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Ok I did a bone headed thing. I could have sworn I heard that the 1025R used 7 quarts of oil instead of the 2.7q it actually used. So I massively over filled it. When I started the engine it immediately started blowing massive amounts of smoke. Now comes the scary part. I immediately turned the key off but the engine wouldn't shut off. The garage filled up with solid smoke. Couldn't see. Frantically cycled the key on an off. Dashboard would turn off but engine kept running. Engine did eventually turn off after a very stressful 5 or 6 minutes. I cleaned up all the splattered oil and I'm working on healing my bruised ego. I've emptied the oil again out of caution. I should be good now when I add the correct 2.7q now. Going to change out all the filters and I'm expecting oil will still be in the exhaust so going to restart it outside since it will probably smoke for a little while as the oil burns off.

Question I have, Anyone have an opinion on why the engine didn't shut off when I turned the key off? That was pretty scary. started to worry about a fire.
 

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Ok I did a bone headed thing. I could have sworn I heard that the 1025R used 7 quarts of oil instead of the 2.7q it actually used. So I massively over filled it. When I started the engine it immediately started blowing massive amounts of smoke. Now comes the scary part. I immediately turned the key off but the engine wouldn't shut off. The garage filled up with solid smoke. Couldn't see. Frantically cycled the key on an off. Dashboard would turn off but engine kept running. Engine did eventually turn off after a very stressful 5 or 6 minutes. I cleaned up all the splattered oil and I'm working on healing my bruised ego. I've emptied the oil again out of caution. I should be good now when I add the correct 2.7q now. Going to change out all the filters and I'm expecting oil will still be in the exhaust so going to restart it outside since it will probably smoke for a little while as the oil burns off.

Question I have, Anyone have an opinion on why the engine didn't shut off when I turned the key off? That was pretty scary. started to worry about a fire.
It didn't cut off because it was running on oil.
 

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The engine was running off of the excess oil. Diesels will happily burn oil, essentially that’s exactly what diesel fuel is, oil.

At long as the engine didn’t overspeed or hydro-lock, you should be ok.
 

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Similar to a diesel runaway, oil gets into the combustion chamber and feeds the engine. The oil gets in for various reasons of things breaking. In your case the oil was so over full the oil ring on the piston couldn't wipe away the excess oil and what was left was enough to keep the engine running. Switching off by the key just shuts the injectors down, oil in cylinder is still feeding it.

The only way to stop a runaway diesel is to cut off the air, like blocking the intake. But runaways are usually reving at really high rpms, and most people would be afraid of the engine exploding because of the super high rpms, so most would keep a safe distance.

As mentioned, as long as your engine didn't overspeed to break something, you should be OK after you drop the oil level.

Just my 2 cents.

If you want to learn about diesel runaway, google it, there are a lot of videos.
 

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Good thing on the 1025 is no DPF. If you start burning oil on an engine with a DPF it can really make a mess of the after treatment system
 

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Similar to a diesel runaway, oil gets into the combustion chamber and feeds the engine. The oil gets in for various reasons of things breaking. In your case the oil was so over full the oil ring on the piston couldn't wipe away the excess oil and what was left was enough to keep the engine running. Switching off by the key just shuts the injectors down, oil in cylinder is still feeding it.

The only way to stop a runaway diesel is to cut off the air, like blocking the intake. But runaways are usually reving at really high rpms, and most people would be afraid of the engine exploding because of the super high rpms, so most would keep a safe distance.

As mentioned, as long as your engine didn't overspeed to break something, you should be OK after you drop the oil level.

Just my 2 cents.

If you want to learn about diesel runaway, google it, there are a lot of videos.
I don't think the term 'similar' is very useful here. I think that what OP had was a runaway, plain and simple. In this case, the OP was running basically 2 gallons of oil in his tiny engine ( I think the 1025R engine is a 1.2 liter?) Thats a massive amount of oil. I think the oil simply had no choice but to be pushed past the rings and be burned in the cylinder. In my early days I put too much oil in an old flathead briggs, and it did the same thing, except it obviously shut off when I wanted it to. Oil will absolutely get past the rings if given the chance.

i'd say that the OP got lucky, because a lot of times when diesels run away, they explode and are destroyed.
 

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You own a tractor, read your manual. If you don’t have one get both the op and the serv. It will help you a lot and prevent a lot of ,”mis haps”.
 

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Similar to a diesel runaway, oil gets into the combustion chamber and feeds the engine. The oil gets in for various reasons of things breaking. In your case the oil was so over full the oil ring on the piston couldn't wipe away the excess oil and what was left was enough to keep the engine running. Switching off by the key just shuts the injectors down, oil in cylinder is still feeding it.

The only way to stop a runaway diesel is to cut off the air, like blocking the intake. But runaways are usually reving at really high rpms, and most people would be afraid of the engine exploding because of the super high rpms, so most would keep a safe distance.

As mentioned, as long as your engine didn't overspeed to break something, you should be OK after you drop the oil level.

Just my 2 cents.

If you want to learn about diesel runaway, google it, there are a lot of videos.
The old supercharged 2 cycle Detroit Diesels were known for this.
And the sound of a runaway engine is one thing, but the sound of a runaway 2 cycle really jump starts the adrenaline!!!
 

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Welcome ffbobbob, that's a heck of a thing to make your first post about. Glad things didn't get too out of hand!!
 

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The old supercharged 2 cycle Detroit Diesels were known for this.
And the sound of a runaway engine is one thing, but the sound of a runaway 2 cycle really jump starts the adrenaline!!!
I worked for Power Products / Detroit Diesel in the early '70's. Been around a few runaways. Definitely exciting!!! Usually due to a stuck rack for various reasons. Open the hood and hit the air shut-off unless of course it was a cabover and that took a while.

