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I'd bet my mower deck (62D2) would cease to work properly!:unknown:


...and no, I'm not going to be the guinea pig and switch to grease!:)
 

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Care to give the cliff notes version for those of us who aren't lubrication nerds yet are curious of the results?

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For me there were a few main takeaways, first is that lithium or polyurea greases are best in gearboxes, and to avoid ones with graphite.

In order for a grease to lubricate a gearbox, it needs to be able to "separate" the base oil to lubricate the gears. Another key factor is that the grease is able to flow within the gearbox and not just get thrown aside and the gears run dry.

One thing i thought was very curious was that they said for very small gearboxes, like on a hedge trimmer, a #2 grease was actually better than a semi-liquid grease like a "00".

Finally, it sounds as though filling a gearbox at least half full is ideal to use grease. The more the better until it's too full and gets forced out.
 

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I'd bet my mower deck (62D2) would cease to work properly!



...and no, I'm not going to be the guinea pig and switch to grease!
Actually if you filled it with a good "00" lithium or polyurea grease I could guarantee it would work just fine! I've found accounts of guys filling mower deck boxes with grease and having no problems.

In my mind though, i would always prefer gear oil as long as it's not leaking out.
 

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""The next issue of the Lubrisense White Papers will focus on calcium sulphonate (complex) greases and their applications in different industry segments. This is a relatively new technology which is gaining ground all over the world. By utilising such types of overbased sulphonate chemistries, different active materials can be incorporated into the thickener matrix instead of dissolving conventional additives in the base fluids. The sulphonate is therefore not only a gellant but offers other additional and interesting advantages.

At AXEL,
we have chosen to call such systems “functional soaps”. We are pleased to announce that Dr. Gareth Fish, PhD CLS CLGS, Technical Fellow & Strategic Technology Manager, Industrial Additives & Greases at The Lubrizol Corporation, a well-known specialist in this technology, has agreed to author the main article for the next issue. As usual, we encourage reader contribution, feedback and proposals concerning relevant topics for future issues
of our White Papers.''

Something to look forward to reading.....(being facetious)....I read the entire report and no question these professionals are passionate about their lubrication. :good2:

When I read stuff like this, I am thankful there are people interested in these fields and working to improve lubricants and products which improve productivity and profitability across industries. I have to be honest, it would be hard for me to get excited about getting up each morning and heading into the lab to study such matters. To each their own and it's all part of what makes the world go around......Smoothly and with less gear pitting and axle wear......:laugh::lol:, which has to be good for the world.:bigthumb:


 
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Actually if you filled it with a good "00" lithium or polyurea grease I could guarantee it would work just fine! I've found accounts of guys filling mower deck boxes with grease and having no problems.

In my mind though, i would always prefer gear oil as long as it's not leaking out.
The ability to contain the lubricant seems like its of paramount importance when determining whether the gear box is going to be lubricated with either gear oil or a grease component. Also, the operating temps are another big factor. Grease seems to be used when oils are difficult or impossible to contain which would make sense. But greases struggle in very cold climates to lubricate.

When gear oil gets moisture in the gear case, it causes the oil to get "frothy" and lose its lubrication qualities. Is it because the moisture changes the viscosity of the lubricant or is it because the oil and water separate and the section of the gear case with the water in it receives the wear and damage due to the lack of the oil and the presence of the water in the gear case?

Would the same happen to a gear case with grease when moisture is introduced?
 
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I just mentioned this in another thread,,, "corn head grease"

This grease will stay in a gearbox that leaks gear oil ,,,

I have been using it in a rotary plow gearbox for half a decade,,,
 

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The ability to contain the lubricant seems like its of paramount importance when determining whether the gear box is going to be lubricated with either gear oil or a grease component. Also, the operating temps are another big factor. Grease seems to be used when oils are difficult or impossible to contain which would make sense. But greases struggle in very cold climates to lubricate.

When gear oil gets moisture in the gear case, it causes the oil to get "frothy" and lose its lubrication qualities. Is it because the moisture changes the viscosity of the lubricant or is it because the oil and water separate and the section of the gear case with the water in it receives the wear and damage due to the lack of the oil and the presence of the water in the gear case?

Would the same happen to a gear case with grease when moisture is introduced?
Those are good questions that I’m not sure the answer, I’ve many times encountered oil that had turned into a milkshake from water getting in. I don’t know exactly the effect accept that it was bad, and metal would start to rust.

I feel like grease is less prone to mixing with water, so in a very wet environment I’d bet a grease could be a better option than gear oil if contamination is likely. This whole grease replacing oil is a new concept for me, but I started doing research when I replaced the liquid grease in the gear box of my single stage JD 49” snowblower on my 316.

I ended up finding a quality “00” lithium based grease that seems like cool stuff!
 
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expanding on AJs take on the article ......the problem with grease was it as imediately expelled from the gears and then the gears formed a cavity in the grease thus the gears were unlubricated and uncooled untill the gears stopped and allowed the grease to flow back in the gear cavities

so the best greases were ones that would separate out there oil base from the thickener and the oil would provide the lubrication and coolant ......greases with graphite and moly were less effective at this.......greases that used lithium or polyurea as thickeners were the best at this

that is how i understood the article

i have not used corn head grease for anything but i think i will get some just to see what i think of it.....in my mind the speed of the gear box would have a lot to do with how the grease performed
 

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expanding on AJs take on the article ......the problem with grease was it as imediately expelled from the gears and then the gears formed a cavity in the grease thus the gears were unlubricated and uncooled untill the gears stopped and allowed the grease to flow back in the gear cavities

so the best greases were ones that would separate out there oil base from the thickener and the oil would provide the lubrication and coolant ......greases with graphite and moly were less effective at this.......greases that used lithium or polyurea as thickeners were the best at this

that is how i understood the article

i have not used corn head grease for anything but i think i will get some just to see what i think of it.....in my mind the speed of the gear box would have a lot to do with how the grease performed
Thanks, you did a better job explaining what i was trying to get at!

To your point it sounds like gearboxes that develop enough heat to "melt" the grease are the best applications.

If you want to experiment I'd suggest getting some "00" grease as well, which is more fluid than cornhead grease which i believe is a "0" thickness.
 

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We used Corn Head Grease, or Cotton Picker Spindle Lube in gearboxes of rotary cutters back in the mid '60's.

Damage a gearbox seal? Keep on truck'n. :good2:
 
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