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Discussion Starter #1
I will be running long runs of electrical and water supply from one barn to another...probably about 500 feet distance. I would like to use my 85 horsepower JD for this and was thinking about something like the TSC Subsoiler....a very small deep plow that is just dragged behind and supposedly carves a trench in the ground. Soil is dense clay in Georgia. Any advice on what to use and tips for making the job go better? Am thinking if I just buy the subsoiler from Tractor Supply it will break off since my tractor is way over-rated for it.
 

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Can your subsoiler go deep enough? Will you need to connect pipe in the trench?

The TSC subsoiler is only about 2" wide, and I don't know if it can go deep enough to get below the frost line, especially on a bigger tractor. I can pretty much guarantee that the cat I TSC unit will bend behind your tractor if you hit any unexpected obstacles. It's built fine, but too light for an 80+ hp machine.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I was going to go with one continuous run of pipe and cable. Going to use a roll of 3/4" PEX. So I dont need to access the trench to make a connection.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
And to clarify, I do not actually have the TSC subsoiler...was just referring to that as an option or maybe something like that but heavier duty but not sure if that is available.
 

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This is easy to do with a subsoiler,,,
simply trench several times progressively deeper with a subsoiler/pipe layer.

After several passes, and you are satisfied you are deep enough the ENTIRE length,,
come back and feed in the pipe/wire.

I built one, and have laid hundreds of feet of waterline with it,

It is VERY satisfying to have to "grub out" a rock that is encountered,,
then the next pass, go right through that area!!:thumbup1gif:
 

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Couple things to think about:
Are you doing this with or without a building permit? If with a permit, the inspector may have to see the trench and the depth for the electrical will have to meet code (could be 18-24 inches).
I've used one of those walk-behind trenchers and it worked pretty good.
It would be a good idea to lay detection tape in the trench -- it's only about $30 for 1,000 feet.
 

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I had to go back up and see the OP's location. For a water line around here nothing less than a backhoe as it has to be at least 36" depth (40" preferably).
 
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Looks like your frost line in GA could be as deep as 30" depending on where you're located. Do you intend to blow the lines out in winter or will you want water all year round? Backhoe or trencher may be the only answer for water lines.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Looks like your frost line in GA could be as deep as 30" depending on where you're located. Do you intend to blow the lines out in winter or will you want water all year round? Backhoe or trencher may be the only answer for water lines.
I will need water year round for the horses we're going to put out there.
 

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Hire or rent a smaller directional drill. Ditch Witch, Vermeer. Auger a 30inch hole at your water locations. Drill and pull back the lines.

With the horizontal drill, You can go under fences, etc. No backfilling, no ground settling. About 10x faster than excavating, and usually the same cost per yard as tradional excavating.

Its never a good idea to only go just deep enough, I would go much deeper than 30", So you don't have to worry about ground engaging tools from damaging your lines, pounding frost in from vehicle traffic.
 
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