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First, I apologize for the lengthy post. If you don't want the background details, skip to the last part. (Marked with ***)

So, I'm a complete newb who's going to buy a 1025R. I have a vague idea of what I want, but I could use some advice. So I'll start with some background information.

I'm 60, in relatively good health, and want to keep it that way. We bought a 2800sqft house in Allen TX on 1.2 acres. (On a street where all 30 lots are about an acre.) The property was never landscaped properly, nor updated inside. (Which is why we bought it, as well as the lot size/shape and location. Wife wanted a "clean slate".) So, we have a LOT of landscaping projects ahead of us. Wife wants a "park" of her own. (She's not very social.) I would like that as well, I just don't want to break my back achieving and maintaining it. Hence the tractor purchase. We already have a JD E120 Lawn Tractor that we bought 6 months ago to take keep the ugly Bermuda/weed lawns at bay until we can redo them. I'm self-employed and work from home, so I have time to work around the yard. My wife works part-time from home, and also has lots of time, but she's a bit delicate and can't spend more than a couple hours at it a day. I myself am a DIY'er, and my wife just wants to save money and have me do things. (She's more comfortable telling ME what to do than others.)

So here's the main things we need to do:
1. Clear all the stumps from the planter beds along the front and back of the house. (Mostly bushes and crape myrtles, which we've already cut back.) We've already done the back, by hand, ugh.
2. Remove the fence enclosing the small backyard, and put up a new fence that encloses the entire backyard. That's about 600 linear feet of fence, or roughly 75-100 posts. (We will also be pulling about 300 ft of old fence along the back and east side that are in rough shape.)
3. Plant about 40 trees. (Already planted 14 of them, by hand, ugh.) She likes to buy them big to be planted. Not the little guys at the big box stores. The last ones were 3ft root balls that were not light. Again, ugh. (All of the trees will have drip-irrigation systems, so trenching is required.)
4. Remove the diseased Hackberry trees along the back fence, and all the little privet sapplings and trees. (Leaving only a few select trees that she likes, and are not too close to the fence.) These have all been cleared already, by hand, ugh. But I still have a about 200 stumps to get rid of, ranging in size from my pinky to 12". (Anything bigger, like the hackberry stumps, will likely just get ground down below the surface and killed off. I then have to grade and smooth all that out. (We plant to have grass back there, as well as some decorative bushes along the fence.)
5. Remove all the existing Bermuda/Weeds from all lawns. (That's about 40,000 sqft) and prepare to replant with Turf-Type Tall Fescue. This will also involve removing all the old (crappy) lawn irrigation systems from the front and side yards, and replacing them better systems. So, lots of trenching.
6. Reduce the size of the lawns by creating undulating planter beds along all sides that sweep around the newly planted trees. These will be filled with bushes and/or ground cover, all of which will be allowed to grow to the natural size/shapes. Any exposed ground in those beds will be filled with cedar mulch. All of the planters will also be equipped with drip-irrigation systems, for which there will be trenching required.
7. Build a 30x30 detached garage/shop in the back corner to house all landscape equipment/tractors/attachments/implements, etc. (There will also be a covered carport on one side for a future RV.)

I'll stop there with the projects. Those are the main items. I'm hoping to get all of this accomplished over the next 3-5 years.

***
So, I was originally going to just buy the 1025R with loader and backhoe. I was considering the mower deck as well, but several people have recommended keeping my E120 for mowing duties. However, I recently learned that my wife doesn't want to mulch, and wants all grass clippings/leaves removed. I warned her that we will need the TKV20 if she expects me to keep the lawns free of clippings and leaves. She agreed. (Shocker) So now, I'm thinking I want the mower deck after all. I have the collection system on the E120 and it constantly clogs, so it's useless. Even with the lawn area reduced by 30%, I want mowing to be relatively painless, especially in the hot Texas summers.

