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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. Todd in Myakka City Florida. Just bought a diesel 6x4 that needs a lot of work. I'm going to restore it, but have no idea on year or model. There are no tags that I can see the model numbers. I was wondering if there is another way to find info on it. Thanks...I believe this site will be a treasure trove of information I might need.
782707
 

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Todd,

The product serial number is located at the back of the frame as seen in this illustration from the TM1518 Service manual.
783250


The engine serial number will be on the valve cover as shown here:
783251


Your 6x4 is pretty rough appearance-wise, but these are rugged machines and well worth bringing back to running condition. Hopefully the mechanicals were not too neglected in its past... I have the full documentation if you want me to look anything up -- it is a huge 55 MB file so be selective on what you ask, thanks!

Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Todd,

The product serial number is located at the back of the frame as seen in this illustration from the TM1518 Service manual.
View attachment 783250

The engine serial number will be on the valve cover as shown here:
View attachment 783251

Your 6x4 is pretty rough appearance-wise, but these are rugged machines and well worth bringing back to running condition. Hopefully the mechanicals were not too neglected in its past... I have the full documentation if you want me to look anything up -- it is a huge 55 MB file so be selective on what you ask, thanks!

Chuck
Thanks Chuck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Todd,

The product serial number is located at the back of the frame as seen in this illustration from the TM1518 Service manual.
View attachment 783250

The engine serial number will be on the valve cover as shown here:
View attachment 783251

Your 6x4 is pretty rough appearance-wise, but these are rugged machines and well worth bringing back to running condition. Hopefully the mechanicals were not too neglected in its past... I have the full documentation if you want me to look anything up -- it is a huge 55 MB file so be selective on what you ask, thanks!

Chuck
Hi Chuck.
Do you have a picture or diagram of the fuel delivery system for the gator? I don't seem to be getting fuel to the lift pump.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Todd,

The product serial number is located at the back of the frame as seen in this illustration from the TM1518 Service manual.
View attachment 783250

The engine serial number will be on the valve cover as shown here:
View attachment 783251

Your 6x4 is pretty rough appearance-wise, but these are rugged machines and well worth bringing back to running condition. Hopefully the mechanicals were not too neglected in its past... I have the full documentation if you want me to look anything up -- it is a huge 55 MB file so be selective on what you ask, thanks!

Chuck42
Hi Chuck. I was wondering on the oil filter size for my 2Gator diesel. I am open to a cross reference filter. RLike I said before I don't know the year of it. I know it's a yanmar 3TN66 motor. Thanks for any info.

Todd
 

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Todd,

The Deere part number for the filter is AM107423 and they are about $7.50 each. Here is a link:


I am sure they cross to other filters, but I always use the Deere brand to be certain of proper fit and function.

Chuck
 

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Welcome to the site from a fellow Floridan. I live in Orlando area....

Brendan
 

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Not a reply, but a question. Any harm in burning #2 oil (home heating oil) in a 2021 John Deere Gator?
 

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Sal -- Here is a great and complete answer from another forum on this fuel interchangeability topic:

From: Michael Heaton, former /CEO/Chief Pilot at Agile Air Service - An Airline for Children (1994-2003)

The short answer is yes. However there are some serious details to consider.

While #2 heating oil and #2 diesel fuel are essentially the same, your experience would not always be the same.

What is sold as diesel fuel is actually a mixture of diesel fuel and kerosene for much of the year. Straight #2 heating oil will be just fine, and in fact the very best fuel in the summertime as well as most of the spring and fall. However, at around 5° F this liquid turns to jelly that will not function at all in a diesel engine or its unheated fuel filtering and delivery system. The solution is to add kerosene (sometimes called furnace oil or #1 diesel) to it to lower the “pour point” to over come this problem at times when the outside air temp (OAT) is low enough to cause this effect which will totally disable, though not harm, a diesel engine.

An ideal vehicle in an ideal American environment would carry both fuels and add clear kero only when absolutely necessary or have an electrically heated fuel system and tank. But this would add an unacceptable supply chain complexity and several other problems. The solution the industry has come down to is to change the ratio seasonally as appropriate.

Since there are endless usage scenarios for diesel vehicles, especially with regard to how fast the fuel is used after the tank is filled, the kero is added almost year around in steadily increasing amounts from September to February and then lesser amounts after that. Consequently, a diesel engine achieves its very best economy in the mid summer when there is little or no kero, which has a lower energy content, mixed into the fuel. However, no all around solution works all of the time. If a vehicle is fueled in mid summer and then not started and run until February, or fueled on Florida and driven immediately to Boston, this could be a problem.

