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Discussion Starter #1
To preface this post, I've had my 1026r for a little over 5 years and have had very few issues. I've never really put it in 4WD as most of my work involved situations where I did not want to tear up turf with the front wheels. Tractor has about 200 hours on in it.

Earlier this week, I went to bring the tractor out of the shed and haul a small trailer up to the house. Yes, we have snow here in the winter and I wanted to put the tractor in 4wd to insure that it would make it up the rather steep hill with the trailer in about 6 inches of snow. When I went looking for the lever, the tip was barely visible and, when I grabbed it, the lever fell off. Once I found it, I discovered that the weld to the small bracket wasn't really there. It was a bad weld. It's obvious too, there's rust on about 75% of the surface so it was barely hanging on even when I bought the tractor.

I couldn't even figure out what it was supposed to look like so I used Google to find the right part numbers. I found one ( labeled "european" ) and it seemed fairly cheap and it showed the small bracket ( and pin ) that this was supposed to be attached to. Great. Now I just take that to the service department and they can order. Wrong.

The dealer service department couldn't do anything for me as far as ordering a new part free of charge because the tractor was too old. Even it was an obvious defective part. That an the "european" level is different ( not sure how ) from the one for the US ( which I could never find ) and the US one, rather than being realistic in price, is over a HUNDRED DOLLARS. For a piece of thick steel rod with a bracket welded on the bottom.

So does anyone know what the difference is between a "european" 4wd lever and the US one? Does it route differently on a european 1026r? Or is this John Deere's US markup?

Thanks.
 

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Perhaps a European GTT member can get the info you are looking for. While you wouldn't think THAT part would be different, one never knows where all the build differences are.

Can you post a photo of your broken lever? Since it appears to be all steel perhaps the best approach would be to simply re-weld it. Even if you don't weld it yourself I doubt it would cost much for a local shop to do it. I've had similar small pieces rewelded and it usually isn't more than $20 or so - and you end up with a part that is stronger than the original.

Is #2 below the lever you are referring to? It sure looks like it would be easy to weld, especially TIG weld.

1026R_4WD.jpg

As you can see, the European version is shaped completely different.

1026R_4WD_EU.jpg

Even so... $104 for the U.S. part and $37 for the European part seems crazy. Maybe the U.S. one is made from the all-too-common steel-like Unobtanium? :)

I assume the lever slides onto #8 below.

1026R_4WD_shaft.jpg

Anyway, some photos would sure help not only those of us in the U.S. but any European readers who are trying to make a comparison.
 

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To preface this post, I've had my 1026r for a little over 5 years and have had very few issues. I've never really put it in 4WD as most of my work involved situations where I did not want to tear up turf with the front wheels. Tractor has about 200 hours on in it.

Earlier this week, I went to bring the tractor out of the shed and haul a small trailer up to the house. Yes, we have snow here in the winter and I wanted to put the tractor in 4wd to insure that it would make it up the rather steep hill with the trailer in about 6 inches of snow. When I went looking for the lever, the tip was barely visible and, when I grabbed it, the lever fell off. Once I found it, I discovered that the weld to the small bracket wasn't really there. It was a bad weld. It's obvious too, there's rust on about 75% of the surface so it was barely hanging on even when I bought the tractor.

I couldn't even figure out what it was supposed to look like so I used Google to find the right part numbers. I found one ( labeled "european" ) and it seemed fairly cheap and it showed the small bracket ( and pin ) that this was supposed to be attached to. Great. Now I just take that to the service department and they can order. Wrong.

The dealer service department couldn't do anything for me as far as ordering a new part free of charge because the tractor was too old. Even it was an obvious defective part. That an the "european" level is different ( not sure how ) from the one for the US ( which I could never find ) and the US one, rather than being realistic in price, is over a HUNDRED DOLLARS. For a piece of thick steel rod with a bracket welded on the bottom.

So does anyone know what the difference is between a "european" 4wd lever and the US one? Does it route differently on a european 1026r? Or is this John Deere's US markup?

Thanks.
Sorry to hear of your troubles. And, Welcome to the GTT community.

