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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All
The input seal of the gearbox on my 54 D MMM started leaking badly all of a sudden. The mower is on my 1025R the tractor has done 520 hrs about half mowing. I had just been mowing (1 1/2 hrs), the job was 10 kilometers (6.5 miles) away and the tractor was trailered there and back. I took the mower off to install the BH and FEL, when I noticed a puddle of oil under the gearbox the oil was clean which meant it hadn't leaked while mowing but on the short trip home. I removed the gearbox and checked the bearings for condition by turning the gearbox and wriggling the shafts, all feels ok, nice and tight with a smooth action. I then refilled the gear box over full to see what would happen, oil started leaking out of the input seal. I am going to get a new seal today. Has anyone had this seal fail and or replaced it, are there any tricks and any thing to look out for?
Thanks for any help John
 

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I believe there have been some posts before about replacing seals on the gearbox. Many different decks gearboxes are either the same or very similar. Have you tried a search here?

Also, I recall some talk before about using corn head gear oil before instead of 80W90. Guess it is thicker and stops seeping problems. Might be useful searching for that too.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Hi All
Further to the leaking seal. I removed the seal and found the nut that preloads the bearing on the input shaft to be loose on its tab washer (Timken nut and tab washer ). Possibly the cause of the seal failure.The tab washer had freet marks on it as did the nut, not very bad but indicating the nut had been loose for quite some time. I removed the outer cone part of the bearing, it and the cup were fine. Does anyone know what this nut should be tensioned to? thanks for any help.
Regards John.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi All
Has anyone rebuilt their MMM right angle drive gearbox, I am trying to find the torque settings for the gearbox .Any help would be appreciated. I have Googled it but can find nothing.
regards John
 

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Which mower deck?
 

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Member @Levi went through this I think, I don't believe there was a separate thread though.
 

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I think you are looking for tech service manual TM1763, or TM1763CD, to be able to get that.

I think that GTT member @martincom has that manual. Perhaps if you PM him, he might be able to help you out with the info you need.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi All
Sorry about starting a new thread but I have tried everything to get the Information I have googled it and could not find anything on it. The gear box is off a 54d on a 1025R the deck was delivered in January 2015. I removed the leaking Input shaft seal and found the Timken nut was not tight even though the tab washer stopped it from coming undone. The Timken tab washer had worn where it came in contact with the bearing, I have a new washer ordered. I just need the tension I need to set the preload on the bearing. The gearbox is fine as is the bearing. I don't know why the nut was loose in the first place the fretting of the tab washer would have made it even looser. I don't know what manual it would be in or where to get one.
Regards John
 

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No worries John 👍

I don't know what it is, but it's hard to get any information about the internals of these gearboxes. If I recall, seals and maybe bearings are listed in the parts catalog, but not the gears or other pieces. I haven't been able to stumble across who even make the gearbox yet, let alone any torque specs.
 

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Seems to me that gear box was made in Turkey.........as are many gear boxes.

I will see if I can find the info where this was noted......
 
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Seems like it was this company, now need to see if there are any technical manuals, etc. available.......

 
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I am going to GUESS the spec is in lb-inch to TURN the pinion, to check for bearing preload, not a torque spec for the nut.
Factory probably did this BEFORE the output shaft was installed. Driving the output shaft (drag of it's bearings and seal) will be more than just the pinion shaft.
So if you do find a spec for TURNING just the pinion shaft, you will need to increase it, unless you remove the output shaft.
 

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This does not have what you're seeking, but perhaps it'll help.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank you very much martincom, that is the most information I have been able to get. My gearbox is different. The drawing on page 23 shows "O" and "P" are a shim and a snap ring, on my gear box "O" is a Timken tab washer and "P" is a Timken nut and the input shaft has a key way and threaded in this area. What this drawing tells me is that there is very little or no preload on the bearing, because if there was preload on the bearings you would not be able to get the snap ring on. Thank you again.
Regards John
 

