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Discussion Starter #1
Two main ones really...this maybe a stupid one, but the voltage requirement says 120/240...that means it can run on either right? I'm trying to avoid getting a unit that requires that I install a 220V outlet. Am I correct to assume that this unit will run on a standard outlet that I have in my garage?

Husky 2.0 Running HP 30 Gallon Vertical Compressor - VT6315 at The Home Depot
2nd question. What's the benefit of a unit that uses oil vs one that's oil-less?

There's a decent amount of savings going with an oil-less unit, but I don't want to skimp if it means lesser quality.

Any advice is much appreciated
 

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Yes, you can use a standard 110 outlet unless the amp draw is more than 20. The advantage to 240 is less current (amps) is needed to run the compressor as the pressure (volts) is higher. Generally a 240 machine will draw 1/2 the current of a 110 machine. To go to 240 requires a plug change and some tinkering of the wiring in the motor. The owner's manual should detail how to do that. I run mine on 110.

As for the oil vs. oil-less units; I'll defer to others who have used both as mine is oil-less.
 

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Mjncad nailed the electrical, I myself have not owned an oiless unit. However, I have not heard any good things about them. I myself would avoid the oiless. I guess my feeling is that "you get what you pay for".
 

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Oiless meens LOUD! They are twice as loud as oiled units, and their life is shorter. What do you need the AC for?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I need one to use for an impact wrench and for a paint gun that I have yet to buy. I like reastoring old tractors and I am going to try to do more myself.
 

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I need one to use for an impact wrench and for a paint gun that I have yet to buy. I like reastoring old tractors and I am going to try to do more myself.
Painting takes a lot of clean DRY air. You will probably be unhappy trying to paint a tractor with a 30 gallon single stage compressor.
 

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Ok, I've got to get an air compressor sometime this winter and get it installed. Am torn between a 3HP or 5HP. It will be a 240V unit. From everything I've read, it will take the larger 5HP to have the volume/pressure needed for painting?

I know the HP is a nebulous figure, so anything more explicite (xxx cfm with a xxx gal tank) would be good.

Pete
 

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Ok, I've got to get an air compressor sometime this winter and get it installed. Am torn between a 3HP or 5HP. It will be a 240V unit. From everything I've read, it will take the larger 5HP to have the volume/pressure needed for painting?

I know the HP is a nebulous figure, so anything more explicite (xxx cfm with a xxx gal tank) would be good.

Pete
5HP, 2-stage, 80 gallon tank. You won't run out of air that way. 15 to 20 CFM at 90 PSI is a good compressor.
 

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5HP, 2-stage, 80 gallon tank. You won't run out of air that way. 15 to 20 CFM at 90 PSI is a good compressor.
:good2:I agree Kenny. I have a 5HP 2-stage 80 gal compressor and it does everything very well except the sand blasting. Sand blasting is the real air hog.
 

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The 80 gallon tank seems to take everything up a notch. Northern has little in that size.

Comments on these:

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_211720_211720

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200365171_200365171

http://www.tractorsupply.com/tools/air-compressors-air-tools-accessories/air-compressors/80-gallon-2-stage-air-compressor-5-hp-3496129

As you may be able to tell, I'm not happy about things more than $1K. Seems like in the $1800 range, there's a lot of stuff but it's higher flows at 150+ PSI. That Deere unit would be sweet, but it's a big too much "green" for me...

While I'm at it, the compressor will be 60' away from the building, and I have to get the air via a 3" PVC pipe with some twists and turns. What size hose should I pull through the pipe? Once inside the garage, I used 1/2" copper to run the air lines.

Pete
 

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While I'm at it, the compressor will be 60' away from the building, and I have to get the air via a 3" PVC pipe with some twists and turns. What size hose should I pull through the pipe? Once inside the garage, I used 1/2" copper to run the air lines.
I know watching your pennies is everyones concern but I wouldn't be penny wise and dollar foolish. Like a tractor upgrade so is a compressor upgrade, costly. I never regret my decision on my compressor. Yes, the sand blasting does tax it but I could never visualize any thing smaller.

You may want to consider steel plumbing from the compressor. Here is a document that helped me make my decisions.
 

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I am a firm believer in copper for air lines. It goes together quicker with less chance of leaks that steel/iron pipe. My basement and garage are plumbed with 1/2" type M copper.

That said, when I put air out to my new pole barn 75' away, I used 5/8" ID rubber hose that I ordered from the Surplus Center that I placed through 2" conduit. The AC lives in my basement.

My compressor is from Home Depot, 5HP 2 stage 80 gallon rated at 15 CFM @ 90PSI, that was just about $1000.00 5 years ago. I may have bought a better one today since I know a little more and am building a blasting cabinet, but it has served me well. TSC also sells some nice IR units at decent prices.
 

