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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here is the build time lapse of my "not cheaper that way" shop. I set the GoPro up each day, was a total of around 17,000 pictures.

Shed Full Build Timelapse - YouTube

54' wide, 50' deep
Center is 30x50x16'
Wings are 12x50x10' each
Loft is 30x20' and rated for a whole lot of weight.
In Floor heat pipes, 4 zones
2) 12x10' insulated doors
1) 18x8' door
1 man door
17 windows, all open
Back retaining walls are insulated concrete forms (ICF)
3 floor drains
Bathroom piping roughed in
100 amp electrical pulled off the house's 200 amp service
And yes, its full, was full not long after it was completed

The Green 2320 is me removing the sod, filling in trenches. The orange Kubota tractor with a backhoe I rented for a day to do the under slab plumbing, the yellow struck dozer is Mike Drew's I borrowed to bury the downspout pipes (thanks again Mike)The big Link belt I paid. After stripping and saving the top soil they hauled away 23 dumptruck loads, insanity to think at one point I thought I could do that myself with my 2330. Would still be digging and swearing up a storm. Well spent $700.
 

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Excellent video. But, why did it take you a year and a half to share it with us all? :lol:

PS.....I have a lot of jealousy in my heart right now. HAHAHAHAHAHAHA
 

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Looks fantastic, something to be proud of. :bigthumb:
 

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Not to be a downer but that looked like a Union job.

Well built but an incredible amount of wasted equipment time.

Perhaps its the norm in your area .


Curious on what appears to be the 2 retaining walls ( back end and right side from "our" view) What is the purpose as the ground looked level unless I missed something.


Dan in Oregon
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Not to be a downer but that looked like a Union job.

Well built but an incredible amount of wasted equipment time.

Perhaps its the norm in your area .


Curious on what appears to be the 2 retaining walls ( back end and right side from "our" view) What is the purpose as the ground looked level unless I missed something.


Dan in Oregon
Was a pretty complicated build with all the headers. They spent quite a while on the loft and windows too. All the machines they used were sunbelt rentals. Also this was not all the pictures so may have been some action not on there.

It's into a hill. Almost 8' of dirt in the back corner. They said it would be cheaper to do a continuous wall than step it down a few times. Plus I got that much more insulated since it's icf.

I actually designed all the shell dimensions. It's located close to the house so spent extra $$ to make it look nice like the wide window trim and raised trim on the overhead doors. Also the steep center roofline.

Building restrictions were very lax in my township. X' setbacks off lot lines and under 35' tall. Top of weather vane on coupola is knocking on 35!
 

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That is a very nice building. Congratulations :good2:
 

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Here is the build time lapse of my "not cheaper that way" shop. I set the GoPro up each day, was a total of around 17,000 pictures.

Shed Full Build Timelapse - YouTube

54' wide, 50' deep
Center is 30x50x16'
Wings are 12x50x10' each
Loft is 30x20' and rated for a whole lot of weight.
In Floor heat pipes, 4 zones
2) 12x10' insulated doors
1) 18x8' door
1 man door
17 windows, all open
Back retaining walls are insulated concrete forms (ICF)
3 floor drains
Bathroom piping roughed in
100 amp electrical pulled off the house's 200 amp service
And yes, its full, was full not long after it was completed

The Green 2320 is me removing the sod, filling in trenches. The orange Kubota tractor with a backhoe I rented for a day to do the under slab plumbing, the yellow struck dozer is Mike Drew's I borrowed to bury the downspout pipes (thanks again Mike)The big Link belt I paid. After stripping and saving the top soil they hauled away 23 dumptruck loads, insanity to think at one point I thought I could do that myself with my 2330. Would still be digging and swearing up a storm. Well spent $700.
Was a pretty complicated build with all the headers. They spent quite a while on the loft and windows too. All the machines they used were sunbelt rentals. Also this was not all the pictures so may have been some action not on there.

It's into a hill. Almost 8' of dirt in the back corner. They said it would be cheaper to do a continuous wall than step it down a few times. Plus I got that much more insulated since it's icf. :good2:

I actually designed all the shell dimensions. It's located close to the house so spent extra $$ to make it look nice like the wide window trim and raised trim on the overhead doors. Also the steep center roofline.

Building restrictions were very lax in my township. X' setbacks off lot lines and under 35' tall. Top of weather vane on coupola is knocking on 35!
Very nice. :good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sweet shop, I think that is the style I would like to go with. Did you design the whole thing?
I designed all the outside dimensions, roof pitches, window and door sizes and placements. Builder figured out all the framework required to make that.

I went for that style for the look and so I could a have lower sections for workshop and storage and smaller to finish and heat. Center is tall for loft and future car lift.
 

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Super Nice! :bigthumb:
 

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What did you do to prepare for the car lift?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
There are 2 4x8' areas with no heat pipes and concrete is thicker. The internet said the change in thickness would cause cracks and they were right. I think most lifts only require like 5 or 6" thick. I made mine 12....
 

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Control joints would have helped keep the cracking from getting too out of hand; or expansion/isolation joints would have done the same thing, which is probably the route I would have gone. Was the transition from thick to thin done with a sharp 90-degree inside corner, or did they do it with a 45-degree chamfer? The 45-degree chamfer would have been the way to go.

Yeah, I know it's too late to go back and do it again; I'm just throwing ideas out there.
 

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love the timelapse.........very nice barn........loved the reality of the part where they had to redo the upper windows.........also was wondering where the plumbing was going till the end ...
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Ya the upper windows were supposed to be spaced even. Noticed it right away. Luckily they only had a couple. Not real clear but originally we had 2'x2' coupola and it looked silly small so I had them change it out for a 3'x3'.
 
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