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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys,

At our new place in Saskatchewan we have an unfinished round top quonset that has 4.5" laminate trusses. It's not insulated and has 10'x12' sliding doors front and back. The back portion has 2 nice box stalls, so I will remain as the 'horse area', but I'd like to finish the front 1/2. There is a nice concrete slab in the front 1/2, and plank flooring in the horse section.

I'm wondering what you all think about insulating, vapor barrier-ing, and sheeting the interior of the front half, and building an insulated dividing wall between the front and back. I'm also thinking of putting a nice (and nice sealing) 10'x12' overhead door on the front, and putting in radiant heat.

Is 4.5" of insulation enough, or am I trying to seal up a building that was not ever meant to be used as a nice, sealed, space??

Appreciate your thoughts,

-Jer.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
OK, i'll get 'em later.

-Jer.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Here are some pics of the Quonset in Question.....
 

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I'd say that what you want to accomplish is doable. I don't see why batt insulation can't be installed between the trusses; but gravity is going to want to pull the stuff down as it transitions from the vertical wall to the roof. What do you plan to put over the insulation and vapor barrier to keep it tight to the structure and protected from shop activities? As for the amount of insulation, how warm do you plan to keep the building? You could always add non-structural framing to make the cavities for insulation deeper.

Since it's a wood structure, constructing a wood dividing wall will be relatively easy.

Since you want to put in radiant heat, I'm assuming you're looking at the overhead gas fired tubes, which I think would be OK for your application. Just make sure you have the overhead space needed for proper installation, which it appears you do.

Since the building is sheathed in wood, I'm assuming it uses regular asphalt/fiberglass roofing shingles. Am I correct?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'd say that what you want to accomplish is doable. I don't see why batt insulation can't be installed between the trusses; but gravity is going to want to pull the stuff down as it transitions from the vertical wall to the roof. What do you plan to put over the insulation and vapor barrier to keep it tight to the structure and protected from shop activities?
Something with some flex... plywood or OSB? I doubt drywall will flex without cracking.

As for the amount of insulation, how warm do you plan to keep the building? You could always add non-structural framing to make the cavities for insulation deeper.
I'd keep it just above zero all the time, and turn up the heat an hour or so before i head out there to work. A false ceiling did cross my mind, maybe at 10' or 12'? That way I could blow in fibreglass fluff insulation.

Since it's a wood structure, constructing a wood dividing wall will be relatively easy.
Yep, I think even I can handle that.

Since you want to put in radiant heat, I'm assuming you're looking at the overhead gas fired tubes, which I think would be OK for your application. Just make sure you have the overhead space needed for proper installation, which it appears you do.
That's exactly what I'm hoping to do.

Since the building is sheathed in wood, I'm assuming it uses regular asphalt/fiberglass roofing shingles. Am I correct?
Yep. If the shingles ever need replacing I'd like to go to black tin.

Thanks for the advice.

-Jer.
 

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Jer,
Is spray in foam insulation available and affordable in your area? Around here it has become pretty fairly priced.

If you could use that it opens the door to using different materials to cover it.
 

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It is available, and I think it's pretty reasonable.

Will it adhere to an upside-down surface??

Have any of you used it?? Is the R-Value decent?? I bet it seals everything up nicely. Does one need vapor barrier is you go that route?

-Jer.
 

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Something with some flex... plywood or OSB? I doubt drywall will flex without cracking.

Thanks for the advice.

-Jer.
You're welcome. I don't think drywall would be a wise choice because it's so easily damaged. Whatever you choose will need to be scored on the backside to flex, or you have to go the narrow lath boards route to make the curve. Or you could build a sheathing frame that attaches to the existing trusses to give you a faceted look inside. This would allow you to fasten the OSB/plywood horizontally and take advantage of the 4' width. Also, you'll get more cavity space for insulation.

I think the spray in foam Brian suggested would be your best bet insulation wise if its affordable.

Another suggestion is you might get a structural engineer to take a look at the framing and make sure it can handle the extra weight of insulation and sheathing. It looks stout enough to me; but I'm not a structural engineer.
 

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I've got Sealection 500 open cell foam in both my house and my tractor garage. The R value is within about 5% of fiberglass. The big win with the foam is that it seals up things very tightly. The open cell can hold water, so that is a minus. The plus is that it stays flexible so as the wood and structure move it does not loose it's adhesion to the wood. You can spray it on a roof and it will stick and stay OK. If you want more than 3-4 inches, they have to do two passes where they just spray an area, wait a minute, then put on the next coat.

Down here in North Carolina, you can not use the foam on a ceiling unless the roof is metal. The building inspector said it was all about keeping things cool. With a shingle roof, it just got too hot. So check that in your area. You might be able to foam the walls, then frame in your 12' ceiling and use blown insulation there. You'd want some way to protect the edge of the foam at the foam-fiberglass interface to keep it from getting wet.

The foam degrades under UV light. For my tractor garage, I painted the ceiling white to protect the foam. The walls were 7/16" OSB. In the basement of my house, I'll be spraying some white paint someday soon to protect a small area of the bands (area where the floor joists are on the basement wall header). The light from the outside is starting to turn the foam a darker shade of yellow.

There's a thread on TBN about building my "30 x 40 tractor garage".

Best of luck, insulated is good :good2:

Pete
 

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So what ever happened with this project? Closed cell would have been my choice for a variety of reasons, but I am interested to see a picture or here what you eventually did.
 
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