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Discussion Starter #1
I'm having trouble assembling the back end of my 49 Snowblower.

The issue is with the arrangement and connection of the IDLER PULLEY ARM and the arrangement of the BRACKET that holds the spring. The IDLER PULLEY ARM has a long bolt that goes thru the bushing and bolts on the other side with a lock washer and a nut. I"m using all grade 5 hardware. The issue is if you tighten the nut then the IDLER PULLEY ARM can't move freely. So I guess my question is that normal? It seems then you make a 1st time adjustment then tighten it down? Not sure. I have circled the bolt in question here. Also, I'm using the "upper" hole in the bracket. There is another hole below that I"m not using.

1.jpg

The other question is the bracket that is holding the spring on the left in the same picture above. When you tighten that down the bracket is pretty much loose and can move freely. I understand this. However, if that is the case where is the tension.


My second question relates to the way the hydraulic cylinder attaches to the "middle section" of the mount point and the blower housing. I have it "temporarily" attached as shown in the picture below. The "moving piston" side is attached at the mount while the stationary side is on the blower housing. The issue I see is the blower housing side is not a single hole but oblong. Also the hoses are laying to the left as opposed to the right if I had the cylinder flipped upside down.

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My last question pertains to the pivot bolt that pretty much secures the right side of the mount to the housing. The bushing is in the housing arm and there is no washer behind the hex portion of the cap nut. The washer is on the other side behind the nut. This seems correct as the JD parts website is not specifying a 2nd washer. Only one washer. I'm assuming this one washer is going behind the nut. I can put 2nd washer here, but it makes not sense.

4.jpg

I guess if someone can post some detailed pictures of their setup that would be phenomenal. The JD parts diagrams dosen't show how the entire thing really goes together.

Thanks
 

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I can get a couple pictures up soon to help with some of the visual stuff, but Ill try to explain a bit first.

1. Your idler pulley. That bolt should be tight. If it wont allow the idler to move freely, its likely the bushing is frozen to the outer tube of the idler pulley pivot. If thats the case, you will need to get it freed up for it to work properly. Either by pounding it out and replacing it, or by cranking it down and working it with a bit of heat and penetrating oil.
Its been a while since Ive had mine apart, there may be an inner sleeve thats frozen. JDParts should detail that.

2. You might need a picture for this, but you have the spring correctly attached. There is one more step to the tension part, and that is to flip the bracket on the left (the small one) around to the other side of its pivot. This will tension the spring.


3. Your cylinder is mounted backwards. The cylinders rod goes on the slot side so that the housing can "float" up when it hits something.

4. You want something there to keep it from pushing off of that side, or at least I think so. Ill get a picture of this and post it here.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I can get a couple pictures up soon to help with some of the visual stuff, but Ill try to explain a bit first.

1. Your idler pulley. That bolt should be tight. If it wont allow the idler to move freely, its likely the bushing is frozen to the outer tube of the idler pulley pivot. If thats the case, you will need to get it freed up for it to work properly. Either by pounding it out and replacing it, or by cranking it down and working it with a bit of heat and penetrating oil.
Its been a while since Ive had mine apart, there may be an inner sleeve thats frozen. JDParts should detail that.

2. You might need a picture for this, but you have the spring correctly attached. There is one more step to the tension part, and that is to flip the bracket on the left (the small one) around to the other side of its pivot. This will tension the spring.


3. Your cylinder is mounted backwards. The cylinders rod goes on the slot side so that the housing can "float" up when it hits something.

4. You want something there to keep it from pushing off of that side, or at least I think so. Ill get a picture of this and post it here.

Wow you helped me out a lot. So, after I posted this I went ahead and mounted the blower to the tractor and it did work. However I still had the frozen pulley pivot issue, but it still tensioned the belt.

So I took it off and I used heat and penetrating oil. I got the inner bushing out. I thought that bushing was pressed-in, I realized it's supposed to move freely. Now I cleaned up the rust with a wire wheel and used penetrating oil on the inside to remove the rust. I greased up the bushing and it's freely moving like butter!!!

So I now notice another thing about your picture and my setup. The bottom pulley, should the shaft be flush with the face of the pulley. It seems like your pulley is a "little bit" off the shaft. I have mine flush with the shaft. It seems since that bushing is free it dosen't matter because the pivot will move to adjust itself. In addition I notice a "hook" on the inside of the mount bracket. It seems if you push the tensioner pivot all the way and turn it it will enter this hook area. From there the plate that holds the spring is trapped behind the hook. Is this what that hook is for? Or is this a belt guide? Seems the belt would never enter that area...
 

