything with a 4 series that you can do with a 5 series and some things you just cannot do with a 5 series as it is too big. Check my avatar showing a bale on front and rear of the tractor. Another important thing that most people don't think about: A 5 series is a cat 2 tractor. Cat 2 implement can run twice as much as a cat 1 implement.

Dave
 

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Another difference is the transmissions. Hydro is an option with the 4 series and is not an option with the 5 series.
 

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Will wheel weights or fluid filled tires provide enough ballast? I’ll check the sticky posts. Thanks
All 4 of my R4 tires are filled with Rimguard. I had the front ones filled for additional traction. If you look in the specification section of the loader manual, it will tell you the minimum ballast required for loader use. My 440R loader calls for fluid filled rear tires, no weights and an additional 800 lbs on the 3 pt. I think there are charts for forks and bale spears too. The loader specs should be similar for an M tractor, but check with your salesman.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hmmm. I will look at 3000s. Interesting. I’ve been told 4s are minimum requirement for found bales. Probably looking at 1000-1200# bales. Rough estimate. Could be more...thank you
 

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Hmmm. I will look at 3000s. Interesting. I’ve been told 4s are minimum requirement for found bales. Probably looking at 1000-1200# bales. Rough estimate. Could be more...thank you
Well, that's the thing with round bales, they vary greatly by weight, mostly a regional thing it seems. But for round bales that heavy then keep looking at the 4 series, and yes, you will still want rear ballast with that tractor.
 

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Hmmm. I will look at 3000s. Interesting. I’ve been told 4s are minimum requirement for found bales. Probably looking at 1000-1200# bales. Rough estimate. Could be more...thank you
1000-1200# bales are what is in my avatar as previously mentioned. Absolutely no problem handling them. Note that I have two on the tractor at the same time.

Dave
 

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My parents have a 4066r and some 6r, and almost everyone prefers using the 4 series over the 6. If you need the HP, lift capacity, GPM, or ground engagement capacity of the larger tractor then get it. But otherwise I’d chose the 4066r. The hydro transmission is one of the big reasons we prefer the 4 for mowing, tilling, box blading and loader work. We’ve been telling my dad for years, he should sell the 6 because it’s not needed anymore.


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My parents have a 4066r and some 6r, and almost everyone prefers using the 4 series over the 6. If you need the HP, lift capacity, GPM, or ground engagement capacity of the larger tractor then get it. But otherwise I’d chose the 4066r. The hydro transmission is one of the big reasons we prefer the 4 for mowing, tilling, box blading and loader work. We’ve been telling my dad for years, he should sell the 6 because it’s not needed anymore.


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Do they have a farm? I mean, in all fairness you are talking about two completely different tractors with two completely different roles.
 

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I traded my 5065e in after 3 years on a 4044m. I like the 5e, and it is a ton of tractor for the money. In terms of brute strength and mass there is no comparison between the 5e and the 3 or 4 series. However, if you do not need the mass and brute strength the majority of the time, consider another tractor. The 5e is not a nimble tractor to use in close confines. It is very heavy and with the standard R1 tires, destructive to all but the hardest ground. Maybe with R4 tires it would have been less so. Also consider your existing implement size. As wet as it was this year it would have spent the majority of the time sitting in the barn because it made such a mess of wet ground, which we have had a lot of lately.
 

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Do they have a farm? I mean, in all fairness you are talking about two completely different tractors with two completely different roles.
No they don't. My dad shouldn't have ever gotten the 6 series, since it's mostly just used to mow a 2000'x100' grass runway, and the occasional loader work. But IMHO the comparison is still useful because the 4 to 5 series transition where it goes from a "nimble" tractor to more of a heavy work horse for field work. The OP's stated uses all seem well within the capacity of a 4 series. I know everyone around these forms likes to push the go big attitude when buying a tractor. Sometimes it's warranted, but choosing a 5 series over a 4 series isn't the same amount of jump as going from a 1 to 2, 2 to 3, or 3 to 4.


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No they don't. My dad shouldn't have ever gotten the 6 series, since it's mostly just used to mow a 2000'x100' grass runway, and the occasional loader work. But IMHO the comparison is still useful because the 4 to 5 series transition where it goes from a "nimble" tractor to more of a heavy work horse for field work. The OP's stated uses all seem well within the capacity of a 4 series. I know everyone around these forms likes to push the go big attitude when buying a tractor. Sometimes it's warranted, but choosing a 5 series over a 4 series isn't the same amount of jump as going from a 1 to 2, 2 to 3, or 3 to 4.


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I agree completely with you on this, just curious why your parents would have a 6R, that's a LOT of tractor. :thumbup1gif:
 
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