I was originally going to rent whatever attachments I needed, but it looks like the 3-point hitch on the 1025R isn't going to work with what the rental yard carries. (More research is needed here.) I was already planning on getting pallet forks, and a narrow trenching bucket. Now I'm considering a box-blade and a tiller, as I'm going to have a lot of ground to regrade and a butt-load of tilling to do.

Given what we're planning to do, and that we don't want to go larger than the 1025R, I'd love to hear any and all advice you all have to offer. We're going to be heading to the local dealership in the first half of December to place an order. (Already qualified for 0%)

Thanks.
 

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Be prepared for sticker shock. Sounds like 40 grand in tractor and attachments. Get everything financed. You have a good list 馃憤馃徎
 

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Wow, that's a pretty long list! I have a 1025r FILB and about 9 acres of property. I love the tractor but especially when I'm digging out stumps I wish I had opted for something a little bit bigger, with a little bigger backhoe. See if your local dealer can drop off a couple of different tractors (a 1025r and perhaps a 3 series) so you have a feel for what you really need. If that's not an option I'd suggest a ripping tooth for the backhoe. I usually dig around the stumps then if I can't just rip them out, I use a reciprocating saw and cut them leaving enough for a chain to grab. Then use a portable winch to winch the stump out of the ground.
As JW said, get everything you think that you will need with your tractor purchase and use the 0% financing. It will make things a lot easier. A ripping tooth, trenching bucket, turf tires?, forks, R3 edge tamers, to name a few things that might make your work easier. I don't have any experience with land planes or any of those implements but I'm sure that there are half a dozen people here who can help you with those items. Good Luck and keep us posted.
 
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1025R
Backhoe
Loader
Toothbar
Ballast box
Pallet forks
Box Blade
Your call on the mower deck, but don't be afraid of the mulch kit for it. It works great.
BX Trencher bucket
BX ripper. Also works well for creating a trench for small lines like the irrigation. Less soil disturbance, but limited depth.
BX quick change for the backhoe. Makes changing the buckets/ripper quick and easy.


These are things I'd strongly consider for your said projects.
 
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You already set your limits but you will at some point want/need a bigger machine............that being said I would not purchase any size machine that includes a loader without getting the 3rd function hydraulics on the loader
 

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With respect, sounds like you have under an acre of land, after subtracting the footprint of the house and any driveway you likely have, and your garage and storage building. That is really not much land, and if you buy a big tractor, you will likely find it going to waste after it has done the initial jobs you list. The same with many implements. I speak from experience, as one who moved at age 65 from a 1/4 acre city lot to a 5 acre hobby farm.

i suggest you find a decent landscaping designer and contractor, who will bring in the correctly sized equipment and supplies for your initial projects. And perhaps even more important, will haul away all the bushes, stumps, fence posts and other debris.

At that point, with the big stuff out of the way, a 1025R would be ideal for the remaining smaller improvements and maintenance.

And instead of an implement storage building housing stuff you bought for basically one time use, the building could be a great workshop for you.
 

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Looks like you have a good start .
I would probably recommend a land plane over a box blade.
Also would recommend a heavy hitch over a ballast box.
I would recommend a taking some time to make a carful Comparison between the 1025R and 2025R.
Since I knew I too was planning on a TKV20. The added height of the 2025R is nice especially with implements setting as far back as the tail of the TKV20 sets. I just added a new 260B backhoe to my 2025R yesterday, and again was thankful for the added height of the 2025R . Drove it right up on my trailer never drug the backhoe at all. Even with the added height I do drag the TKV 20 just slightly when loading on the trailer.
 