Then there is the issue of Highway Use Tax. Each of the states (in the USA) add an average of $0.25 per gal of tax to motor fuels and the Federal Government adds about that much more for a total of approximately 50 to 55 cents total tax on each gal. of fuel that will be burned on the nations highways. So, putting heating oil in the tank of a highway vehicle and then driving it on the road is a felony in virtually all jurisdictions. Although you are unlikely to be caught, the penalties if you are caught are very serious. Consider also, if you do this, evade the tax by using heating oil on the road, you will be leaving an evidence trail that is unmistakable. If someone in enforcement suspects that you are evading the use tax in this manner, there is a red dye in #2 fuel sold as heating oil, the fuel would not only be visually discoverable in a small sample from your tank, but your paper filter element (s) would be dyed red if you did this just once. The only way to erase that evidence would be to change the filters as they would serve to incriminate you for the rest of the life of the filter after such a violation.

Hope this is helpful,

Chuck
 

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Hi Chuck,
I am a little confused by your first sentence to my question if there was harm in burning #2 heating oil in the Gator. Your short answer was "Yes", but (unless I misunderstood) it seems that it works fine except in the winter in addition to not paying the road tax, which is illegal. Should you have said "no" then told me why I should not?

Since I have 500 gallons of #2 fuel in storage that is of no use to me, I have been using it up in my Mahindra tractor. Yeah, I know, no road tax - but the tractor is used on the farm so my guilt of screwing the government out of $.25 on a scale of 1 - 10 is a 1.
 

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Sorry -- I should have posted the other forum's question as well as Mike Heaton's answer...the "yes" is a response the interchangeability question so the answer means that both fuels are equivalent in terms of performance at normal temperatures. I can see where his short answer could have appeared to be to your question about harm, but it is not. I had thought my use of bold text in the transplanted quotation from Mike would have made it clear I was posting his comments to address the "interchangeability" in my one line introduction...

Did not mean to be ambiguous...hope this clarifies it.

Use of the heating oil in the tractor is not a violation of the road tax issue, as it is an agricultural machine. This is also true of your Gator unless you have a road use license plate/registration on it and use it on highways regularly. It would be a good way to use up the #2 heating oil. You can blend it to avoid any issues in very cold conditions if that is a concern.

Chuck
 

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Since I have 500 gallons of #2 fuel in storage that is of no use to me, I have been using it up in my Mahindra tractor.
I have my home heating fuel and tractor fuel delivered at the same time mid summer. Been using it in my tractor for 14 years or so now.

Using it in a Gator would make no difference being there are no diesel emmissions equipment on them.

Here in Pennsylvania the off road and heating fuel are the exact same thing.

You don’t disclose your location so don’t know if you are subject to cold weather. When I get my fuel delivered I have a 150 gallon tank for my tractor and 1000 gallon tank for the house. The tractor tank gets treated with the appropriate dose of Stanadyne Performance Formula and the fuel is good rear round to about -20*F.
 

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Hi Chuck,
I am a little confused by your first sentence to my question if there was harm in burning #2 heating oil in the Gator. Your short answer was "Yes", but (unless I misunderstood) it seems that it works fine except in the winter in addition to not paying the road tax, which is illegal. Should you have said "no" then told me why I should not?

Since I have 500 gallons of #2 fuel in storage that is of no use to me, I have been using it up in my Mahindra tractor. Yeah, I know, no road tax - but the tractor is used on the farm so my guilt of screwing the government out of $.25 on a scale of 1 - 10 is a 1.
Hey Sal - There is no requirement to use road taxed fuel in tractors, heavy equipment, etc that are not used on the public roads. Don't feel bad or like you're screwing the gov out of money with your tractor on your farm. Infact by using road taxed fuel only on your farm, you're actually just giving your money (the fuel taxes paid) as a donation to the Gov.
 

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I have my home heating fuel and tractor fuel delivered at the same time mid summer. Been using it in my tractor for 14 years or so now.

Using it in a Gator would make no difference being there are no diesel emmissions equipment on them.

Here in Pennsylvania the off road and heating fuel are the exact same thing.

You don’t disclose your location so don’t know if you are subject to cold weather. When I get my fuel delivered I have a 150 gallon tank for my tractor and 1000 gallon tank for the house. The tractor tank gets treated with the appropriate dose of Stanadyne Performance Formula and the fuel is good rear round to about -20*F.
Actually, I use the heating fuel in "Old Blue" (my 1986 F-250). Been using #2 for year with no issues. Use the truck mostly for hauling firewood to heat my house. Live in a high tax state (Connecticut).
 

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My understanding of the off-road fuel thing, if it has tires then you need to pay a percentage of road tax, they assume you drive on the road from time to time. Now what that is and how much I have no idea, never had it come up in 40years of running heavy equipment, but I do have a grader and scraper that go down the road with red fuel.
 

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My understanding of the off-road fuel thing, if it has tires then you need to pay a percentage of road tax, they assume you drive on the road from time to time. Now what that is and how much I have no idea, never had it come up in 40years of running heavy equipment, but I do have a grader and scraper that go down the road with red fuel.
It is all about money for the government. After spending billions of dollars to get people to quit smoking, Connecticut is allowing recreational marijuana smoking. Has nothing to do with health and all to do with taxes. If they could figure out a way to tax prostitution, they would pass legislation and make it legal. What this has to do with #2 fuel is nothing. Just had to vent for a sec.
 
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