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Our new 60' x 24' pole shed now sits next to our little barn. The shed will store hay for my wife's horses, and give shelter to two green tractors and a bunch of implements. No insulation, road crush gravel floor, and yet to be wired and lighted. We made it tall for the delivery of 160 square bales by a self-unloading truck-load. Equipment

I'm looking for wisdom about lining the interior with another layer - lumber or plywood, if anything?
I'm thinking it would strengthen the walls against accidental damage (hay spears, pallet forks, etc?).


One local suggestion was use horizontal 2x12's screwed to the poles, and make a solid wall up to about 10 feet high. Another was to use horizontal 2x6's, but stagger them to save money.

(I'd also like add some pallet shelves to one wall so I can rack some implements. Eventually I hope to have an actual heated workshop, but that will be few years away.)

Thanks in advance!

==Grizzler
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Some more pics, including the weathervane I picked for my wife's Christmas present last year.
==Grizzler
 

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I lined mine with OSB sheeting.

Daughter helping:
DSC09222.JPG

DSC09216.JPG
 

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2 x 6

I like the idea of the 2 x 6 but would probably space them a few inches apart unless you just like spending :gizmo: . It's pretty easy to shove a hay bale just a little too far and potentially bulge a wall. I think spaced boards would prevent that. You could do solid up to the height of the forks to be sure you don't stick a fork through the side but I think you can avoid that issue by careful driving.

Really nice shed, congratulations! :bigthumb:
 

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I like the idea of the 2 x 6 but would probably space them a few inches apart unless you just like spending :gizmo: . It's pretty easy to shove a hay bale just a little too far and potentially bulge a wall. I think spaced boards would prevent that. You could do solid up to the height of the forks to be sure you don't stick a fork through the side but I think you can avoid that issue by careful driving.

Really nice shed, congratulations? :bigthumb:
Especially for hay storage and possible moisture build up.
 

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Osb works great and adds a ton of strength to the building. I think the 2x6 would look tacky and leave to many voids for things to drop down and inbetween. Nice place for a mouse hangout or other rodents

Brett
 

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Where you stack the round bales, you do not need an additional wall, but where you are getting square bales that is being unloaded by a truck, you will need an additional wall. That way, the truck can push the square bales against it and have a firm stack when the truck pulls out from under the stack. My brothers and I have been doing the same thing for at least 20yrs. I never had a problem with the round bales or the square bales. The wall for the square bales is made by fastening 2x8 to the wood posts horizontally about 2' o/c apart to wherever the height of the stack is going to be. We then fastened 2x6 vertically to the outside of the 2x8, placed about 16" apart o/c. I would use a New Holland 1046 Stackcruiser to unload square bales against the wall and never had an issue. Just use common sense and not push so hard against the wall, like you are trying to drive thru it. On the round bales, I stood them up on end for the first row, then place the second and third normally(horizontal). I would always keep at least a foot away from the wall with the round bales. Let us know what you end up doing, as I am curious on how others are doing it.

Great looking shed!!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the great advice!

Great to learn from all your experiences, thank you everyone!

Due to space constraints, we built narrower than I would have liked, which is why I'm paranoid about the possibility of damage. We will reinforce the walls, allow ventilation, and unload very carefully!

==Grizzler

Where you stack the round bales, you do not need an additional wall, but where you are getting square bales that is being unloaded by a truck, you will need an additional wall. That way, the truck can push the square bales against it and have a firm stack when the truck pulls out from under the stack. My brothers and I have been doing the same thing for at least 20yrs. I never had a problem with the round bales or the square bales. The wall for the square bales is made by fastening 2x8 to the wood posts horizontally about 2' o/c apart to wherever the height of the stack is going to be. We then fastened 2x6 vertically to the outside of the 2x8, placed about 16" apart o/c. I would use a New Holland 1046 Stackcruiser to unload square bales against the wall and never had an issue. Just use common sense and not push so hard against the wall, like you are trying to drive thru it. On the round bales, I stood them up on end for the first row, then place the second and third normally(horizontal). I would always keep at least a foot away from the wall with the round bales. Let us know what you end up doing, as I am curious on how others are doing it.

Great looking shed!!
 

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I asked for input from Morton buildings and Leslie buildings when building my two pole barns. I learned what they do and the most practical solution is to go OSB board or plywood to a height of 4 feet. That is where any damage would occur from moving around equipment etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the advice! We decided from the above ideas to start boarding up the south wall of our new shed, where the hay bales will go. We used 2 x 8 x 8' spruce on 16-inch centers, to a height of almost 11 feet. The horizontal gaps are 12 inches, which should hold back any small square bales that tumble while being delivered. I put in two rows of large round bales to make a backstop for the truckload of small square bales (due later this week or next).

On the north side where the implements will be stored I may continue with the same plan, but add some OSB or plywood to a height of four feet.

Now - does anyone have advice (photos) about the feasibility of pallet racks?

Hay shed south side.JPG

Hay shed moving round bales in.jpg

Hay shed round bales.jpg
 

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nice looking building:bigthumb: If you plan to heat the building in the future, don't completely seal off interior walls until you insulate them with Dow foam board or fiberglass insulation. By what you have done you can still get walls insulated.
 

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Love my pallet racks. Found them on Craigslist. Some local lumberyards may have some excess or retired for sale too. This photo was when I first started setting them up. They are loaded to the ceiling now. I use that yellow HVAC hand crank forklift to access the pallets. It will lift ~600 lbs.
doo-lift (2).jpg
 

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Nice building. Congrats.

You need a vapor barrier for your ceiling. Your building will start to rain on you without it. You probably already know this, but if you have wet hay inside, even with good ventilation, it can create condensation on the inside ceiling and walls as the bales release moisture and dry out. Also, with frost in the morning and then sun during the day, that will also create condensation issues. This all depends on climate, but at some point just the right combination will cause this issue.

I used silver bubble insulation up against the metal (for a vapor barrier only) and eliminated my condensation issues. Be careful with fiberglass. If it gets wet, it's useless and in metal buildings, without a vapor barrier, it will get wet. Foam is awesome, but it's expensive.
 

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Now - does anyone have advice (photos) about the feasibility of pallet racks?
My pallet racks were at a scrap yard, they are take-outs from a Lowes remodel.
I painted over the gray with black.



This pic shows a full sheet of plywood used as a shelf.



The shelving material is not necessary,, large items can just set on 2X4's that are positioned front to back.

I purchased the pallet racks in 2001,, I have about 80 feet, minus what I have re-used, or gave away.

I have had over 2,000 pounds per shelf on these racks,, CRAZY strong!! :good2:
 
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