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Invite TTWT out to do a few episodes at your place. Worth a try anyway.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Wow, that's a pretty long list! I have a 1025r FILB and about 9 acres of property. I love the tractor but especially when I'm digging out stumps I wish I had opted for something a little bit bigger, with a little bigger backhoe. See if your local dealer can drop off a couple of different tractors (a 1025r and perhaps a 3 series) so you have a feel for what you really need. If that's not an option I'd suggest a ripping tooth for the backhoe. I usually dig around the stumps then if I can't just rip them out, I use a reciprocating saw and cut them leaving enough for a chain to grab. Then use a portable winch to winch the stump out of the ground.
As JW said, get everything you think that you will need with your tractor purchase and use the 0% financing. It will make things a lot easier. A ripping tooth, trenching bucket, turf tires?, forks, R3 edge tamers, to name a few things that might make your work easier. I don't have any experience with land planes or any of those implements but I'm sure that there are half a dozen people here who can help you with those items. Good Luck and keep us posted.
My thoughts exactly. I figured I'd buy everything I need, then sell of the more specialized attachments later after all the big projects are done.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Looks like you have a good start .
I would probably recommend a land plane over a box blade.
Also would recommend a heavy hitch over a ballast box.
I would recommend a taking some time to make a carful Comparison between the 1025R and 2025R.
Since I knew I too was planning on a TKV20. The added height of the 2025R is nice especially with implements setting as far back as the tail of the TKV20 sets. I just added a new 260B backhoe to my 2025R yesterday, and again was thankful for the added height of the 2025R . Drove it right up on my trailer never drug the backhoe at all. Even with the added height I do drag the TKV 20 just slightly when loading on the trailer.
I fear that going bigger than a 1025R would be a mistake, given that, after subtracting the footprint of the house and hardscapes, I have only about 2/3 of an acre to maintain. The 1025R might take longer to get the same jobs done, but it will get them done, and it won't be too large to be used as mostly a mower once the landscaping is done. A 2-series would be a bit large.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
With respect, sounds like you have under an acre of land, after subtracting the footprint of the house and any driveway you likely have, and your garage and storage building. That is really not much land, and if you buy a big tractor, you will likely find it going to waste after it has done the initial jobs you list. The same with many implements. I speak from experience, as one who moved at age 65 from a 1/4 acre city lot to a 5 acre hobby farm.

i suggest you find a decent landscaping designer and contractor, who will bring in the correctly sized equipment and supplies for your initial projects. And perhaps even more important, will haul away all the bushes, stumps, fence posts and other debris.

At that point, with the big stuff out of the way, a 1025R would be ideal for the remaining smaller improvements and maintenance.

And instead of an implement storage building housing stuff you bought for basically one time use, the building could be a great workshop for you.
I agree about not getting a big tractor, which is why I was looking at the 1025R. Once all the main landscaping projects are done, it will still be of use for maintenance of that landscape, such as mowing and occasionally lifting something in and out of the truck.

The problem with contractors around here is that they are in such high demand that they can charge whatever they want, which is usually prohibitively expensive. This is why we're doing everything ourselves. If we hired contractors, we'd only be able to do about half the stuff we want to do. (Although there are some things we will have to hire contractors for, like roofing, some plumbing and electrical.) The other problem is that my wife is extremely particular about how things are done. We have yet to use a contractor that meets her performance standards.
 

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Rykymus,
I'm about 90% through one of my landscaping projects with only the back 3/4 acre remaining. That projects completed using an 1023E included moving 100 tons of loam. 60 tons of gravel, 4 tons of paving stones, the complete seeding, fertilizing and growth of 1/2 acre of new lawn, removal of a 60' x 20' ridge along with the trees and rock to go with it. I also totally re-built and landscaped my neighbors side yard and that resulted in a new lawn, block patio, horse shoe pits and fire pit.

And I moved my 16' x 10' shed, installed 70' of picket fence, 100' of 6' privacy fence, 120' of retaining wall using 2x12x16 PT and 4" posts which also included a shelf for my attachments`.

I did all of this using my 1023e and the following;


1023e (4K less than 1025R)
JD 120R Loader and bucket
Heavy Hitch Toothbar
JD Ballast box
Aerator
Frontier Box Blade
Countyline Post hole digger (SOLD)
5' Rake
Pine needle rake
54" MMM w/ JD
Chains
1 very comfortable 2" suspension cushion Grammer seat
Stump bucket
Grapple
JD 3rd SCV - highly recommended

It seems to be SOP on this site for everyone to suggest bigger tractors and attachments you'll only use once. The biggest problem with that is it's not their budget, not their money, and not their tractor.

