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I'm always on dirt, always on bumpy hillside/uneven terrain, almost always carrying near max loads of rocks and wood - probably 75% of the time. So, I haven't taken it out of 4WD for close to a year now. I like the "extra" feel. It feels safer, rather than waiting until it feels like I need it.

I keep the U-Joints lubed. But is this not good? If I don't really need 4WD, should I make a point of disengaging it?
 

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I would use as required, if in your case seems most of the time so be it, but I would take it out of 4x4 when possible.

Cuts down on wear on front end.....my .02$
 

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Your tractor, your rules. I agree with fdmars above. Just remember, the ground needs to be able to “give”, so the front wheels can slip, as they turn a little faster than the rears. We all would love to see some pictures of you, tractor and your place in Hawaii! I’ve only been to the islands once, 4yrs ago, but it was gorgeous, no matter which island I was on.

Just remember to keep the loader and front axle pivot pin well greased, since you are carrying near maxed out loads all the time. I’m glad to hear you are putting your tractor to good use instead of worrying about dirtying it up and getting scratches on it!
 

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As you know, there are few ways faster to lose control of a SCUT that to have the bucket loaded and traversing hills and NOT have the tractor in 4wd. Being on dirt and 4wd I don't feel is negative. As others have said, as long as the drive line is greased and you are on dirt, I don't see any problems with it. On pavement is another story due to the dramatic resistance during turns and the inability of the machine to ""shift / slide" on the pavement in the corners and turns and reduce the direct loads the pavement places on the drive line.

I know each of us in our own ways often worry about the fragility of our machines. In reality, many of the first 1 series machines are now starting to approach being a decade old and while the calendar is less important than the hour meter, it's still a testament to some degree to the toughness of these little tractors........

The mere fact you are thinking about the well being of your machine is a good thing and will likely help to reduce unnecessary wear and tear on the machine. For every GTTer who is posting about their machine and concerned about it's functional well being, there is likely the owner out there beating the snot out of their tractor without any concern and also probably very minimal maintenance and care. While most of us would hate to see such a thing, Deere has to build their machines knowing there is a segment of owners who will under care and over use these machines. Even with that possibility, you don't hear of major repairs or drive line failures of machines very often.

Think about how often the dealer service departments become aware of issues due to the group here on GTT. Whether it's the Air cleaner issue, the fuel tank filler neck rusting or other such issues, most of the "unique issues" seem to be disclosed here on GTT and I haven't seen or read of too many driveline failures on these machines. Yes, there is the occasional leaking seal, etc. but overall, the drive line and its components have been quite reliable from what I can see, which is great. A combination of good maintenance and proper operation will likely keep these machines humming for many, many years largely trouble free (at least that is my optimistic outlook....):good2:
 

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Unless you can feel the front end binding of fighting itself you’re fine to be in 4wd. When in doubt run it in 4wd. I don’t recommend doing a lot of tight turns on pavement when in 4wd.

I do the same thing with my pickups. Even on pavement. Unless your doing a lot of tight turns your not going to hurt anything. Useing 4wd will cause tires to wear faster. Back whe I was a kid we would pull chopper boxes on the road with the truck in 4H because if you used 2wd the truck would spin when you would start out. Some of the pickups we had back then were full time 4wd.
 

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As others have said, as long as the drive line is greased and you are on dirt, I don't see any problems with it.
The front driveshaft on these tractors spins the same whether you are in 2WD or 4WD.
 

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Lot's of opinions on 4wd on or off. I personally leave mine engaged all the time. I'm never on pavement though. Gravel driveway,lawn or woods only and of course lot's of snow.
 

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I'm always on dirt, always on bumpy hillside/uneven terrain, almost always carrying near max loads of rocks and wood - probably 75% of the time. So, I haven't taken it out of 4WD for close to a year now. I like the "extra" feel. It feels safer, rather than waiting until it feels like I need it.

I keep the U-Joints lubed. But is this not good? If I don't really need 4WD, should I make a point of disengaging it?
With all the hauling you do maybe a skid loader is what you really need. I look at my tractor as a jack of all trades. Cut grass, move snow, dig an occasional stump, future box blade use and moving a few piles of pit run rock a year. I would always use 4WD if I was doing what you do.
 

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Yes

I'm always on dirt, always on bumpy hillside/uneven terrain, almost always carrying near max loads of rocks and wood - probably 75% of the time. So, I haven't taken it out of 4WD for close to a year now. I like the "extra" feel. It feels safer, rather than waiting until it feels like I need it.

I keep the U-Joints lubed. But is this not good? If I don't really need 4WD, should I make a point of disengaging it?[/QUOTE]

Yes. It's slightly less strain on the drive train. In addition, you want to make sure the linkage doesn't freeze up due to no movement.

My 790 stays on dirt 99% of the time and I run 2 wd 80% of the time. The terrain is not hilly so I use 4wd only for mud, snow, heavy pulls, loader work if needed. I will use it on a hillside if there's any chance of sliding but normally I'm 2wd.

If it makes you feel safer, use it but do take it out of 4wd when it's clearly not needed.

Treefarmer
 

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Always on here except when pulling onto my pavement to park in the garage.

If someone were to tell me that my tractor wasn't built for that, you would see it in the classifieds immediately.
 

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Always on here except when pulling onto my pavement to park in the garage.

If someone were to tell me that my tractor wasn't built for that, you would see it in the classifieds immediately.
When you look at the tiny little 3/4" diameter shaft stub coming out of the transmission, the loose fitting U-joint yoke and U-joints with no grease zerks it does make you wonder what it was built for. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
When you look at the tiny little 3/4" diameter shaft stub coming out of the transmission, the loose fitting U-joint yoke and U-joints with no grease zerks it does make you wonder what it was built for. :)
This is exactly why I asked the question. I was reading about all the concern regarding that issue on the smaller JD tractors. And I wondered if full time 4WD would only add to this worry. But a comment further up says that shaft is turning no matter what - albeit with no load I guess - but I didn't know what others do when never on pavement, but also rarely on level ground.
 

