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So I was talking to my FIL today about tractors and tire pressure came up, he said the old farmer method for air pressure in loaded tires goes by the tire size. In other words, my new tractor has 12-16.5 rears, so he said I will want to be right around 16 to 17 pounds in them. Our White 2-85 has 22.5 tires and we run 22 lbs in them. Just a quick way to tell if you are running proper air pressure according to a wise old farmer. Makes sense to me because a farm tire guy loaded my tires and they have 17 lbs of air in them.
 

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A 70ish year old guy came out and put the fluid in these tires,,
he has been doing tractor tires a LONG time,,



He said the tires were properly inflated when 2 full tire bars were touching the ground,,
he did not use a gauge,,

After he left, I checked the tires height with a tape measure,,
both tires were identical height,,, :good2:

On the front tires, I run 45 psi,, because of the loader.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
A 70ish year old guy came out and put the fluid in these tires,,
he has been doing tractor tires a LONG time,,



He said the tires were properly inflated when 2 full tire bars were touching the ground,,
he did not use a gauge,,

After he left, I checked the tires height with a tape measure,,
both tires were identical height,,, :good2:

On the front tires, I run 45 psi,, because of the loader.
FIL also mentioned that rule for big tractors.
 

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Interesting.....

Air pressure is relative - it doesn’t care if the tires had fluid in them or not. 20psi is 20psi in an empty tire or loaded tire.

So I just go by the manual to start with and by the seat of my pants afterward. In the winter I keep 25# in my rear loaded tires which is close to what the manual suggests I think. In the summer since I use the tractor for mowing I go down to 10# which really helps with the ride.

I could probably leave them at 10# for the winter but I don’t want to take the chance of running a tire off the rim getting up against some ice or something. Plus the fact that as it gets colder the air pressure drops.

R4 tires have a heavy sidewall - don’t know how low you could go with a turf tire before you would have problems.
 

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I go by the manual if I have one but I was taught the tire size method as well. I have never had a problem useing that rule. On a truck or Jeep with over size tires I have used the dust or water on the concrete and set the pressure by the contact patch as well.
 

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I go by the manual if I have one but I was taught the tire size method as well. I have never had a problem useing that rule. On a truck or Jeep with over size tires I have used the dust or water on the concrete and set the pressure by the contact patch as well.
I’ve done the contact patch thing as well with oversize tires on my pickup.

I learned to do that with rubber tire rollers at work. They can have different amounts of balast according to the job at hand.

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