I will go over to the John Deere parts site and look this up for you and return here and post a link to the actual page in this thread, assuming someone doesn't beat me to it. We have a bunch of talented search artists for John Deere parts and diagrams......

I will post as soon as I find it..Be back shortly.

Check this link....It's for the Worldwide Machine, not the European.....

http://jdpc.deere.com/jdpc/servlet/com.deere.u90490.partscatalog.view.servlets.HomePageServlet_Alt


It's part number LVA16111 and it's called an "Arm.


 

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Greenparts has LVA16611 at a cost of $104.78

https://www.greenpartstore.com/John-Deere-Arm--LVA16611_p_156529.html

Check on Ebay as well.

While it looks like a simple arm, the bends are probably important for making it fit and function correctly.

What about cleaning up the parts from your tractor and having a local welder weld it back together? That's what I would do if you can locate the pieces.....Then, the weak weld issue will be resolved and perhaps the local welder can strengthen the weak point with a support. Probably just a good weld is all you will need, especially if you haven't used it that much.

Whether you get a new part or fix the old one, Please make sure to let us know what you end up doing and how it turns out. It's helpful for anyone else who searches this site and maybe having a problem with the same shifter rod..........Thanks......and looking forward to hearing how you resolve this problem.
 

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Question, can you remove the lever and have it re-welded? :unknown:

Opps! jgayman beat me to it.
That was going to be my question.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have to remove the old "bracket" to see if it is obvious on how to re-weld. I have plenty of folks that can do it but I am worried that it is a "positional" thing. The 2 part numbers I found were LVA17697 ( European/Worldwide ) and LVA16611 ( US ). The dealer did order the US version and they also confirmed the price difference. Even if the lever is a different shape, hard to believe that it costs $70 more to bend it for the US than for Worldwide. Everything else is the same here except the shape. I'll include a picture of the end when I get a chance.
 

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I have to remove the old "bracket" to see if it is obvious on how to re-weld. I have plenty of folks that can do it but I am worried that it is a "positional" thing. The 2 part numbers I found were LVA17697 ( European/Worldwide ) and LVA16611 ( US ). The dealer did order the US version and they also confirmed the price difference. Even if the lever is a different shape, hard to believe that it costs $70 more to bend it for the US than for Worldwide. Everything else is the same here except the shape. I'll include a picture of the end when I get a chance.
If it's like most of the broken welds I've seen you should be able to see exactly how the two parts previously fit together. I thought perhaps the European lever came out at a different place on the floor but I just looked at both the U.S. and European operator's manual and they both show the same photo of the lever. Which of course further enhances the mystery. It doesn't matter anyway because you cannot order European parts in the U.S. (from a JD dealer anyway).



Regardless of whether you have yours welded or buy a new lever, be sure to use a NEW roll pin when you reassemble it. It is p/n 34M7033 and it's only $0.44. Now here is something crazy, the European lever uses the same LVU22931 handle but uses a different part number for the roll pin (34M7141) even though both roll pins are spec'd as 5 x 30mm. The European pin also costs twice as much at $0.85. So see... JD is gouging you on the lever and gouging the Europeans on the pin. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
yeah, I would much rather get gouged on the pin, I've got that change in my couch. I already had the dealer order the part but will probably see if I can get the old one welded. Whomever welded the first one really sucked at it, I've attached a picture.
 

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Understand that things are not made like things used to be.

Just weld the thing back together and enjoy use of you tractor.

Spend the 100 buck towards a mig welder as I’m sure that would be a better investment when owning equipment made today.

Be sure that’s not the only thing to fix in the future.

My mig welder has paid for it’s self time over time.

Same can be said for compressor and air tools.

Without them you will be molested for replacement parts.
 

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I had a "kindergarten weld" cost me $400 on the rod that aligns the PTO/mower coupling. I think it's pretty cool how they time the welding to when the warranty will run out... One little bum weld here and there is sure a $ maker for JD. (And I can't prove it's not intentional!:nunu:)
 
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When you re-install the lever, be sure to feed a piece of safety wire (like they utilize on aircraft engine) through, around the roll pin, and twist it together. The roll pins are known to vibrate out. The safety wire will prevent that.
 
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