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I unfortunately discovered that I have a huge Yellow Jacket infestation in the center of a large bush. The bush is about 24" around at the base and the base is packed about 8" deep with years of dead leaves and debris. Most of the bee activity seems to be concentrated near the center of the debris. I figure the hole is located somewhere UNDER the dense leaves and debris which makes precise location of the hole nearly impossible.

I tried dousing the area with bee-killing insecticide then later flooding the whole area at night for about 20 mins and both was totally ineffective.

This evening I took a long pole and agitated the leaves in the center of the bush and that resulted in a huge swarm of bees all around the base of the bush.

I've taken care of Yellow Jackets in the past but in those cases the hole in the ground was in a clear area so it was easy to fill with kerosene, light, and enjoy the show.

I'm thinking I may have no choice but to soak the base of the bush with kerosene and do an initial burn to see if it either kills them or reveals the hole. The bush is out in the middle of the yard away from everything and I'm not concerned about saving the bush as it is an eyesore.

Does anyone have any alternative words of wisdom before I embark on my fire bombing mission?
 

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Burn, baby, burn.

Soak it real good and light it off. Should take care of most, if not all of them.

If possible do it when it is a bit chilly out as they are a bit less lethal (i.e. slower moving) when cold.
 

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Get a chemical called Sevin. At any lawn shop its kills bees real fast. Wife mowed over some last year and what a mess.
 

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We usually have a nest or two here each year. This year I used a product that foamed up upon application. Works pretty good. The foaming action expands inside the hole so no matter where they step, they get coated.
 

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I feel for ya', I have been trying to clean up parts of my property and I am now a little apprehensive, having uncovered several nests of those suckers.

One nest I "found" when moving some old firewood, pissed them off, got stung 12 times.

Found another 2 weeks later when I was weedwacking some underbrush, got stung 16 times there, thought at first I had just kicked some debris at my arm with the trimmer. Had to slam some benadryl for a couple of days, right arm took 8 hits and remained swollen for a week.

Each time I was covered head to toe with yellow jackets, smacking them like crazy as I ran up the driveway to the garage (kind of like in the cartoons). For each of those nests I sprayed several cans of the off the shelf killer, seems to have done the job, but on those nests I knew where the hole was.

I'm trying to find something that I can spray over a large area, so that if there are any nests they can be neutralized. I'm tired of finding them after the attack.

I may just hold off on any more clearing until winter, maybe freezing weather will keep them in their homes.
 

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Light it up. You don't need our permission. lol
The fire should get rid of all 3 problems. Leaves, bees & bush.
 

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If you want the bush gone, then light it up I guess. If it were me and they were away from people, I'd just let it sit. Then during the winter, clean up all the leaf debris to discourage them from coming back next year. Unfortunately I don't have a miracle cure, I usually have success with multiple applications of bee spray. Good Luck:thumbup1gif:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
We usually have a nest or two here each year. This year I used a product that foamed up upon application. Works pretty good. The foaming action expands inside the hole so no matter where they step, they get coated.
My problem is that due to all of the debris in the bush it is impossible to locate the hole.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I feel for ya', I have been trying to clean up parts of my property and I am now a little apprehensive, having uncovered several nests of those suckers.
What is weird is I have trimmed this bush several times this year without incident and then about a month ago I went to nip two little shooters off the top and suddenly two bees came flying out at my head, bounced off the underside of my hat and went behind my glasses. I got stung on the puffy part under one eye and right above the other eye. Then as I turned to exit one got me in the back. My eyes were so swollen I could hardly see for about 4 days.

That's when I started to plan the fire mission. :)
 

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What is weird is I have trimmed this bush several times this year without incident and then about a month ago I went to nip two little shooters off the top and suddenly two bees came flying out at my head, bounced off the underside of my hat and went behind my glasses. I got stung on the puffy part under one eye and right above the other eye. Then as I turned to exit one got me in the back. My eyes were so swollen I could hardly see for about 4 days.

That's when I started to plan the fire mission. :)
After that one situation I feel your pain, if you don't mind loosing the bush and it's not a fire hazard to other parts of the property I'd definitely torch it. We have been getting some brisk mornings, you could try and dig it out then.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
After that one situation I feel your pain, if you don't mind loosing the bush and it's not a fire hazard to other parts of the property I'd definitely torch it. We have been getting some brisk mornings, you could try and dig it out then.
Unfortunately I think I'd need a backhoe to dig out this beast. It's been there for 40 years.
 

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Unfortunately I think I'd need a backhoe to dig out this beast. It's been there for 40 years.
Then a good old fashioned burning seems to be in order. :good2:
 

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What is weird is I have trimmed this bush several times this year without incident and then about a month ago I went to nip two little shooters off the top and suddenly two bees came flying out at my head, bounced off the underside of my hat and went behind my glasses. I got stung on the puffy part under one eye and right above the other eye. Then as I turned to exit one got me in the back. My eyes were so swollen I could hardly see for about 4 days.

That's when I started to plan the fire mission. :)
Wow, that had to hurt like the dickens. If I had the miracle solution I'd share but other than what the others have said I have nothing new to try. Good luck.
 

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Burning them will not get rid of them all. The fire will only reach down an inch or so and will burn the bush to the ground. Which is what may have to happen to get to them. These guys build deep into the ground and can get very large in size. If you do not care for the bush, I say light it off let it burn to the ground. Leave it alone for a while as they will be rather pissed for a day or two. Then one night or late in the evening when it is cool, pour some kerosene or diesel fuel down the hole soaking it. Then light it off. I have a rather large nest of them in a bush at my house and am waiting for late fall to dig them up with the BH. I found another one at our cabin in the middle of the yard. I set a chair on it so I know where they are. Waiting for cool weather to pour some diesel down the hole. The foaming spray I hear also works very well as mentioned earlier. Either way good luck. It's that time of year the pollen gets scarce and they get an attitude on anything that moves close to them.
 

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Seeing as you don't want the bush any more I'd douse it with gas where you think the hole is and all over the area just to make sure I got the right spot. 2 or 3 gallons should do it. I'd also do it at late evening so you catch most of them in the nest. Let it sit all night. There shouldn't be any left the next morning. I'm sure some of the gas would get into the hole and the fumes will kill them. Next day I'd wrap a chain around the base of the bush and pull it out.

I know it's fun watching them burn after getting stung but the fumes will kill all of them and that's what I go for now days. Pay back is a b....
I got rid of 2 nests in the ground this year doing it this way. You want to kill the queen and the fumes will do it. If you don't light it up the worker bees will come back into the hole and then they die from the fumes too. Good luck!
 

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I got stung on the puffy part under one eye and right above the other eye. Then as I turned to exit one got me in the back. My eyes were so swollen I could hardly see for about 4 days.
Not been a good year for me either as far as stings. After the first attack of 12 yellow jackets, I got stung by a wasp on the back of the neck a week later. Then a few days later got stung by another wasp on the left eyebrow that caused the whole eye area to swell. Then it was the YJ attack of 16.
 

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I got hit 2 separate times on a bike. Below the eye and back of the neck. Not fun either time.

We were at an HVAC supply house Monday. I made sure we got 2 cans of CRC wasp & hornet killer.

Burn it to the ground. Then fill the hole with molten aluminum.
 

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