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After searching for a year for a "good deal" on a snowblower, I found both a used 4 foot Box Blade and a "new in the crate"
54 inch Snow blower. I had to make 2 trips, 80+ miles (ONE WAY) to a distant JD Dealer over in Wisconsin.
Originally, I was going to buy just the box blade and had just enough room in my Suburban to haul it home.
When the salesman started talking about snowblowers and his price was $950 less than my local dealer, I dragged out the check book and made what I thought was a good deal.
The second day I brought along my trailer to pick everything up at once. It's the first week of August and the wind is howling 30 MPH and it's raining with temps in the 50's. It's Wisconsin!
Anxious to get things loaded and get home with my new attachments, I believed the salesman when he said "you're all set to blow snow, when it comes".
When I got home, I tore what was left of the cardboard away from the soaking wet pallet to find a bare snowblower.
After a few calls to the dealership, I got someone to realized that I'm missing things.
One week later, the salesman delivers 5 more boxes of parts to my house. THANK YOU.
After opening and inventorying all the parts & bags, I realized there are NO instructions and NO Operator Manual.
More phone calls to the dealership, a week later a Operators Manual shows up in the mail.
I'm slowly assembling components but
Not happy with the following
1. M12, 10.9 ALL THREAD bolts to fasten various parts to the frame that has 1/2 inch holes where I think they should be correct sized and shouldered bolts.
2. I got what appears to be "a grab bag" of random 12 M bolts, some 3 inches long for something that needs an 1 1/2inch bolt. All in original sealed JD bags.
3. I haven't been able to find any info on where the various wires & a stinger that I got, should go?
Anyone have thoughts and information/diagrams on wiring a 54 inch blower to a 1026R I'd sure appreciate it.
Thanks
 

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I picked up my snowblower the other day and yep, a half dozen or so other boxes. I haven't turn into it yet.

However, this is the online manual for mine and it has assembly instructions. I assume they're very similar if not the same.

I hope it helps!


OMM161544_H9
 

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Parts diagrams

One can waste time and accumulate frustration by trying to assemble something with the wrong parts or if there are parts missing.

I would start by looking at the "Assembly" section of the manual. If it has a parts list, I would lay out all the parts and take note of what is missing. Basically build three groups:
  1. What I have that matches what the manual lists
  2. What I have that isn't listed in the manual
  3. A list of what is missing.
Then I'd cross check that with the appropriate diagrams on JD Parts. I'd send that detailed list of missing items back to the dealer.

Once I was sure I have all the parts, I'd start following the steps in the manual on assembly procedures. Yes, sometimes they are unclear. I've had some luck comparing them to the parts diagrams.

I've also had some luck finding pictures or videos online.
 

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If the manual has an assembly section, thats a great place to start, as mentioned. Sometimes they do, and sometimes they dont. Sometimes the are just as confusing as a box of bolts and parts and dont help much at all.

Generally, my first course of action is to find the diagram on JDParts.com
It will show you what parts go where, and what part numbers, and by extension what size bolts, are supposed to go where.
Then I print off the diagram and the parts list.
Then I compare what I am supposed to have with what I actually have.
Ive done this several times with used equipment Ive acquired.
 

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Snow Blower Installation Manuals

Here are the installation manuals:
 

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The wiring components are the front PTO shaft rotation detection circuit. When it senses rotation, it defeats the RIO so the blower PTO remains engaged when reversing. The sensor mounts in the front Quick Hitch, between the carrier bearings. The spacing between the end of the sensor and the hex portion of the driveshaft is critical. See the manuals I attached in my previous post as how to adjust it.

The sensor wiring connects to the tractor main harness at a plug located behind the alternator.
 

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You may have more longer bolts than the installation requires. The length of the bolts for the "Front Attachment Support" brackets will vary depending on whether you have the mid mount mower (MMM) and the grill guard (supplied with a FEL). I had all three and none of the supplied bolts were long enough for all three. So you may want to keep that in mind for trip to the hardware store, if you have all three. They are metric.

