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Discussion Starter #1
My used snowblower had a bent impeller and huge gap between the impeller and housing so repairs were necessary.

While the impeller was out of the machine getting straightened, and the blower getting 5 new bearings:

I matched some cut steel for a backing, clamped it to the blade and drilled two holes per impeller blade, and reinstalled it into the blower.

Once in the blower, I cut rubber rectangles, matched them to the blade up tight to the housing, and marked the rubber through the drilled holes.

Using a punch, I punched holes in the rubber, sandwiched the rubber to the impeller with the cut steel and bolted them in with nylock nuts.

I ran the blower for about 3 minutes with no load to wear the paddles in.

Here are a few pics, pretty basic stuff. The machine works great now even though all I did was use it in a snow bank and some mud - snows melting fast in Massachusetts.






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Very interesting upgrade. IMHO I don't think the "plastic" type impeller in my 47 in would take the added bending moment and I'd end up with one or more stress fractured paddles. However I did buy a steel replacement second stage impeller and this well be added this summer. The rubber you used appears to be conveyer belt?
 

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Very interesting upgrade. IMHO I don't think the "plastic" type impeller in my 47 in would take the added bending moment and I'd end up with one or more stress fractured paddles. However I did buy a steel replacement second stage impeller and this well be added this summer. The rubber you used appears to be conveyer belt?
I used some worn out rubber paddles from my two stroke snow thrower. Thick reinforced rubber and probably easy enough to find at a power equipment shop if you don't have any. I did this mod 3 years ago to my ariens walk behind and it "turned it into a new machine."


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this upgrade has been for quite a while, look up "Clarence Kit" online, they sell these kits for walk-behind blowers. I've heard it really improves throwing distance and performance in wet snow, nice job!
 

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My 2 cents, more like 5 cents (sorry)

Have been looking at these threads and posts for years and finally stopped and chatted with the guys at the local Deere shop. For the most part have never had an issue, but every once in a while, the chute will clog in really wet stuff. so in talking with the parts guy he recommended trying Sno Jet spray polymer on the blower chute.

Well I figured for $12 I'd give it a go and if good enough for the chute, why not do the whole unit. That's what I ended up doing. So I applied to the chute, housing (inside and out), auger and 2nd stage impeller. Made a huge difference.

My thoughts on this is we are dealing with painted surfaces. Over time the paint finish is not as "slippery" as when new from the factory. The spray polymer actually binds itself to the surfaces where paint is in good shape and also to the areas that are bare metal. If you think of it that way it kind of makes sense that all those ice crystals we are trying to move around just want to stick to any cold metal surface.

The final thing is end of use clean up. Where the snow/ice builds up inside and outside of the unit, the material just slides right off rather than needing a hammer and chisel :) My next test will be to see if I can actually back down PTO RPM's when blowing or not. Oh and I applied to my back blade as well, same principle applies, make the metal surface more slippery.
 

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Why not just spray every surface on the snow blower in contact with snow with silicone? Some of the photos shown have a lot of rust where painted surfaces once was. If one takes more care of the unit and clean it up and apply fresh coats of paint the snow will be less apt to stick. Then apply silicon prior to snow blowing.

The rubber flaps is not necessary to rub against the snow blower housing. The idea is to make the blower more efficient not into a pump. Contact will just accelerate wear removing paint and wipe off the silicone. Resulting in even more rust.

Keep in mind snow sticking to the housing does the same thing as closing down the gap. Keep the raw metal free of rust and repaint in the off season as a part of normal maintenance.
 

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Keep in mind snow sticking to the housing does the same thing as closing down the gap. Keep the raw metal free of rust and repaint in the off season as a part of normal maintenance.
I too noticed that the OP's blower housing looked really rusty and scaly. I find that giving the inside of the impeller housing and chute a thick coat of fresh paint at the end of each season really helps with keeping things rust free. Sure some of the paint wears off during the season but the rust that accumulates is mostly surface rust that cleans right off.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
While I agree it needs paint, I have found on my walk behind that even when painted, the rubber paddles made a big difference.


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I guess its pretty much the same

Why not just spray every surface on the snow blower in contact with snow with silicone? Some of the photos shown have a lot of rust where painted surfaces once was. If one takes more care of the unit and clean it up and apply fresh coats of paint the snow will be less apt to stick. Then apply silicon prior to snow blowing.

The rubber flaps is not necessary to rub against the snow blower housing. The idea is to make the blower more efficient not into a pump. Contact will just accelerate wear removing paint and wipe off the silicone. Resulting in even more rust.

Keep in mind snow sticking to the housing does the same thing as closing down the gap. Keep the raw metal free of rust and repaint in the off season as a part of normal maintenance.
I guess whether you spray with silicone or the Sno Jet stuff, its about the same? Not sure which has the longer wear life. All I was trying to do was share with the OP my observations and thoughts. Honestly I had never given any thought to the slipperiness of the painted surfaces and how to improve the ability for the unit to do its job until recently.
 

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not sure

Is the Sno Jet the same as Meyer Snow Flow? or at least similar?
I am not sure ... I am no expert on that stuff am attaching a pic of what the stuff looks like. Of course just found this stuff on the net for like $7.00 a can ..
 

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Looks good! I'm wondering how high and how far was it throwing the snow? I plan on getting a front mount 54 but it has to throw it at least 6 ft high over a distance of 7 feet as my driveway is lined both sides from the house to the street with hedges.
 
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Snow is not going very far. You must have the throttle down about 2000 RPM.

I just came in from doing my drive and was throwing snow 3 times as far with throttle at 2700 RPM. The drifts were 4 feet high. It is 54" with plastic impeller 1023E and I run in LO range and just ease into the drifts. Back up and catch the spill over.

Only modification I did was change 40T sprocket for 36T.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
47" snowblower upgrade with rubber paddles

I had it up at the 5400rpm doing the first driveway for sure, and many of the other passes, so I'm not sure what the deal is. It had just rained so the snow was quite heavy. The chute wasn't in its most upward position though. Thoughts?


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