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Discussion Starter #1
After three years of lurking I picked up my first JD! :) I picked up a 2007 x744, with a 62C deck. I was working on getting the deck setup and found that two of the gauge wheel posts are stuck and I can't adjust the height of those two wheels. In general the deck is in great condition, the posts don't look bent or rusted. I put PB Blaster on the posts all day, blocked the deck up off the ground with some 2x4s and gave the posts several knocks with a 10lb sledge hammer. Now, I wasn't taking big swings, but those things won't move. I could try hitting them harder, but I'm not sure how hard I can hit them without causing bigger problems. Anyone know any tricks to get those posts freed up again?
 

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Soak them a few more times and try to pull the pins and twist them back and forth with a pipe wrench.
 

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Good idea. I'd thought of twisting them, but not the pipe wrench for some reason. I figure those shafts are goners at this point so if they get chewed up by the wrench it won't be the end of the world.
 

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Good idea. I'd thought of twisting them, but not the pipe wrench for some reason. I figure those shafts are goners at this point so if they get chewed up by the wrench it won't be the end of the world.
I would try to find a long pin or something that will fit in the holes in the shaft to try twisting it. Maybe even a screwdriver? But a few days of soaking with penetrating oil will help for sure.

When I had to remove my steering wheel for the first time I soaked it 3 times a day for 5 days with Kroil before I even attempted getting it off - and it worked!
 

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Are the pins moving to release the shafts?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The pins came out fine, one was stiff and full of grit but still came out. I took them off the deck until I free up the shafts so I don't need to mess with them. I'll keep dousing the shafts with PB blaster. It's times like this I wish I'd have just bitten the bullet and bought Kroil, I can't find it local and shipping was killer on it last time I looked. Kroil works 10 times better though! I did try the screwdriver idea, but it was just going to bend.
 

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The pins came out fine, one was stiff and full of grit but still came out. I took them off the deck until I free up the shafts so I don't need to mess with them. I'll keep dousing the shafts with PB blaster. It's times like this I wish I'd have just bitten the bullet and bought Kroil, I can't find it local and shipping was killer on it last time I looked. Kroil works 10 times better though! I did try the screwdriver idea, but it was just going to bend.
I bought a pair of the king size Kroil a few years ago with a special price. I savor it - only use it for stuff like you are working on. Still on my first can.

With lots of soaking with PBlaster and some patience I think you will get them eventually unless you have a source of heat. But then you will also be doing some painting.
 

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Rust and corrosion can be a real bear to deal with. I've seen a truck's 2" receiver hitch so rusted to the hitch insert that nothing would remove it. It's like welding something together. That said, I'm still surprised that with penetrating oil and a big hammer you couldn't even begin to budge it.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm going to take a different approach when I get home. Up until now I've just been lowering the deck onto some wood and pounding. I'm going to pull the deck off and flip it over to put some PBlaster on the underside of the shafts. After it's soaked a while I'll flip it onto some cinderblocks or something else hard. That way the wood won't be absorbing any of the impact. If that doesn't work after a few days I'll either try my small torch or wait till the end of the season and deal with it then. The cut is still WAY better than the 42" craftsman it's replacing. :D
 

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I'm going to take a different approach when I get home. Up until now I've just been lowering the deck onto some wood and pounding. I'm going to pull the deck off and flip it over to put some PBlaster on the underside of the shafts. After it's soaked a while I'll flip it onto some cinderblocks or something else hard. That way the wood won't be absorbing any of the impact. If that doesn't work after a few days I'll either try my small torch or wait till the end of the season and deal with it then. The cut is still WAY better than the 42" craftsman it's replacing. :D
Getting some penetrating oil in from the opposite side will really help.
 

