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Anyone know if a new snowblower would come with extra shear pins on them somewhere? I thought I read on the forum one time that there was? Tried to do a quick search and couldnt find anything. Was hopin for a quick answer here. But i guess i can check the manual. Wanted to know bfore I start removing the covers.


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They are not a pin, but rather a 1/4" bolt. The blowers come with a row of spares bolted into the rear of the main housing, just below the chute.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks!! Im assuming thats what these are?



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correct
 

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Anyone know if a new snowblower would come with extra shear pins on them somewhere? I thought I read on the forum one time that there was? Tried to do a quick search and couldnt find anything. Was hopin for a quick answer here. But i guess i can check the manual. Wanted to know bfore I start removing the covers.


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Make sure if you ever shear a pin, which does happen, that you only replace it with a comparable "Soft" bolt of the same length, material grade and hardness. Also, never substitute any other type of item such as a clevis pin, etc. for the shear pin as the material grade may be very different and the pin won't break when needed to prevent further damage.

The head of the shear pin bolt indicates it's hardness and shear pins are usually at the soft end of the spectrum so they can break when under excessive loads. When replacing them, make sure to keep the replacements equally soft to preserve the machine through these events.

The shear pins serve a very important function and shearing them prevents serious damage to other more expensive and robust components. Breaking shear pins can occur more often in conditions of ice or when the snow has thawed and refroze or when there is ice involved in the storm. Rarely will just heavy volumes of snow break a shear pin.

I can't tell you how many times I have heard people who have broken more than one shear pin say "I need to find better shear pins", which are often nothing more than non hardened bolts, typically 1/4 inch. This is a terrible idea. The shear pins serve a critical function and you may experience conditions where you might shear pins seemingly often, but those conditions tend to come and go and it's not the norm to break these often.

Last winter, I had a piece of ice that made it past the main auger on the 47" blower, did not break any shear pins and damaged the main impeller, which on the 47" two stage blower is made of heavy steel. The ice actually bent the flange on one of the impeller's auger out of position by over 1", effectively taking the pitch out of it and straightening it. I had to take the impeller out of the blower and heat the bent vane red hot with a cutting torch to be able to re-position it to restore balance to the impeller, otherwise, the machine would shake violently when running. So damage can still occur to blower components when the shear bolts don't break.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Got it! Thanks everyone!


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Make sure if you ever shear a pin, which does happen, that you only replace it with a comparable "Soft" bolt of the same length, material grade and hardness. Also, never substitute any other type of item such as a clevis pin, etc. for the shear pin as the material grade may be very different and the pin won't break when needed to prevent further damage.

The head of the shear pin bolt indicates it's hardness and shear pins are usually at the soft end of the spectrum so they can break when under excessive loads. When replacing them, make sure to keep the replacements equally soft to preserve the machine through these events.

The shear pins serve a very important function and shearing them prevents serious damage to other more expensive and robust components. Breaking shear pins can occur more often in conditions of ice or when the snow has thawed and refroze or when there is ice involved in the storm. Rarely will just heavy volumes of snow break a shear pin.

I can't tell you how many times I have heard people who have broken more than one shear pin say "I need to find better shear pins", which are often nothing more than non hardened bolts, typically 1/4 inch. This is a terrible idea. The shear pins serve a critical function and you may experience conditions where you might shear pins seemingly often, but those conditions tend to come and go and it's not the norm to break these often.

Last winter, I had a piece of ice that made it past the main auger on the 47" blower, did not break any shear pins and damaged the main impeller, which on the 47" two stage blower is made of heavy steel. The ice actually bent the flange on one of the impeller's auger out of position by over 1", effectively taking the pitch out of it and straightening it. I had to take the impeller out of the blower and heat the bent vane red hot with a cutting torch to be able to re-position it to restore balance to the impeller, otherwise, the machine would shake violently when running. So damage can still occur to blower components when the shear bolts don't break.
The second stage impellers are now plastic.
 

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The second stage impellers are now plastic.
You can replace the plastic... err... um... I mean "poly" impeller with a steel impeller for ~$250.
 

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You can replace the plastic... err... um... I mean "poly" impeller with a steel impeller for ~$250.
Hopefully, I'll never find out. Hind sight being 20-20, I should have kept my 46 Snow Throwers and changed out the upstop, driveshaft. and added line extenders. I like the way it operated better than the 47. Less moving parts to fail, as well.
 