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Wow you helped me out a lot. So, after I posted this I went ahead and mounted the blower to the tractor and it did work. However I still had the frozen pulley pivot issue, but it still tensioned the belt.

So I took it off and I used heat and penetrating oil. I got the inner bushing out. I thought that bushing was pressed-in, I realized it's supposed to move freely. Now I cleaned up the rust with a wire wheel and used penetrating oil on the inside to remove the rust. I greased up the bushing and it's freely moving like butter!!!

So I now notice another thing about your picture and my setup. The bottom pulley, should the shaft be flush with the face of the pulley. It seems like your pulley is a "little bit" off the shaft. I have mine flush with the shaft. It seems since that bushing is free it dosen't matter because the pivot will move to adjust itself. In addition I notice a "hook" on the inside of the mount bracket. It seems if you push the tensioner pivot all the way and turn it it will enter this hook area. From there the plate that holds the spring is trapped behind the hook. Is this what that hook is for? Or is this a belt guide? Seems the belt would never enter that area...
Good news on the pivot! Sometimes they are a royal pain to free up.

On the drive pulley, I actually installed the thrower and lined that up directly with the PTO pulley, thats why it sits where it does.
It can be off a bit, because its a belt, but I figured it wont hurt anything to be off a bit, and it might help the belt last longer. Its been that way for at least 10 years. The belt is the same one from long before I did that, so maybe there was no point to it. It sure made sense at the time, lol.
You are correct about the idler, it should move a bit to where it needs to.

Im not sure what you mean on the second part, regarding the hook on the mount bracket. On my picture, that opening is where the coupler joint is.
 

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Spring mounting: As long as the spring doesn't hit anything when it's applying tension to the belt, it's OK. If it does hit, simply reverse it!

Pivot bolt: the pivot bolt has 2 purposes in life, to allow the pulley to pivot in order to apply belt tension, and to allow the entire bracket to move forward and back. When you install/remove the 49, the pulley & bracket NEED to be moved forward. Release belt tension, remove belt, and slide pulley & bracket forward. This will allow the idler puller to then be rotated in front of the drive pulley and not hit the front frame of the tractor when you try to remove/install! It's a REAL pita if you don't get the idler out of the way...been there!

Jim, I've used ethanol gas since '82 with no problem, BUT, I use Stabil gas treatment! I had a log splitter that I had to remove & clean the carb every summer. Started using Stabil and never pulled the carb since I use it in 2-cycles also. I've got 2-cycle fuel that's 5+ years old...a few shakes, pour it in, a pull or 2 and I'm running!

EVERY can of fuel that I fill gets Stabil...except diesel! Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Good news on the pivot! Sometimes they are a royal pain to free up.

On the drive pulley, I actually installed the thrower and lined that up directly with the PTO pulley, thats why it sits where it does.
It can be off a bit, because its a belt, but I figured it wont hurt anything to be off a bit, and it might help the belt last longer. Its been that way for at least 10 years. The belt is the same one from long before I did that, so maybe there was no point to it. It sure made sense at the time, lol.
You are correct about the idler, it should move a bit to where it needs to.

Im not sure what you mean on the second part, regarding the hook on the mount bracket. On my picture, that opening is where the coupler joint is.
Ok, I've taken more pictures.

1.jpg

If you see the picture above there is a hook now. I'm pointing to it, but I guess I'm asking if that is a belt hook or a "spacer hook". It seems either the tension pulley plate should be behind it or in front of it. In that picture the plate is in front of it.

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In the picture above my bottom pulley (gearbox pulley) is mounted so that the pulley is flush with the shaft. As a result the white idler pulley is more forward. The idler pulley can't slide any more back because the plate is actually hitting the hook that I was referencing in the first picture. I believe that hook is very important in either it prevents the idler pulley from sliding too far back or the idler pulley plate is supposed to be behind it.

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In this 3rd picture I intentionally pulled the gearbox pulley far enough away so that it is in direct alignment with the idler pulley. However in this configuration, the gearbox pulley is pulled out a lot. You can see the hole in the center, that's how much shaft is missing as a result.

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In this picture, as a result of having the bottom pulley out that far, it seems that bottom plate of the idler pulley is touching that hook. Almost that hook is supposed to be some guard. Not sure.

Thank you everyone.
 

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I believe that hook is there to keep the pulley from sliding off the back, in which case you want to have the idler behind it.

That of course depends on the alignment of the PTO pulley and 49 drive pulley when its installed. As you have it now, it seems like it would be sitting fairly far back.
 

