Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Yesterday at the end of my job I noticed the High Exhaust Temp icon on the instrument panel. The message on the dash said to boost the rpms to 1500. I did that and let the tractor sit idling at 1500 rpm for over an hour and a half assuming the Automatic Exhaust Cleaning was processing Still the rpms stayed at 1500 and the High Exhaust Temp icon stayed on the instrument panel. So I said maybe I had to engage the Regen option, so I pressed that button and the Regen symbol appeared on the instrument panel, but the rpms still stayed at 1500 rpms instead of going to 2200 rpms like the manual said..

I thought after 20-40 minutes the tractor should have returned to a normal idle. What's going on?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
874 Posts
Engaging the Regen switch starts a Parked Regen. When the indicator light comes on and it requests to be set to 1500 RPM it is an Active Regen. You should be able to call up the soot percentage and see what it is. It’s going to take longer if the tractor is just sitting and not working. My tractor has performed an Active Regen 3 times in 200 hrs. It takes about 15-29 minutes, but I continue using it while it does it.

When it does complete the Regen, you have to lower the throttle. It doesn’t lower automatically.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
I'm at 50 hrs and only mid 40's on soot. I just run it at 2000 or more rpms all the time. While cutting the grass, I often actually finish with less soot level than when I started. I haven't had a regen light yet.

I'd suggest if you have some grass to mow, throttle her up and go to town. If you can run her at full load for like an hour, you should be fine. Also, even when just driving around the yard, try to keep the rpms set at least at 1500. will help keep the soot down
 

·
Old Pa-pa
Joined
·
11,936 Posts
What I've found out, if I want the regen to be done fairly quickly (Less than 30 minutes), I
just put it in high range C and run up and down the headlands a couple of miles, makes
it work harder.
You can really see the soot percentages drop quickly.

Just letting sit there at 1500 RPM can take way over an hour with the soot percentages
just slowly creeping down.

I've been using it for just loader and backhoe work, not really making it work hard.
Normally run 1500 to 1700 RPM for backhoe/loader work, soot percentages creep up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the input. I typically use the tractor for mowing pastures at 2600 rpm. But yesterday I had to hook up several different attachments so it idled quite a bit. I guess from now on I will idle it at 1500 rpm while hooking up those attachments.

By the way, after 2 hours at 1500 rpm the tractor idle speed automatically dropped down to a normal idle and the High Exhaust Temp light went out. This was only about 1/2 hour after pressing the Regen button. So idling at 1500 rpm for the first 1.5 hours without the Regen button pressed might be my mistake. Although the Owner's Manual implies I don't have to press the Regen button to clean the exhaust.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,202 Posts
Where is the Regen button? 5 1/2 years and 700 plus hours on my 4066R and I have never had to use such a thing. I can tell you that you can pretty much figure that when you need to use the Hitch Assist is when it will want to do a regen and the engine needs to be at idle to use Hitch Assist. Murphy's law.

Dave
 
  • Like
Reactions: wildbranch2007

·
Old Pa-pa
Joined
·
11,936 Posts
I can tell you that you can pretty much figure that when you need to use the Hitch Assist is when it will want to do a regen and the engine needs to be at idle to use Hitch Assist. Murphy's law.
Or when you been working all day and it's just after dark and ready to shut down for the day,
the sucker will decide go into regen mode.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
874 Posts
There are three types of Regen. I went through all of this when I bought my tractor a year ago. No one at the dealer gave me much information on how it worked. It took a lot of research and a few questions here to put my mind at ease. The system works fine if you let it.

Passive Regen. If you’re working the tractor hard enough, it burns soot while you’re working it. There is no indication that a Passive Regen is happening unless you happen to be watching the soot level and notice it’s decreasing. Although, on my 4044R, sometimes I can detect the motor sounds a bit different and there’s a slight burnt odor from the exhaust.

Active Regen. This when the indicator light comes on and it requests the RPM be set over 1500. If your using/working the tractor, the Active Regen will complete it’s cycle within 15-20 minutes. If it’s just sitting, it will take longer. You want to let the tractor perform the Active Regen if possible.