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my 54" blower has a plastic impeller probably made from recycled hair brushes, gives me that warm and fuzzy feeling whenever it spits out an ice chunk, bought in 2015. Yes, always replace a broken shear bolt with the correct one, or you can kiss your gearbox goodbye
 

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my 54" blower has a steel impeller, bought in 2015. Yes, always replace a broken shear bolt with the correct one, or you can kiss your gearbox goodbye
I bought my 54" blower new in 2013 and it had a plastic impeller. Are you sure the blower was new or that the impeller had not been swapped out previously? I have never seen a 54" front-mount blower come from the factory with a steel impeller. The parts manuals also only shows a plastic impeller.

The only source for steel impellers is to use the part from an older 47" front blower.
 

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my 54" blower has a steel impeller, bought in 2015. Yes, always replace a broken shear bolt with the correct one, or you can kiss your gearbox goodbye
I bought my 54" blower new in 2013 and it had a plastic impeller. Are you sure the blower was new or that the impeller had not been swapped out previously? I have never seen a 54" front-mount blower come from the factory with a steel impeller. The parts manuals also only shows a plastic impeller.

The only source for steel impellers is to use the part from an older 47" front blower.
Never mind, you're right, it is plastic, I was in my shop and checked. I was thinking of the impeller on my walk-behind blower.

Great... I guess I can look forward to replacing that at some point.
 
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Last winter, I had a piece of ice that made it past the main auger on the 47" blower, did not break any shear pins and damaged the main impeller, which on the 47" two stage blower is made of heavy steel. The ice actually bent the flange on one of the impeller's auger out of position by over 1", effectively taking the pitch out of it and straightening it. I had to take the impeller out of the blower and heat the bent vane red hot with a cutting torch to be able to re-position it to restore balance to the impeller, otherwise, the machine would shake violently when running. So damage can still occur to blower components when the shear bolts don't break.[/QUOTE]

Ouch! There's no shear protection on the 2nd stage?? That's terrible.
 

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Never mind, you're right, it is plastic, I was in my shop and checked. I was thinking of the impeller on my walk-behind blower.

Great... I guess I can look forward to replacing that at some point.
Thank you for checking. You never really know these days. The plastic impeller will probably last a long time. The primary complaints with it were less than expected throwing distance.
 

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Ouch! There's no shear protection on the 2nd stage?? That's terrible.
To add to what the previous poster stated, the impeller shear bolt is shown circled below.

Impeller_maint.jpg
 

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So damage can still occur to blower components when the shear bolts don't break.
I'll pass along a maintenance tip that I discovered while swapping impellers.

The impeller is supposed to spin freely on the shaft that runs through it. There are steel bushings of sorts inside the impeller. The only thing that actually "drives" the impeller is part #3 which is secured with a key to the central shaft. The impeller is secured to #3 with a shear bolt (circle below). When the shear bolt breaks the impeller then spins freely on the central shaft.

I discovered that after only one season and despite being stored in the garage my impeller was starting to rust fast to the shaft (see arrow below). I can only image how bad it gets after several years. If the impeller does not spin freely on the shaft the shear bolt won't break and you could risk damaging the gear box. It's a good idea to put a little Never Seize or similar on the impeller bushings to ensure they do not rust fast to the shaft.

The same is true for the auger shafts. There are grease fittings on each side to keep the auger tubes lubed on the auger shaft but it is a good idea to periodically remove the two auger shear pins when you grease the auger and spin the auger to ensure it spins freely and the grease gets distributed.

Impeller_maint.jpg
 

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So damage can still occur to blower components when the shear bolts don't break.
I'll pass along a maintenance tip that I discovered while swapping impellers.

The impeller is supposed to spin freely on the shaft that runs through it. There are steel bushings of sorts inside the impeller. The only thing that actually "drives" the impeller is part #3 which is secured with a key to the central shaft. The impeller is secured to #3 with a shear bolt (circle below). When the shear bolt breaks the impeller then spins freely on the central shaft.

I discovered that after only one season and despite being stored in the garage my impeller was starting to rust fast to the shaft (see arrow below). I can only image how bad it gets after several years. If the impeller does not spin freely on the shaft the shear bolt won't break and you could risk damaging the gear box. It's a good idea to put a little Never Seize or similar on the impeller bushings to ensure they do not rust fast to the shaft.

The same is true for the auger shafts. There are grease fittings on each side to keep the auger tubes lubed on the auger shaft but it is a good idea to periodically remove the two auger shear pins when you grease the auger and spin the auger to ensure it spins freely and the grease gets distributed.

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That's great advice on keeping the impeller and auger moving freely. I think I will remove the shear bolt on the impeller once a season and blast some penetrant into those bushings and make sure it spins freely.
 
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