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Thank you very much martincom, that is the most information I have been able to get. My gearbox is different. The drawing on page 23 shows "O" and "P" are a shim and a snap ring, on my gear box "O" is a Timken tab washer and "P" is a Timken nut and the input shaft has a key way and threaded in this area. What this drawing tells me is that there is very little or no preload on the bearing, because if there was preload on the bearings you would not be able to get the snap ring on. Thank you again.
Regards John
Old paper mill millright here. If you have tapered timken bearings on a shaft with a timken nut and lock washer on one end of the shaft the procedure is to remove the slack from the bearings but not preload the bearings. In other words if you preload the bearings you will remove all the running clearance and eliminate the necessary room for an oil film between the bearings and cups. Bearings have to have that lubrication film or they will fail. Old rule of thumb is no lateral movement and no binding. In other words no slack but shaft will spin free. Start with some noticeable slack in the bearings and tighten the timken nut until the bearings are tight and shaft will not move laterally-- tight but the shaft still turns free. Some very large timken setups require one half to one thousandth of an inch per inch of shaft to allow for expansion but small shafts should not have any noticeable movement. The clearance was probably left too loose by mistake when it was assembled and that allowed shaft movement enough to damage the seal but had not run long enough to damage the bearings. Timken bearings will run with excessive slack for a long time if lubrication is maintained. If it was mine I would assemble it as I have said and run it. All this is assuming the timken washers inner locking tab fits in a slot in the shaft and the outer tab is bent into one of the outer slots in the nut to keep it from turning. I would bet my next retirement check it was assembled loose like you found it when you disassembled it.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hi cwsr. I am a maintenance Fitter and worked in the oil industry as Platform mechanic.
The Timken washer locates in the key way as you said and the tab was bent up to lock the nut, the washer only contacts a small part of the cone as the cone has a large radius to allow it to snug up to a step in a shaft. The cone had been turning on the shaft a little bit causing ware marks on the contact area on the washer increasing clearance. So I am going to replace the Timken washer, there is no other discernible ware where the cup sits in the housing or where the cone sits on the shaft. so I will be reinstalling the nut as you describe. Thanks for your help.
Regards John
 

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Hi cwsr. I am a maintenance Fitter and worked in the oil industry as Platform mechanic.
The Timken washer locates in the key way as you said and the tab was bent up to lock the nut, the washer only contacts a small part of the cone as the cone has a large radius to allow it to snug up to a step in a shaft. The cone had been turning on the shaft a little bit causing ware marks on the contact area on the washer increasing clearance. So I am going to replace the Timken washer, there is no other discernible ware where the cup sits in the housing or where the cone sits on the shaft. so I will be reinstalling the nut as you describe. Thanks for your help.
Regards John
If I am understanding you and the bearing cone had indications of turning on the shaft there may be a small amount of wear there that needs to be addressed. If in fact the inner race of the cone is "loose" in relation to the shaft there is another old trick to fix that. If you take a good sharp centerpunch and make a few center punch marks around the part of the shaft where the inner race runs it will tighten up the fit substantially, much like knurling will do to fix loose valve guides or bearing surfaces on a shaft. You being a mechanic on a rig platform may have already esposed you to some of what I am talking about, but hope it helps. If the bearing fit is loose the bearing race more than likely will continue to spin and wear even more.
 

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If I am understanding you and the bearing cone had indications of turning on the shaft there may be a small amount of wear there that needs to be addressed. If in fact the inner race of the cone is "loose" in relation to the shaft there is another old trick to fix that. If you take a good sharp centerpunch and make a few center punch marks around the part of the shaft where the inner race runs it will tighten up the fit substantially, much like knurling will do to fix loose valve guides or bearing surfaces on a shaft. You being a mechanic on a rig platform may have already esposed you to some of what I am talking about, but hope it helps. If the bearing fit is loose the bearing race more than likely will continue to spin and wear even more.
The last sentence of my last reply should have read "If the bearing fit is loose the bearing race more than likely will continue to spin and wear even more if it is not tightened up either by center punching or replacing the shaft".
 

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Loctite can also be used to keep the bearing from spinning and there is no damage to the shaft. Heat from a propane torch will allow the Loctite to release the bearing easily.
 
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