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I am a firm believer in copper for air lines. It goes together quicker with less chance of leaks that steel/iron pipe. My basement and garage are plumbed with 1/2" type M copper.
I agree copper has its advantages, but the amount of plumbing that I have it really would have been cost prohibitive. I have 3/4" supply feeding seven 1/2" drops throught the shop. Another concern is water, I really thought I was going to have to install a dryer. But with the amount of pipe and proper filters it really is not a problem. The iron really does help a lot, particularly with sand blasting and paint. Now with that said I do have a couple of places where I tee'd off of that I did use copper. Just have to consider use, installation, and cost.

Oh, one more thing, of the seven drops five of them have auto retracting hose reels. They are slick and highly recommended. In fact I have one supplying water for vehicle washing.:good2:

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=317-7282&PMPXNO=19500687&PARTPG=INLMK32
 

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NEVER EVER NEVER NEVER Use PVC for Compressed air.
I've got a mixture of Copper & Polyurethane (Pretty sure its poly, but it could be nylon).

I started with Copper for the main lines and my garage feed from the basement, and then tee off and started using the Legris tubing for everything else...SUPER slick, designed for penumatics, and literally, you could plumb an entire garage in a few hours.
http://www.legris-pneumatics.com/

When I do my Garage, I dunno exactly what I'll do....but guaranteed it will be Copper and/or Polyurethane Tubing.

Rubber hose...I've always heard that You shouldnt use rubber hose for any "permanent" installation because there are some friction losses with longer lengths of hose. http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/air-hose-friction-d_1536.html

Its cheap & easy but there are correct products for the job at hand like Nylon or Polyurethane tubing. We all agree that garden hoses work great, but would you use one to plumb water to your garage?
 

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Pete...Comments on the compressors you listed...

-I personally dont mind the 999 IR from TSC, Seriously speaking, thats probably the one I'll be getting down the road...

Biggest things to watch out for on compressors is the motor and RPM. Theres not really much else to the rest of it, LOL.
The JD/MiTM unit is a low RPM unit...lasts forever, quieter, etc.. IR doesnt list the RPM....The motor on the JD/MiTM unit looks to be a superior motor. I did a quick google and the motor on the IR in question is not the best out there:
http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/showthread.php?t=757627&page=2

I know you cant judge a book by its cover...but look at the 5HP motor on the JD/MiTM and then look at the "5 HP" motor on the IR you linked....

Heres an IR with a better motor...notice the price:
http://www.aircompressorsdirect.com/Ingersoll-Rand-2475N5-Air-Compressor/p706.html
 

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Now...another option would be "DIY"...if you had access to motors and such cheaply... I could get all the 7.5hp 3ph motors I could shake a stick at for 25 bucks each, but 3ph does me no good...
But then, even DIY might be more money...might be "cheapest" to buy the $999 IR from TSC and when the motor burns up, repower it with a good motor....
80 Gal Tank only: http://www.compressorworld.com/80gallonverticalairtanks.aspx

Seriously speaking...looking around, if I had to buy one today, I'd prolly make a call and order up the JD one from my dealer.
 

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Interesting stuff on the motors. Emerson Electric anything has allays been marginal quality for the last 30 years. This sort of thing with the motor quality is very sad and a growing trend. This view is vindicated by the success of Harbor Freight.

While web searching compressors, I saw a herd of the $2K class compressors that were the 15-20 CFM at much higher pressure (150 to 180 PSI). The $1K ones look identical, they just have their flow specified at 90 PSI. So there must be very real differences in the motor and the compressor parts. It's hard to know how much of a difference that will make for infrequent use.

Right now, this morning, only 1st cup of coffee in, I'm thinking that the $1K compressor is a middle quality, and you almost never win buying middle quality. Currently, I have no air tools and use a 20 year old loud no belt oil-less wonder to blow stuff clean and fill tires. I'm thinking I'll get another one of those and put my money into the wire, piping, dryers, hose reels and the like. Then, when I go into some area where I need a "real" compressor pony up the $1800 to $2K to get a good one. Focus on good infrastructure now, focus on a good "engine" when there is a project that make me need it.

I'll try to find some of the polyurethane pipe.

It's hard to figure out you're level of involvement in various areas of life. Two years ago I popped $14K for an oscilloscope and it was an easy decision. But with the tractors and mechanical stuff, I'm much more of a casual user and the decisions are much harder. As I get older, my hands hurt more and that also limits what I want to take on. And I certainly don't want to bung up my hands enough I can't type well or work on small electronics stuff.

Oh well, it's still a good day if these are the worst problems one is facing. :morning2:

Pete
 

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right now I have an Ingersoll T30 engine driven compressor truck tire setup, 30 gallon tank with two stage 19 cu ft flow rating. I use this where portability is needed and have been well satisfied with it. For the new shop I am planning on an 80 gallon 5hp model that is similar. For painting I strongly recommend getting an optional dryer, much better than ruined paint. I also prefer the continuous duty rated motors. When I do purchase the compressor it will likely be another Ingersol Rand in an outside enclosure next to the shop building.
 
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