Never had one blow-up but others who I'd worked with had experienced the carnage.
 

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Glad to hear the ones who know about diesel engines answered your question ..


and

Welcome from Preston County, West Virginia

:wgtt:
 

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It's all over now and ended well but going forward, no matter how much oil you think is needed for an oil change, get in the habit of ALWAYS checking the dipstick after refilling, then run the engine a minute or two and then recheck the dipstick after a few minutes. The first dipstick check would have revealed the overfill.
 

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The old supercharged 2 cycle Detroit Diesels were known for this.
And the sound of a runaway engine is one thing, but the sound of a runaway 2 cycle really jump starts the adrenaline!!!

Back nearly 40 years ago, in my days of working for an excavation company, we had lots of equipment with Detroit Diesels in them 4l-53, 6v-53, 6l-71, 8v-71. They all had a very distinctive sound. I can't imagine the sound of one of the running away. The little 6v-53 used to just scream...

One of our competitors used to have a 12v-92T in a Peterbuilt semi for pulling a lowboy trailer... That was awesome sounding!!
 

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ErikR,

There is no sweeter sound than that of a good running 8V-92 Detroit Diesel just floating up through the gears. :bigthumb:

Having said that, the smaller Detroit's running at full bore would just scream. :quiet:

Dave
 

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My dad taught me when I was a wee-one that you drain the oil out into a bucket, and you see how much came out. Our drain bucket had lines on it marked for every quart. That much goes back in, and then you check the stick and adjust accordingly.

I don't trust "specifications" for how much oil a machine takes, I've seen manuals say 5 qt when the engine only took 4 qt.

"Trust, but verify."
 

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It was mentioned that the ignition will turn off the fuel flow but wasn't mentioned is the other part of the diesel engine and how it is unique. With a gas engine there are spark plugs so the ignition turns off the power to the coils as well. There are no spark plugs with a diesel. There are glow plugs but they just heat the cylinder when it is a cold start to get things going. Diesel engines operate simply based on compression. As you squeeze the air it heats up. The diesel fuel is injected into the cylinder on modern diesels and the air temp after being compressed is so high that the diesel fuel is at a flash point and ignites. That is why glow plugs are there just to help get things going. Since all the engine needs to run is fuel air and heat. It provides the heat from the compression stroke you provided the fuel in this case oil after the fuel pump was turned off, and the intake wasn't blocked so air was getting in, it makes sense that the engine continued to run until the oil was largely consumed.

From here there is no way to tell if there is damage. As far as the filters, you can change them but I doubt any are bad. Unless oil got on the air filter maybe from a breather hose but I doubt that. You should be able to inspect it. A new oil filter is cheap but I would be surprised if anything happened to that. I would inspect those things, get it to the right level and fire it up and see. You may get a lot of smoke again but it should calm down if nothing is damaged which we can't tell from here.
 

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We currently have a guy on our Colorado forums who filled the diesel tank with DEF. Bottom line, truck ran like crap for an hour, they shut off and lit up the dashboard like a Christmas tree. It was under warranty (less than 6 months old( and GM wouldn't help him.

Thus,last he reported back,he was up to $11 K in repairs as the entire fuel system had to be replaced (DEF is HIGHLY corrosive)

Just be careful putting your fluids in.....most of the time, draining the fluid will usually fix your machine with zero long lasting problems......definitely not true if you make a mistake with DER.
 

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I don't think the term 'similar' is very useful here. I think that what OP had was a runaway, plain and simple. In this case, the OP was running basically 2 gallons of oil in his tiny engine ( I think the 1025R engine is a 1.2 liter?) Thats a massive amount of oil. I think the oil simply had no choice but to be pushed past the rings and be burned in the cylinder. In my early days I put too much oil in an old flathead briggs, and it did the same thing, except it obviously shut off when I wanted it to. Oil will absolutely get past the rings if given the chance.

i'd say that the OP got lucky, because a lot of times when diesels run away, they explode and are destroyed.

I agree that the OP was VERY lucky, but the post didn't say if the engine was overspeeding for the 5-6 minutes before it stopped. I can see 2 scenarios, one where the engine was indeed going "full throttle plus" until something broke and it stopped, or two, if it was running at some speed in the "normal operating range" until the oil level was low enough and the engine stopped of its own accord.

So was it a runaway ... in technical terms YES, so I agree with that. Typical runaways that I have read about and seen on Youtube typically end in a catastrophe because there is a large amount of uncontrolled oil going into the cylinder. Engine is running at above redline until something like a rod breaks, or it runs out of oil.

If the OP's engine just ran for the several minutes then he may have had just enough overfill to slip past the rings to maintain the "runaway" for several minutes. Then the level dropped enough to where the rings could do their job. A lot of factors to consider, but whenever you can't turn off a diesel then I guess it is a runaway.

I see that the OP hasn't posted anything since the first post ... I hope he does.

Whatever, putting in more than 2X amount of oil is never a good thing.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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We currently have a guy on our Colorado forums who filled the diesel tank with DEF. Bottom line, truck ran like crap for an hour, they shut off and lit up the dashboard like a Christmas tree. It was under warranty (less than 6 months old( and GM wouldn't help him.

Thus,last he reported back,he was up to $11 K in repairs as the entire fuel system had to be replaced (DEF is HIGHLY corrosive)

Just be careful putting your fluids in.....most of the time, draining the fluid will usually fix your machine with zero long lasting problems......definitely not true if you make a mistake with DER.
That's a lot of DEF!
 
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