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Steppinthrax, The hook you're pointing to in your photo keeps the idler bracket in "rough alignment" with the pto & thrower drive pulley. The idler bracket will be behind it (towards blower housing) in the install/remove condition and in front (towards engine) when tensioning belt or running.

The first thing you need to do is get your pulley in the proper position.
1. Loosen setscrew in pulley and verify pulley moves on shaft. Remove/file/clean & lube if nec.
2. Move belt tension lever to release tension position. Slide idler bracket towards blower housing and move tension lever towards apply tension position...idler arm & pulley should now be between blower housing and drive pulley.
3. Mount thrower to tractor, align drive pulley to pto pulley, and tighten setscrew.
4.Install belt, move tension lever to release tension position, slide idler bracket & pulley towards engine, apply belt tension and...done!

Bob
 

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Steppinthrax, The hook you're pointing to in your photo keeps the idler bracket in "rough alignment" with the pto & thrower drive pulley. The idler bracket will be behind it (towards blower housing) in the install/remove condition and in front (towards engine) when tensioning belt or running.

The first thing you need to do is get your pulley in the proper position.
1. Loosen setscrew in pulley and verify pulley moves on shaft. Remove/file/clean & lube if nec.
2. Move belt tension lever to release tension position. Slide idler bracket towards blower housing and move tension lever towards apply tension position...idler arm & pulley should now be between blower housing and drive pulley.
3. Mount thrower to tractor, align drive pulley to pto pulley, and tighten setscrew.
4.Install belt, move tension lever to release tension position, slide idler bracket & pulley towards engine, apply belt tension and...done!

Bob
Bob, I’ve been running a 318/49 combo since 1987, and this is the first I’ve heard of that pulley having a different position for installation/removal and running.
Can’t say mine has ever moved from the pictured position, except when it was completely torn down for a repaint/rebuild.
Is this in the owners manual?
 

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Jim, I can't answer about owners manual...don't have one! I've been using my 49 on a 314 since about '83. A REAL pita to mount without moving the idler forward...jack & support front of tractor, slide thrower in, drop tractor!...until I stumbled across the sliding idler.

My 314 is a "closed frame", which means there's a piece of metal on the front connecting both side frame rails. THIS is where the problem is. Your 318 is "open frame." Remember, the 49 was built to go on a 140, also a "closed frame," so the sliding idler bracket was used to make mounting easier. Bob
 
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Ah, makes sense now! Thanks.
My 49 was bought new with a 312 that got traded in on the 318 by my Grandfather.
I never got to attach it to that one, and the 300 I had for a bit only wore the 54 blade.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Steppinthrax, The hook you're pointing to in your photo keeps the idler bracket in "rough alignment" with the pto & thrower drive pulley. The idler bracket will be behind it (towards blower housing) in the install/remove condition and in front (towards engine) when tensioning belt or running.

The first thing you need to do is get your pulley in the proper position.
1. Loosen setscrew in pulley and verify pulley moves on shaft. Remove/file/clean & lube if nec.
2. Move belt tension lever to release tension position. Slide idler bracket towards blower housing and move tension lever towards apply tension position...idler arm & pulley should now be between blower housing and drive pulley.
3. Mount thrower to tractor, align drive pulley to pto pulley, and tighten setscrew.
4.Install belt, move tension lever to release tension position, slide idler bracket & pulley towards engine, apply belt tension and...done!

Bob
Thanks for the Hook information. I think I'm on a good situation. I think I'm overthinking the main pulley position because it's a belt so if it's out a bit in or out it's dosen't matter too much.

On other positive about this is that this helped me realize that my 46" deck for the same tractor had another belt tensioning issue. So JD tends to re-use the same design on other parts. The Tensioner pulley arm for the belt had the same exact type of bushing as this blower. Well the bushing was SEIZED in the deck as well. As a result I simply tightened the tensioner and the belt just stayed on. I took the tensioner arm off and used heat o knock out the bushing. The old bushing was warped and seemed maybe worn out. So I ordered a new one. I now realize that this bushing needs to be setup the same as in my blower. I could never understand why the deck spring rubbed against the deck housing even though I had everything setup. It was because the bushing was too short and it never moved inside. So now hopefully this will help the deck...
 

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I'm glad you folks are having this conversation. I have a 49 snowblower scattered all over my garage (2 actually) that I'm rebuilding for the 318 I gave to my son. I was doing well on it before my wife became ill, so it's been a while. I've almost got it ready to paint, maybe another day or 2. The weather isn't cooperating around here.
 