I checked a past post I made for the tie down brackets I fabricated. I utilized M12 x 60 bolts for that. So the next size shorter is likely what you would require if you have all three.
 

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Just the other day, there was a discussion about the "Set up Fee" that dealers commonly add to the purchase price of items when they are sold, especially with a new machine. Some implements, like back blades, box blades, even my core aerator, arrive pretty much ready to go to the dealer from Frontier or whoever manufactured the item, strapped to the pallet, requiring very little assembly or dealer technician labor. Cut the banding straps and deliver it to the customer.

Other implements, such as this one, arrive at the dealer as a parts menagerie. Depending upon the individual customers mechanical skills, ownership of tools and experience assembling projects and kits (remember the Erector Set when many of us were kids? I loved the challenge and built all kinds of elaborate mechanical things and I had friends who barely opened the boxes and years later, they were sold at a garage sale in complete form....) Some enjoy the challenge of such an assembly and others loathe it.

My neighbor bought the 54" snowblower for his 2210 (I think that's what he has...) and he is not the type that enjoys the mechanical challenge or as I quickly learned, owns tools that he can locate. The dealer wanted $400 in set up fees to assemble it on his tractor and he thought it excessive and refused to pay it, brought all of the packages home and then there was a knock on my door after he opened the boxes. After spending 20 minutes while he was looking for his ratchet and sockets, I just had him load the tractor and all boxes up and bring them to me.

You have to begin by laying out all of the parts and pieces and matching the inventory to the parts lists in the manuals. In his case, there were also missing parts and he was missing two critical mounting brackets, which the dealer had the following day from one of their other stores. But trying to assemble this without organizing everything and verifying its existence and making sure it's correct makes the task much, much harder and far more frustrating.

Some people enjoy the challenge of assembling these types of projects. Others do not. It's my hope that when people are buying these complex implements, they will consider the experiences of the member who started this thread and the numerous others who have struggled to assemble these on their machines. Also, for some customers, the set up fee makes more sense than struggling with this involved assembly and installation.

It's simply unacceptable that there seems to often be missing critical parts in the various hardware kits for this implement. Either the bags have been opened and the items someone else needed were robbed from the kits the dealer had in stock or who knows why these issues happen, but they occasionally do. Add to this the failure of some dealers parts departments to deliver everything the customer needs for the installation on their machine and the frustration grows.

Granted, different machines need different mounting brackets and hardware. Also, some machines use all of the parts and components in the kits and some do not. Certain machines need additional items (as in my neighbors case) yet didn't even have the wiring harness to plug the front rotation sensor into. The threads and sticky notes on GTT can be very helpful in the assembly process and there are many great GTT members who are willing to help those who need help.

Just make sure if you are buying the front snowblower for your machine, regardless of whether it's the 47" or the 54" snow blower, to measure the cost of the dealers "Set Up Fee" or "Installation cost" against your actual mechanical skills, tool ownership, patience level and your available time to deal with this as well as having a place to work on such a project. For some people, the best option might just be to pay someone else to handle the installation. Yes, the set up fee or installation fee might be $300 to $500, depending upon the machine, the blower, etc. But in some cases, that just might be a bargain. Each person has to assess this for themselves and make that decision.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Here are the installation manuals:
Thank You! The wiring and weather pak connectors had my reasonably baffled for a hydraulic/mechanical installation.
I forgot about "the Govment protecting me from myself" with various safety requirements
:banghead:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Just the other day, there was a discussion about the "Set up Fee" that dealers commonly add to the purchase price of items when they are sold, especially with a new machine. Some implements, like back blades, box blades, even my core aerator, arrive pretty much ready to go to the dealer from Frontier or whoever manufactured the item, strapped to the pallet, requiring very little assembly or dealer technician labor. Cut the banding straps and deliver it to the customer.

