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Cub Cadet's big selling point is that they use a cast iron transmission. Seems like that is not a benefit to me? It would not dissipate heat like the aluminum would? Both would have to be sleeved for moving parts? Cast would weigh more? Why the benefit?
 

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Coming from an MF 1523, which was all aluminum, that was one of the reasons we traded up to the 1635 - CAST IRON. The aluminum is fine if you are only cutting residential, IMHO, but once you work it, whether it be a heavy trailer, or anything ground engaging, the cast aluminum is just not as strong.

Had a trumpet (axle) housing crack on the 1523, right where it went into the rear case, tractor had to be split, and trans case was also cracked too. Thankfully warranty covered it. Also, the stress of the mower deck can also contribute to this over time.

I like the Cub Cadet tractors, good for them.

Cast Iron all the way.
 

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I have seen quite a few threads about people breaking the 3 point tabs on the transmission case right off their tractors using a box blade. Cast Iron would have better strength to with hold that type of heavy work and if it did break it would be a lot easier to weld up the place that broke if it was in a less serious location. Also, you get more weight on the rear end which improves traction and makes the machine much more capable of doing ground engaging chores.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I need to clarify that these are lawn tractors, the JD X300 and the Cub 2000. There are no hydraulics or three point. Nothing but a mowing deck.
 

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I need to clarify that these are lawn tractors, the JD X300 and the Cub 2000. There are no hydraulics or three point. Nothing but a mowing deck.

Still prefer the cast iron. More weight, more traction. Better for pulling a trailer, or having attachments on the front.
 

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I vote for cast iron too as these are work machines; not cars trying to squeeze out every last little bit fuel efficiency and/or speed by shaving weight.

Using aluminum probably saves some in shipping costs, and I'd say one can get a closer tolerance casting requiring less finish machining using the die-cast method with aluminum versus the sand cast method with cast iron. However; do these possible cost savings outweigh the higher cost of aluminum is unknown to me.
 
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