You don't need a larger tractor, and you don't need "special" attachments to do a wonderful job of landscaping. All you need is what I've listed above to begin with. You may need something else in the future, but I would advise NOT spending that money unless you have to. 1 acre is a piece of cake for any 1 series tractor regardless of what you need done.
It seems to be SOP on this site for everyone to suggest bigger tractors and attachments you'll only use once. The biggest problem with that is it's not their budget, not their money, and not their tractor.

You don't need a larger tractor, and you don't need "special" attachments to do a wonderful job of landscaping. All you need is what I've listed above to begin with. You may need something else in the future, but I would advise NOT spending that money unless you have to. 1 acre is a piece of cake for any 1 series tractor regardless of what you need done.

Neighbors yard

762984


My front yard 2 weeks after seed

762986

762987
762988
 
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It seems to be SOP on this site for everyone to suggest bigger tractors
I could be wrong ....but i kinda figured if a lot of these 1025 owners recommended a larger tractor they might know what they are talking about
 

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I could be wrong ....but i kinda figured if a lot of these 1025 owners recommended a larger tractor they might know what they are talking about
I didn't see anything in his list of things to get done that required a larger tractor. Maybe some of the larger stumps, but then moving one size up in tractors just for digging stumps does not seem like a good idea to me. I doubt that the next size up is all that different in capabilities. If you need something for the big stumps, just rent an excavator.
 

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I could be wrong ....but i kinda figured if a lot of these 1025 owners recommended a larger tractor they might know what they are talking about
Correct. In this case you could be wrong, and so could I. But you do know that the 1023 I own has the same capabilities as the 1025. I know it's not a 5 series machine, but I also know it will do what the OP needs done without any problems at all.
 
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I agree about not getting a big tractor, which is why I was looking at the 1025R. Once all the main landscaping projects are done, it will still be of use for maintenance of that landscape, such as mowing and occasionally lifting something in and out of the truck.

The problem with contractors around here is that they are in such high demand that they can charge whatever they want, which is usually prohibitively expensive. This is why we're doing everything ourselves. If we hired contractors, we'd only be able to do about half the stuff we want to do. (Although there are some things we will have to hire contractors for, like roofing, some plumbing and electrical.) The other problem is that my wife is extremely particular about how things are done. We have yet to use a contractor that meets her performance standards.
I am spoiled by having a great landscape designer. He subs out to folks he trusts, mostly the same crews, and is always on site to supervise, plus he doesn鈥檛 mind my wife overseeing everything. And he will do small things like picking up and delivering fertilizer, lime, grass seed, fence boards, gravel and such for a small fee. And it鈥檚 less than half of what HD or Lowe鈥檚 would charge for delivery. And he doesn鈥檛 mind me doing the spreading, sowing, and fence repairs myself. That has enabled me to stay away from Covid by not having to enter a store. Since last February I have been off the farm only 6 times, all early on Sunday mornings to refill my diesel fuel containers before the lottery ticket buyers are out of bed.
 

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I didn't see anything in his list of things to get done that required a larger tractor. Maybe some of the larger stumps, but then moving one size up in tractors just for digging stumps does not seem like a good idea to me. I doubt that the next size up is all that different in capabilities. If you need something for the big stumps, just rent an excavator.
next size up ground clearance and loader capabilities are significantly higher for not much more $......but he might not need either of those........to me i would want the higher loader capacity over even buying a backhoe attachement as you said he could probably rent a mini-ex and be $ ahead for stump digging.....#1 implement i use on tractors is the loader
 

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ttazzman,
You own a D4, 5105, 4500, and 2140. How big is your farm. I ask because my sister (RIP) owned a farm in NH that I worked every summer. She owned a pair of Ford 4000, an IH and some wierd dozer. That was more than 55 years ago and for the size of her farm, 88 acres, I thought she had more equipment than needed, especially since her husband at the time was a bum and the only people driving were her and I.