Parked Regen. The tractor will request the Parked Regen if you have not allowed it to perform the Active Regen or cancelled it. If it goes to long without being able to burn the soot out, then it has to at some point. There’s a procedure in the manual, but that’s when you push the button to enter a Parked Regen.

If you do not let the tractor do any of the Regen cycles, eventually it will shut down and it will mean an expensive service call to have the soot burned out at the dealer.

As I understand it, you always want to let the tractor perform the Active Regen. You want to avoid cancelling it unless it’s just not possible to perform it at that time. Parked Regen is there if you’ve had to cancel the Active Regen a few times and the tractor has to clean out the soot.

My 4044R has performed three Active Regens in 200 hrs. It is sitting at 77%, so it’s about to request the fourth. I don’t foresee a need for me to ever perform a Parked Regen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thanks Lee. That explains a lot. The Owner's Manual is confusing. Did me pressing the Regen button 1.5 hours into the Active Regen really do anything, or did the Active Regen really take 2 hours to complete just sitting there idling at 1500 rpm? What I don't understand is that after this 2-hour episode, the dash still says my Soot level is at 76%. I would have thought it would have decreased . . . unless it takes a little use of the tractor before the indicator shows that the Soot level has decreased.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
874 Posts
You’re right, the manual is confusing and what it does say is vague. My salesman gave me a printout of the DPF system and it was a little more clear, but not much. My question at the time was at what percentage level does it star Regen. It doesn’t say. After asking the question here, most said around 77%. I find that to be pretty accurate. Although, not set in stone.

My first Active Regen was at 77% when the tractor had 32 hrs. I was running the wood chipper at the time and since the RPM was at 2200, it just did it’s thing while we kept feeding the chipper. It was done in 15-20 minutes. The second Active Regen was at about 70 hrs but the soot level was at 84%. I just drove the tractor around without any load, but the RPM at 2200. It took about 35-40 minutes that time. After that I was working up a field, so it was being worked enough that the Passive Regen was activating. The soot level would climb as high as 48%, then lower slowly to 29%. This continued until the tractor had 170 hrs and then it went into Active Regen at 54% soot. I was mowing with the finish mower so it wasn’t being worked that hard, but the RPM was 2200. It probably took 35-40 minutes then too. At 210 hrs, it’s back up to 77%, so we’ll see how the next Active Regen works.

Each time it’s performed the Active Regen, it has lowered the soot level to 0%. If yours didn’t, then maybe it really didn’t do one. Maybe it got confused with pushing the Parked Regen button. There’s a procedure for it. I have never performed a Parked Regen and hope I never have to.

Parked Exhaust Filter Cleaning
If operator disregards indicators and continues to operate machine without allowing an automatic cleaning, engine performance is reduced. A parked exhaust filter cleaning procedure must be performed.
H94831

H94831-UN-13OCT09
Service Alert Indicator

H94828

H94828-UN-13OCT09
Exhaust Filter Cleaning Indicator

The following occurs when exhaust filter becomes restricted:
  • Service alert and exhaust filter cleaning indicators (on dash) are illuminated.
  • Engine power is reduced.
At this time, a parked exhaust filter cleaning is required.
Before a parked exhaust filter cleaning can be completed, the following criteria must be met:
  • Set engine rpm at low idle.
  • Coolant temperature must be above 60°C (140°F).
  • Transmission must be in neutral.
  • Zero ground speed commanded.
  • Park brake must be engaged.
  • PTO must be turned off.
  1. Select a suitable space to park the machine and lower all implements to the ground.
    No other machine functions can be used while exhaust filter cleaning is taking place with the machine parked. Excluded from this are functions that are required for an emergency shutdown of the machine.
    Do not start exhaust filter cleaning if the fuel gauge has been showing a low fuel level for a long time.
    Only stop engine if absolutely necessary due to heat build up in the engine compartment.


    LV17599

    LV17599-UN-29OCT13
    LV17600

    LV17600-UN-01MAY13

    A - Exhaust Filter Cleaning Switch
    B - High Exhaust Temperature Indicator
    C - Information Display
    D - Filter Cleaning Disable Switch

    Press and hold the exhaust filter cleaning switch (A) in the parked cleaning position for 5 seconds; LED above the switch will start blinking if all conditions are met. Release, then push for another 3 seconds; the icon should remain lit.

