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Hey guys I bought my first Tractor ever about 3 months ago. It's a 1969 JD 820 and needs a little tlc and after seeing some restored 820 was just wondering how much I could expect to spend on a restoration. I know there are many variables such as mechanical issues that could dictate the price. Thanks in advance from a mechanically handicapped pig farmer from South Carolina.
 

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Some guys will paint a tractor and call it restored. A correct restoration will have you replacing any wear items and rebuilding every system that's part of the tractor to include the engine, transmission, final drives, PTO, hydraulic system, wheels and bearings, etc, etc. this doesn't include the mandatory paint, graphics, seat, and other visual improvements. Remember, a restoration will bring the tractor back to factory new condition, not just look good.

IMHO a good restoration will cost much more than repairing and painting a tractor.

How much will it cost you? I think I f you do it you can easily expect to pay anywhere between $5-10k. Double or even triple that if you're paying to have it restored.
 

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Welcome.

The 820 is a slick little tractor, especially with power steering.
 

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I know there are many variables such as mechanical issues that could dictate the price.
Yep.
Depends on how much you're willing to spend on a restoration.

BTW, welcome to GTT. :greentractorride:
 

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Three things (other than money) that are needed for this sort of undertaking:
1) Patience. Some of the hardware you are going to encounter hasn't budged since the tractor was assembled. Some of it was 'repaired' in the field using methods not sanctioned by Deere. Restoring a tractor, especially a big one, is not a weekend project.
2) Good tools/good shop. Make sure you have the space to dis-assemble and clean a dozen sub-assemblies and not run out of workbench space. It's amazing how small a 2-car garage can get when you take a tractor apart inside of it. A clean and finished workspace is preferable to a pole barn with a dirt floor. A torch for heating up stuck bolts and a wire wheel to clean them up are both vital tools alongside a good wrench set.
3) An organizational system. It may be months, if not a year or two between taking some pieces off your derelict and putting them back onto your show-ready tractor. I like to use a combination of coffee cans for small components, milk crates for larger ones, and the really big bits go on their own shelf or shelves. Label everything no matter how obvious it may seem when you are taking it appart. Come up with a system that works for you and stick to it.

Also, take lots of pictures! Not just to chronicle the build, but also to remember how something gets re-assembled. Plus, you can share them here with us! :munch:

Welcome to GTT! :greentractorride:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks fellas got a couple quote's today they seem to be on average around the 20000 dollar range. I have ordered a manual for it and will deff take a lot of pics and keep you guys posted. If I run into anynissues I will deff bug you guys like a mosquitoes on a summer evening. Thanks for welcoming me to the site
 
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