Absolutely correct on the "next size up" loader/tractor. The 220R has a lift capacity of almost 500lbs more.

Key Specs
Maximum lift height (A)2160 mm
85 in.
Lift capacity at full heightMeasured at pivot (U)
509 kg
1120 lb
Measured at 500 mm ahead of pivot (V)
365 kg
803 lb
Boom breakout forceMeasured at pivot (Y)
886 kgf
1949 lbf
Measured at 500 mm ahead of pivot (Z)
618 kgf
1360 lbf
Bucket rollback force capacityAt ground-level line (ZZ)
972 kgf
2138 lbf
Clearance at full height - bucket dumped (C)1667 mm
66 in.
Dump angle, degrees (E)36 degree (angle)
Rollback angle, degrees (G)34 degree (angle)
 

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Rykymus,
I'm about 90% through one of my landscaping projects with only the back 3/4 acre remaining. That projects completed using an 1023E included moving 100 tons of loam. 60 tons of gravel, 4 tons of paving stones, the complete seeding, fertilizing and growth of 1/2 acre of new lawn, removal of a 60' x 20' ridge along with the trees and rock to go with it. I also totally re-built and landscaped my neighbors side yard and that resulted in a new lawn, block patio, horse shoe pits and fire pit.

And I moved my 16' x 10' shed, installed 70' of picket fence, 100' of 6' privacy fence, 120' of retaining wall using 2x12x16 PT and 4" posts which also included a shelf for my attachments`.

I did all of this using my 1023e and the following;


1023e (4K less than 1025R)
JD 120R Loader and bucket
Heavy Hitch Toothbar
JD Ballast box
Aerator
Frontier Box Blade
Countyline Post hole digger (SOLD)
5' Rake
Pine needle rake
54" MMM w/ JD
Chains
1 very comfortable 2" suspension cushion Grammer seat
Stump bucket
Grapple
JD 3rd SCV - highly recommended

It seems to be SOP on this site for everyone to suggest bigger tractors and attachments you'll only use once. The biggest problem with that is it's not their budget, not their money, and not their tractor.

You don't need a larger tractor, and you don't need "special" attachments to do a wonderful job of landscaping. All you need is what I've listed above to begin with. You may need something else in the future, but I would advise NOT spending that money unless you have to. 1 acre is a piece of cake for any 1 series tractor regardless of what you need done.
It seems to be SOP on this site for everyone to suggest bigger tractors and attachments you'll only use once. The biggest problem with that is it's not their budget, not their money, and not their tractor.

You don't need a larger tractor, and you don't need "special" attachments to do a wonderful job of landscaping. All you need is what I've listed above to begin with. You may need something else in the future, but I would advise NOT spending that money unless you have to. 1 acre is a piece of cake for any 1 series tractor regardless of what you need done.

Neighbors yard



My front yard 2 weeks after seed
Pretty much every man (and a lot of women folk) the Lord has created since Adam and Eve wants a much larger tractor!

Unfortunately money and other needs often get in the way so reality has to take precedence. At least for some folks like me.

It's in forums like this that I like some "detailed anecdotal evidence" to help us with making a decision.

For us, we've just about settled on a 1 series TLB in spring. It's not a 590 Case or a 325 Cat but we're not building developments or highways, we're maintaining an acre or so of grass, rocks and trees. Making back breaking work pleasurable.

At least for us a big concern in any equipment purchase is hauling it around. Given the cost of new trucks and of fuel, I doubt I'll be getting another 3/4 or 1 ton plow truck anymore so that means to rent larger equipment would entail renting/borrowing a bigger truck and trailer or having the equipment delivered. Inconvenient.

The one (or two) series are really affordable for all of the utility they offer. Certainly bigger machines do more work and easier but for a number of us we're limited by budgets and storage space.

If not I'd be getting a 5 or 6 series utility tractor and a Case 590 and pullling it around with my new KW/Pete/Mack lowboy. :D
 
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