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Soak them a few more times and try to pull the pins and twist them back and forth with a pipe wrench.
Maybe instead of a pipe wrench, vise grips. Then pound on the back ( not lever side of the vise grips) with a soft (lead, brass, dead blow) hammer :dunno:

Be prepared to file or grind off the bite marks the pipe wrench or vise grips make on the shaft BEFORE you pound it though (if that frees it up)
 

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Maybe instead of a pipe wrench, vise grips. Then pound on the back ( not lever side of the vise grips) with a soft (lead, brass, dead blow) hammer :dunno:

Be prepared to file or grind off the bite marks the pipe wrench or vise grips make on the shaft BEFORE you pound it though (if that frees it up)
The thing is I don't like pounding on the deck downward.If their that stuck let the penetrating oil do its thing and try twisting to loosen.Pounding could break the weld or bend something.The cost of new gauge wheel shafts is better then a new/used deck.Have some patience and let the oil do its job,it took a long time to rust up,take some time to free them up.
With the pipe wrench on the shaft I'd tap on the handle of the wrench in both directions rather than down, and yes a soft type hammer is good to use to reduce damage.
 

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I just addressed the same issue tonight...

I unscrewed the bracket that holds the pin in place and removed the pin to prevent it from slipping back in. I soaked the shaft it in PB Blaster overnight and throughout today. I then raised the deck, supported the gage wheel bracket with a 2X6 on edge and lowered the deck so the bracket was resting on the 2X6.. I then protected the shaft with a block of UHMW plastic and beat on it with a hand held sledge. It started to move after a few hits.

Considering this deck is new to me and is replacing a badly bent deck, I was very cautious about ensuring that the gage wheel bracket was thoroughly supported.

Obviously there are different degrees of corrosion but that is what worked for me.

BTW - my next course of action if I felt I continued hammering or wrenching on the post would damage the deck would be to cut the post off near flush then drill it out.

Good luck.
 

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The anti-scalp wheels came with both inch and metric sized shafts depending on the year of the deck. The 62C deck on the 2004 x495 I bought used had the metric shafts in the inch collars of the deck -- so whoever did the replacement did not pay attention to what size was needed. If you crossed the parts the other way it should be an interference fit...put if it were a tight press fit maybe a prior owner made an ideal situation for corrosion to really get things stuck. Here are some pictures of my metric shaft as I bought it and how it should have been with the inch size shaft of the older style 62C deck:

metric vs inch size gauge wheel post.jpg

...is the height adjust pin you took out inch or metric? Does the hole in the shaft appear a bit larger than the holes in the collars? There is probably enough of the shaft showing somewhere that you can get a good measure to see if it is metric or inch. God luck in getting it all apart...

Here is the 62C manual if you don't already have it.

View attachment OMM 146676 62C manual.pdf

Chuck
 

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I unscrewed the bracket that holds the pin in place and removed the pin to prevent it from slipping back in. I soaked the shaft it in PB Blaster overnight and throughout today. I then raised the deck, supported the gage wheel bracket with a 2X6 on edge and lowered the deck so the bracket was resting on the 2X6.. I then protected the shaft with a block of UHMW plastic and beat on it with a hand held sledge. It started to move after a few hits.

Considering this deck is new to me and is replacing a badly bent deck, I was very cautious about ensuring that the gage wheel bracket was thoroughly supported.

Obviously there are different degrees of corrosion but that is what worked for me.

BTW - my next course of action if I felt I continued hammering or wrenching on the post would damage the deck would be to cut the post off near flush then drill it out.

Good luck.
If you got it to move you are gaining on it. Continued soaking with penetrating oil will do it I think. A day of soaking - a few taps - another day of soaking - another few taps.
 

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The thing is I don't like pounding on the deck downward.If their that stuck let the penetrating oil do its thing and try twisting to loosen.Pounding could break the weld or bend something.The cost of new gauge wheel shafts is better then a new/used deck.Have some patience and let the oil do its job,it took a long time to rust up,take some time to free them up.
With the pipe wrench on the shaft I'd tap on the handle of the wrench in both directions rather than down, and yes a soft type hammer is good to use to reduce damage.
You have to reverse the pipe wrench to tap in the other direction, the jaws are designed to grip only in one direction.
 

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Kroil is available at Walmart...PRICEY, just shy of $30. Bob
 

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It was just a few more taps...

If you got it to move you are gaining on it. Continued soaking with penetrating oil will do it I think. A day of soaking - a few taps - another day of soaking - another few taps.
Sorry I wasn't clear. Once it started moving it quickly came out the rest of the way.

Thanks
 

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Thanks Stan, just ordered....always wanted to try it at a good price:bigthumb:
 
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