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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I picked up a downed tree for a friend of my wife. It had been down for maybe 8 months. It was bucked and after splitting it measured between 20-25% moisture. It is not as dense(heavy) as red oak at the same moisture content but heavier than pine. Much harder to split with a maul that oak. I'm in CT. No leaves were left and I didn't really look at surrounding trees. Can anyone ID it from the pictures? I'm thinking of using it for fire pit wood. Thanks.

Edit, just for the record I can't identify many trees, maybe Red Oak, that's it! LOL
Brown Wood Bedrock Trunk Formation
Blue Wood Trunk Plant Natural landscape
Pollinator Insect Wood Bedrock Butterfly
 

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wag..fir or Hemlock....idk if that even grows over there......I'm more familiar with Oregon trees.......and still stumped by many of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Green wood? Locust?

It’s hard on chains, and even with straight grain it’s miserable to split.

There isn’t much that makes better firewood though.
The first picture shows the wood color the best. The green cast on the wood chips is from my flashlight.
 

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The first picture shows the wood color the best. The green cast on the wood chips is from my flashlight.
Did it split easily?

The actual green of locust goes away shortly after splitting if it has seasoned a little. When fully seasoned the green color is just brown.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Did it split easily?

The actual green of locust goes away shortly after splitting if it has seasoned a little. When fully seasoned the green color is just brown.
It wasn't split until today. It had been on the ground since maybe April. Moisture after splitting 20-25%. This is closer to a red than brown I think?
 

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It wasn't split until today. It had been on the ground since maybe April. Moisture after splitting 20-25%. This is closer to a red than brown I think?
I wouldn’t consider that seasoned especially for locust. The stuff I got was stacked log length from June to December, it was still tough as nails with distinctive green when fighting the splitter.
 

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I wouldn’t consider that seasoned especially for locust. The stuff I got was stacked log length from June to December, it was still tough as nails with distinctive green when fighting the splitter.
I'm horrible for identifying trees but that wood looks a lot like my locust and I have lots of it... though the first bark looks like cherry and we gots that too!

You need to jump in one of those log splitter discussions... I have a ton of locust to split and I'm jonesing for a log splitter since my friend who used to split with me is moving.
 

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The split wood appears something like locust but even within locust there are several varieties. Log id is really, really hard to do except for a few distinctive species. The experts take thin chips of wood and examine the cell structure.

If it is locust, it's good firewood. We have mostly honey locust which has a couple of characteristics you can use. It burns very hot and log- one of my favorite woods. It's heavy and tends to grow on field edges. If you cut it in low light, you'll probably see sparks coming off the bark. Straight grain chunks should split easily, particularly if you split large pieces around the annular rings but even straight across should split. When cut green, the bark comes off fairly easily. The heartwood doesn't rot easily- we used it for fence posts for years. You can drive a staple into green wood but heaven help you trying to drive one into an old seasoned post.

Oh, and those sparks? When you throw it in a stove or on a fire you will see a mini fireworks display for a minute or two if it's honey locust.
 

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Bark on the Cherry out here looks a lot like Birch...smooth.......Locust I don't think we have.
If we do its scarce.
 

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Looks evergreen. I’d say fir because you said it’s a red color but that bark is pretty dark. Don’t know much about locust but it’s definitely an evergreen (coniferous). Typically fir is pretty easy to split and doesn’t have many knots. Hemlock have straight trunks but get funky towards the branches. I’d love to see it in log form.
 
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My guess is locust,, it is hard to cut and split. , when it is dry you can see sparks coming off your chain as you cut the wood.
 

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Well when this gets sorted out.....

I have some crazy Huge ceder.......What Kind...IDK but I'd like too.yep got pics and a leaf sample in the freezer.

I'll sit back till the locust apocalipse is resolved..or Hemlock..or .....
 

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Well when this gets sorted out.....

I have some crazy Huge ceder.......What Kind...IDK but I'd like too.yep got pics and a leaf sample in the freezer.

I'll sit back till the locust apocalipse is resolved..or Hemlock..or .....
A customer has some 30’ hemlock, they have knots from top to bottom and stringy bark, with a similar but smaller pattern.
 

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Hemlock in OR can be 120'+ tall. 3' at the stump.

Hard to distinguish from Fir especially in the Coastal area to my close west...Braches are 80' up. Stalks are strait.
I'm sure there are many varietys.
 

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Fir has a more symmetrical shape than a hemlock that looks like it has a bad haircut Duke. The west coast giants were talking about here. I don’t know much about any eastern short hemlocks
 
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