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CT, The 49 is a fairly simple rebuild IF you can get it apart without damaging anything! The cam-lock bearings can take hours to remove instead of the minute or so they're designed for! A couple of quick comments:
1. Some people like to use a "speed up sprocket" to throw the snow farther. Ya might throw 2 or 3 feet farther, but it adds a LOT MORE strain on the gearbox gears, which are the weakest point and most difficult/expensive to replace!
2. JD recommends "Corn Head Grease" for the gearbox and that's what I've always used. It's supposed to get more fluid when it warms up and supplies better lubrication to the gears. I've never verified that. but that's what it's supposed to do!
3. Use a good quality chain lube on the drive chain. Chainsaw bar & chain lube will work, but needs several re-lubes per season. A motorcycle chain lube, available at most auto parts stores, adheres better and lubricates longer.
4. Use ONLY grade 5 bolts (1/4 x 1-1/4??) shear bolts. Also use self-locking nuts and snug but only until you can still rotate the shear bolt with your fingers. Locking them tightly changes the friction and the bolt doesn't shear when it should.
5. Add a "sacrificial material" to the bottom of your shoes. Mine were pretty worn when I got my 49 and I added 3 passes of weld...about 1/2". I could get about 3 seasons before I had to re-weld them.
6. Use "Pam" or any generic cooking spray in your discharge chute. Store it indoors, NOT next to your tractor...unless you've got heated garage! I good coating before you use the 49 does a lot to help prevent clogging. It also tends to make light snow go farther!

When I lived in CT, I bought a 314 and a 49 that came off of a 140. It was pretty sad to look at, but performed well. I used it for 20+years, replacing only a few bearings, 2 shear bolts, and 1 belt. A always ran WOT and adjusted my ground speed to maintain a full stream coming out of the chute. I'm now in TN and my 49 sits in a corner...feeling unwanted and neglected. Bob
 

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Thanks for all of those pointers, that is very helpful. I did manage to get one apart and get it ready for paint, I just need to pick up some hardener. I hadn't thought about welding strips on the shoes, that will be done before re-assembly. I'll keep an eye on this thread once I get back to working on it. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'm glad you folks are having this conversation. I have a 49 snowblower scattered all over my garage (2 actually) that I'm rebuilding for the 318 I gave to my son. I was doing well on it before my wife became ill, so it's been a while. I've almost got it ready to paint, maybe another day or 2. The weather isn't cooperating around here.
I posted a thread here a while back regarding my snowblower. I bought mine from NY and moved it here. It sat in the garage disassembled for a while. I might update the article. But the biggest problem it getting this thing disassembled are all the bearings that have been pressed onto the shaft. There's a long steel shaft running end to end. The bearings are pressed on each one. Depending on how poor it's been taken care of you will likely have to break out the torch.

This is my thread

JD Snowblower Model 49 Restoration

This is a cross reference for the bearings that can be purchased off-the-shelf instead of getting JD bearings. The same numbers here will also work for other brands.

bear.jpg
 

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Thank you for the link, that's helpful too. I did have to use the flame wrench but it didn't go too badly.
 

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I worked for 10+ years as a Maintenance Supervisor and was responsible for getting repair parts. I found getting part numbers cross referenced was easy, but I was also faced with "need" and often paid a premium price for "on the shelf parts." Now retired and living it TN, I need to travel 20 miles in several directions to get parts. I've got a bearing/parts distributor 20 mles south of me and JD, TSC, and Fastenal 20 miles north of me...so my decisions are based on $$$.

As a side note, well my 1st one, I ended up buying a floor press from either Harbor Freight or Northern Tool (forget which) and a split type bearing puller. Total price was around $230 and WELL worth it. If you plan of repairing anything with bearings, I highly recommend both items. Yeh, Harbor or Northern don't have the greatest quality, but for the amount of times you use them they're great.

My second note, and just a comment to CT. I lost my first 314 w/46, 49, 54, 80, and some other misc in a divorce. I bought another 314 w/46. I was still in CT and my cousin had a 49 he wasn't using...has a gravel driveway and just didn't like it! He lives just outside of Belfast, ME...a little (???) south east of you. I used to go there once or twice a year and we threw if in the back of my truck on one trip. So my 49 is from Maine! Bob
 

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I had a 49 blower on the 318, and loft height and distance was always a problem, but I had the short (18"?) chute, and noticed that other 49's could go further and higher. What I noticed was that those blowers had a longer (24"?) chute. I had a local sheet metal shop make a splice piece that I welded into the chute after I made a cut about 6" below the top end of the chute. I saw a noticeable difference without a major investment.

Dave
 
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