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This is exactly why I asked the question. I was reading about all the concern regarding that issue on the smaller JD tractors. And I wondered if full time 4WD would only add to this worry. But a comment further up says that shaft is turning no matter what - albeit with no load I guess - but I didn't know what others do when never on pavement, but also rarely on level ground.
I have a 2720 and only have it in 4WD when extra traction or braking is needed. Needless to say I was a bit disappointed when I first looked under the tractor and saw that tiny pencil-like driveshaft going to the front axle. Then again, it **ONLY** costs $866 to replace (only available as a whole unit). :)
 

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It might only be 3/4” but the main shaft going into the transmission on my super duty is about 1-1/8” if I remember what I read correctly. Of course that is a lot more meat but in terms of power and weight there is more than a lot more.
 

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It might only be 3/4” but the main shaft going into the transmission on my super duty is about 1-1/8” if I remember what I read correctly. Of course that is a lot more meat but in terms of power and weight there is more than a lot more.
Right. The point of engineering is to have enough meat to reliably perform the task, but not too much as that is wasteful.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I vote not a problem leaving it in MFWD.
As others mentioned you may have shorter front tire life due to the "lead" of the front axle, even only off road. I price I could live with. :hi:

I sure wish my 2030 had MFWD :flag_of_truce::greentractorride:
 

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I run 2 wd 80% of the time. The terrain is not hilly so I use 4wd only for mud, snow, heavy pulls, loader work if needed. I will use it on a hillside if there's any chance of sliding but normally I'm 2wd.

If it makes you feel safer, use it but do take it out of 4wd when it's clearly not needed.

Treefarmer
I'm like Treefarmer.
I use mine in 2wd all the time till the 2wd is having issues then I'll shift into 4wd only as long as it takes to do what the 2wd couldn't do then its back to 2wd.
I'll bet I'm 95% 2wd-5% 4wd.

Its silly to use the 4wd when its not needed.
Its like using the wipers on your car when its not raining.
 

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I'm like Treefarmer.
I use mine in 2wd all the time till the 2wd is having issues then I'll shift into 4wd only as long as it takes to do what the 2wd couldn't do then its back to 2wd.
I'll bet I'm 95% 2wd-5% 4wd.

Its silly to use the 4wd when its not needed.
Its like using the wipers on your car when its not raining.
May be silly in your environment/terrain but when I had my 1025 with R4's if it wasn't in 4wd when I was mowing around my house, I could have a run away down my hill towards my pond. No just casually reaching down for 4wd lever. I did it twice and both times I was lucky I didn't end up in the drink, or worse, flipping over and over again. I just left it in 4wd. Too easy to forget to check. Or driving down hill in the woods with a load in the bucket and loosing rear traction because 4wd wasn't engaged and QUICKLY running into a tree...etc.

If my land was flat, then yeah it would be silly to just ride around in 4wd, But on hilly terrain it's just too easy to forget MFWD. I'll buy front tires when they wear out. No big deal.
 

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May be silly in your environment/terrain but when I had my 1025 with R4's if it wasn't in 4wd when I was mowing around my house, I could have a run away down my hill towards my pond. No just casually reaching down for 4wd lever. I did it twice and both times I was lucky I didn't end up in the drink, or worse, flipping over and over again. I just left it in 4wd. Too easy to forget to check. Or driving down hill in the woods with a load in the bucket and loosing rear traction because 4wd wasn't engaged and QUICKLY running into a tree...etc.

If my land was flat, then yeah it would be silly to just ride around in 4wd, But on hilly terrain it's just too easy to forget MFWD. I'll buy front tires when they wear out. No big deal.


Treefarmer said it best "If it makes you feel safer, use it but do take it out of 4wd when it's clearly not needed."

I said the following "Its silly to use the 4wd when its not needed."

Your saying you need it, so use it. Sounds like your agreeing with and doing what Treefarmer and I said.
 

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I'm like Treefarmer.
I use mine in 2wd all the time till the 2wd is having issues then I'll shift into 4wd only as long as it takes to do what the 2wd couldn't do then its back to 2wd.
I'll bet I'm 95% 2wd-5% 4wd.

Its silly to use the 4wd when its not needed.
Its like using the wipers on your car when its not raining.
May be silly in your environment/terrain but when I had my 1025 with R4's if it wasn't in 4wd when I was mowing around my house, I could have a run away down my hill towards my pond. No just casually reaching down for 4wd lever. I did it twice and both times I was lucky I didn't end up in the drink, or worse, flipping over and over again. I just left it in 4wd. Too easy to forget to check. Or driving down hill in the woods with a load in the bucket and loosing rear traction because 4wd wasn't engaged and QUICKLY running into a tree...etc.

If my land was flat, then yeah it would be silly to just ride around in 4wd, But on hilly terrain it's just too easy to forget MFWD. I'll buy front tires when they wear out. No big deal.
Treefarmer said it best "If it makes you feel safer, use it but do take it out of 4wd when it's clearly not needed."

I said the following "Its silly to use the 4wd when its not needed."

Your saying you need it, so use it. Sounds like your agreeing with and doing what Treefarmer and I said.
Well, I just read another thread, I'm definitely in the" use when needed camp." I also don't see what is so hard about flipping a lever in and out when needed, no offense to anyone in particular but I kind of agree with the wipers on all the time theory.
 
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