Other implements, such as this one, arrive at the dealer as a parts menagerie. Depending upon the individual customers mechanical skills, ownership of tools and experience assembling projects and kits (remember the Erector Set when many of us were kids? I loved the challenge and built all kinds of elaborate mechanical things and I had friends who barely opened the boxes and years later, they were sold at a garage sale in complete form....) Some enjoy the challenge of such an assembly and others loathe it.

My neighbor bought the 54" snowblower for his 2210 (I think that's what he has...) and he is not the type that enjoys the mechanical challenge or as I quickly learned, owns tools that he can locate. The dealer wanted $400 in set up fees to assemble it on his tractor and he thought it excessive and refused to pay it, brought all of the packages home and then there was a knock on my door after he opened the boxes. After spending 20 minutes while he was looking for his ratchet and sockets, I just had him load the tractor and all boxes up and bring them to me.

You have to begin by laying out all of the parts and pieces and matching the inventory to the parts lists in the manuals. In his case, there were also missing parts and he was missing two critical mounting brackets, which the dealer had the following day from one of their other stores. But trying to assemble this without organizing everything and verifying its existence and making sure it's correct makes the task much, much harder and far more frustrating.

Some people enjoy the challenge of assembling these types of projects. Others do not. It's my hope that when people are buying these complex implements, they will consider the experiences of the member who started this thread and the numerous others who have struggled to assemble these on their machines. Also, for some customers, the set up fee makes more sense than struggling with this involved assembly and installation.

It's simply unacceptable that there seems to often be missing critical parts in the various hardware kits for this implement. Either the bags have been opened and the items someone else needed were robbed from the kits the dealer had in stock or who knows why these issues happen, but they occasionally do. Add to this the failure of some dealers parts departments to deliver everything the customer needs for the installation on their machine and the frustration grows.

Granted, different machines need different mounting brackets and hardware. Also, some machines use all of the parts and components in the kits and some do not. Certain machines need additional items (as in my neighbors case) yet didn't even have the wiring harness to plug the front rotation sensor into. The threads and sticky notes on GTT can be very helpful in the assembly process and there are many great GTT members who are willing to help those who need help.

Just make sure if you are buying the front snowblower for your machine, regardless of whether it's the 47" or the 54" snow blower, to measure the cost of the dealers "Set Up Fee" or "Installation cost" against your actual mechanical skills, tool ownership, patience level and your available time to deal with this as well as having a place to work on such a project. For some people, the best option might just be to pay someone else to handle the installation. Yes, the set up fee or installation fee might be $300 to $500, depending upon the machine, the blower, etc. But in some cases, that just might be a bargain. Each person has to assess this for themselves and make that decision.
I am grateful for the members helpful hints and links to information
My biggest issue is with METRIC fasteners and ALL THREAD bolts when securing parts that ultimately have to be aligned
properly for all components to fit.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
You may have more longer bolts than the installation requires. The length of the bolts for the "Front Attachment Support" brackets will vary depending on whether you have the mid mount mower (MMM) and the grill guard (supplied with a FEL). I had all three and none of the supplied bolts were long enough for all three. So you may want to keep that in mind for trip to the hardware store, if you have all three. They are metric.

I checked a past post I made for the tie down brackets I fabricated. I utilized M12 x 60 bolts for that. So the next size shorter is likely what you would require if you have all three.
This 1026R started out life with FILB and MMM. When I bought it used, I did not want the mower. The dealer's service dept.
removed the mower but NOT the Hyd lift mechanism. I now have removed all the of the lift and posted it on a site for sale.
The tractor did come with a "grill guard" and while sorting out parts for the blower, I did some measuring and noticed that the
front hooks for the mower made up the difference between the grill guard width and the tractor frame width.
Some 3/8" X 3" flat iron and drilled 4 holes, that problem solved.
I got 3 Stainless Steel shims with the blower kit. I assume that they were to be used between the frame and
"front attachments support brackets" if needed? Other wise, they will sit in a box with extra fasteners.
 
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