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First off glad you are OK

YEP,, your fault, agree with the others,, Needed to have ROPS up, Seat Belt, bucket lower to the ground ,
While going down the hill , to quick ways to stop.

Push your fel control lever forward quickly and it will stop you, second or first lower your ballast box

IMO Turf tires for what you are doing are the WORST tires you could ever own. If you continue working on a hill side .. buy a set of chains.

and leave the tractor in 4wd. There are NO BRAKES on the front of a tractor,, Braking comes from being in 4wd.. using the engine, and driveshaft to slow you down.
One thing I don't remember seeing or reading... Were you in H or L range. ??
Doing loader work , IMO always L range.
 

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2020 1025R, 120R, 54D
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Wheel spacers offer nothing when going up.or down a slope since they only provide stability side to side.

Another thing to keep in mind is to back down a slope to keep as much weight as possible on the rears.

I upgraded my 4WD lever to one the comes up along the side of the seat. Makes it easy to grab without bending over in the seat.
 

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This is a great example of the reason to back down a hill with a loaded bucket. Even with rear ballast, always back down. Keeping the bucket as close to the ground as possible.
 

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Why doesn't somebody invent a hydraulic ROPS actuator?
That's genius! Pair it with some sort of proximity sensor so it knows when you are getting close to the barn and it lowers.... quick, patent that idea and then let the dollars roll in!
 

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Early 2017 Vintage 1025R TLB (260/H120)
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That's genius! Pair it with some sort of proximity sensor so it knows when you are getting close to the barn and it lowers.... quick, patent that idea and then let the dollars roll in!
Someone else on GTT fabed that up already using a linear actuator. (operates on a switch, not a proximity sensor though - That could be bad if operating inside the "area" and ROPS folds down when it's needed.... )
 

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2022 Ram 3500 CTD
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I should have had the ROPS up. I always wear my seatbelt.

The ROPS is a pain in the ass, especially with a bad shoulder. On the left side I actually rest it on my head to get the pin it. Right side I can manage. And my tractor won't fit in my shed with it up. But yes, it should have been up.

Why doesn't somebody invent a hydraulic ROPS actuator?
Or left it the way it was before it got “redesigned”.
 

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1025r with Mauser cab.
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Glad for the safe outcome...

BUT, this thread begs the question: If you could stream an always-on dash cam from someone's tractor, which GTT member would be most entertaining?
Depends how you define "Entertaining".
 
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Ballast box is full of 3/4 stone topped by two 50 lb. bags of concrete. Tires are not loaded and I keep them at 20 lbs. Back in the day we had a small fleet of trucks and my father was a fanatic about maintaining tire pressure, and it's carried over to me. But of course fuel economy and tread life really aren't a factor for the mileage we put on a tractor.

My ballast box when I got it was full of gravel. I found this is not near dense enough and raises the center of gravity. I cleaned it all out, and filled with lead on the bottom and steel on top of that. Now it is only 2/3rds full but weighs a LOT more lowering the center of gravity.

You mentioned the 4WD fighting you. Were you on pavement?
 
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All of us who own and use these tractors know this very easily could have happened to us. It's easy to sit back and "Would Have" "Could Have" as well as "Should Have" as Tuesday early PM quarterbacks.

However, first and foremost, I thank Upset264 for having the humility to remind everyone of us the importance of always doing what's safest. This is an important reminder to all SCUT and CUT owners, but even more so to those newer owners and operators who often significantly underestimate the probability that each of us will have some type of "incident" while using our machines.

Hopefully, the incident will be limited to a first hand reminder of these machines limitations and risks and no one is injured and property isn't damaged. But any GTT members who have been around some time know that there have been some very close calls and even very serious situations involving GTT members and their machines.

How many times have we had members who insist that rear ballast isn't important, or they comment "I have been doing this with my SCUT / CUT for years without any rear ballast and I have never had any problems" ?? Those situations always bother me because an unbalanced machine is a dangerous and unpredictable machine. Not to mention it places stress and strain on the machines critical components, pointlessly. Yet it still happens........

The 18 degree grade in the hill on the road I built to our lower river area is one where I always have to remind myself "Stop at the top of the hill, downshift to LOW, put in 4wd and proceed". Once I reach the bottom, I almost always stop again, shift out of low into high and return to 2wd.

When down in the lower area, I usually remain in 2wd and in High gear as I work around that area. However, when I am working on the road itself, I will shift to low and 4wd and keep it there the entire time I am working on the road.

I will admit that when I am merely climbing back up the hill, I run in 2wd and in high gear. Admittedly, I run in high gear probably 90% of the time, including when snow plowing.

As I was just talking about over the weekend in another thread here on GTT, the brake pedal isn't in a natural position to push as a "response" pedal to its need. Instead, its much higher than the other directional pedals and requires the operator to lift their foot and place it on the pedal and push straight forward.

The 1 series brake pedal requires an intentional and dedicated action to depress , based upon where its located. For me, its in a strange position, where its higher than one would expect and I firmly believe that one should "practice" pushing the brake pedal so the muscle memory is there when needed.

If you were in a panic response and depressing the pedal, it would be easy to potentially miss the pedal pad or have your foot slip if its not squarely on the pedal. Perhaps the pedal depression is less of an issue for operators with shorter legs as my legs have to be bent fully at the knee, to comfortably sit on the seat. It requires me to lift my foot, draw my leg back towards the seat to raise my foot to engage the pedal on the brake pad. On the other hand, the forward and reverse directional pedals are easily operated by placing my heel on the platform pad and simply pivoting my foot left and right for the directional changes.

I think the difference in the way the directional pedals operate, verses the brake pedal, its prudent to practice pushing the brake pedal smoothly and without an anxious response.

Thank You, Upset264 for this important reminder. Glad you are safe, the tractor isn't damaged and the maple tree now has something to talk about when all of its related seedlings drop in later this year.....;)............... You truly have done every SCUT / CUT operator a very valuable and perhaps even a life altering service even if it is by simply making them think about how they would respond in this situation................
 
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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
How do you like those 3" spacers? Do they give you more stability and a secure feeling when you are using the tractor?
Yes, they definitely make me feel more secure.
 
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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
My ballast box when I got it was full of gravel. I found this is not near dense enough and raises the center of gravity. I cleaned it all out, and filled with lead on the bottom and steel on top of that. Now it is only 2/3rds full but weighs a LOT more lowering the center of gravity.

You mentioned the 4WD fighting you. Were you on pavement?
Yes. Short trip, maybe 100 feet from the fill pile to the dump site. Fill pile in field, down paved driveway onto grass then to work site.
 

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2020 1025R, 120R, 54D
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I've gone through all the should haves twenty times, so I really don't need to hear them again.
Humm, guess people don't read or understand the words.
Glad it turned out OK.
 

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Humm, guess people don't read or understand the words.
Glad it turned out OK.
“Don’t wanna hear it” posts are not just going to get “glad your OK” responses all the time. This IS the internet 😬
 
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