    If cancellation of a parked exhaust filter cleaning process is necessary, your best option is to push filter cleaning disable switch (D).
  2. During the parked cleaning process, the high exhaust temperature indicator (B) and the LED above the Exhaust Filter Cleaning Switch (A) illuminate.
  3. The engine speed elevates to 2200 rpm.
  4. When the parked cleaning process is complete, the LED above the Exhaust Filter Cleaning Switch turns off. High exhaust temperature indicator (B) remains on for 30 seconds after completion and the engine speed returns to low idle.
  5. If not returning machine to operation, allow engine time to return to normal operating temperature before stopping engine.
    After high exhaust temperature indicator (B) turns off, the system defaults to automatic exhaust filter cleaning mode and machine can be operated as normal.
If operator disregards indicators and continues to operate machine without allowing a parked cleaning, engine performance is reduced. A service exhaust cleaning procedure by a John Deere dealer is required.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks Lee. Yes, the High Exhaust Temp icon disappeared and the rpms automatically went to a normal idle, but the Soot Leved is still at 76%. So maybe it really didn't do a Regen but just cleaned out the exhaust? Anyway, thanks for the help. I guess I will wait until I get a "you have to do a Regen" symbol on the instrument panel, then do one.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
874 Posts
Again, if the white indicator comes on, you don’t have to do anything except make sure the RPM is above 1500. You don’t need to push a button or anything. The Active Regen is designed to cycle automatically without operator involvement. You can continue to use the tractor while the soot is being burned out. I watch my Soot percentage to see it go down and once it reaches 0%, shortly after the white indicator goes out and you can lower the RPM below 1500. It does not automatically adjust the RPM in Active Regen mode, only if you start a Parked Regen which you may have done. I know it’s confusing, but the next time the indicator comes on just let it do it’s thing. Don’t push the button!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Lee: If I started a Park ReGen when I pushed the button, that wasn't until after it had already been idling at 1500 rpm (with the High Exhaust Temp icon lit) for 1.5 hours. The confusing thing in all of this is why my Soot level is still at 76%. If when the High Exhaust Temp icon came on it started an Active ReGen, then shouldn't the Soot Level have dropped after the 2-hour process?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
874 Posts
I agree, something odd occurred with your Regen. 1.5 hrs seems like a really long time and yes, the soot level should have dropped. It might be worth questioning the service manager at your dealer.

When I bought my tractor in June 2019, the only thing the salesman said to me was to run this tractor hard so it keeps the soot burned out. Up until that moment I had never heard of Tier 4. I went back a couple weeks later and asked the service manager for some information because there wasn’t much on the web. He said the Tier 4 system works good and they haven’t had to service one yet, but he did suggest when its performing an Active Regen, to run the RPM at 2200 instead of 1500. He thought that might generate a little more heat and help the burn out. The only thing he seemed sure about was to not cancel a Regen request unless absolutely necessary. Just let it take care of itself automatically. I left that day feeling like maybe they didn’t know that much about it either. That’s when I joined GTT and posted my questions here. I got better answers here. It still feels a bit like a black box.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
I talked to the JD Service man. His comment when I told him the whole story was, "That's weird." Anyway, I will continue to operate the tractor and hope it does a normal ReGen at some point.

Thanks for all your help and advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
My salesman (FWIW) told me to never decline a regen request, because he had a customer who did repeatedly, and that guy wound up with a $5000 repair bill.

Ahh for the good old days when diesels could just run free.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
874 Posts
My salesman (FWIW) told me to never decline a regen request, because he had a customer who did repeatedly, and that guy wound up with a $5000 repair bill.

Ahh for the good old days when diesels could just run free.
That seems to be the consensus. I think the key word is “repeatedly“. You’re probably ok to cancel once in awhile if the conditions aren’t right, like you’re in tall dry grass. It seems they’ve designed the system to take care of itself automatically without operator involvement. I know when I had just bought my tractor and couldn’t find any info on the Regen process, I asked questions here. The basic answer from those who responded was don’t worry about it, it takes care of itself. Just let it run its cycle and don’t cancel it.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top