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Hi all,

I am in Michigan, and am considering installing a 'block heater' in my 1025R.

Seems like I read some posts a few years ago about people having problems with the JD Block Heater 'burning out' quickly and not working.

Can I get some feedback from people that installed the block heater.... and what your experience has been? Do you like it, regret it.... ?

Are there any downsides or issues from installing the block heater? Any problems with 'leakage' etc?

I am thinking about having the dealer do it, so that if something gets screwed up, it is on them.

As it stands now, my 1025 sputters and chugs for about 10 seconds and blasts smoke out on a 60 degree day.... winter is exponentially worse.


Thanks.
 

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No drawbacks that I can see. You lose your coolant in the process of installing it, but it can be recycled, I just replaced mine. It dramatically improves cold weather starting, no smoke or sputtering. I recommend it.

I'd have the dealer do it to avoid the mess. I do too much work myself, if it doesn't break the bank, have them do it.
 

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I have a 2012 1026r and had one installed when I bought it. Haven’t had any issues and it makes big difference in starting. I live in northern wi. I generally plug it in for1/2 not to hour before starting. By the time I move the snow from doorways etc it’s usually ready. When gets real cold (20below). I give it extra time


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I have a 2011 1026r. Live in vt so I use it often during winter even with tractor being parked in the garage. It makes a huge difference when starting.
Mine went bad towards the end of last season so installed a new one this summer. Easy to replace too but like others said coolant needs to be replaced or captured and re-used. Mine was due for a cooloant change anyways so it worked out well.
 

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Installing a block heater was kind of hard in my 1023E due to the location of the frost plug...very hard to get a punch/screwdriver on the frost plug to drive it out. It would be a chip shot on a 1025R due to the more conventional location. You'll lose about a gallon of coolant, so pick some up before you start. I'd also recommend some high-temp gasket sealer to smear (judiciously) on the gasket. Also, very unlikely you'll need the long cord, so get the short one.

Also, note that this ZeroStart block heater is the same one that Deere sells as OEM (John Deere Engine Coolant Heater Kit - AR87167) for twice the price. You'll still need the adapter for your 1025R John Deere Engine Block Heater Adapter Kit - AM134805 . No cheap way out of that one.

Here is a nice step-by-step Engine Block Heater Install - 1025R
 

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What typically burns out the heater element is starting the engine too soon after unplugging it, or starting the engine while it's still plugged in.
In air, the element gets scorching hot in a matter of only a couple seconds. It relies on being submerged in the coolant to keep it from burning out. What happens when you start the engine too soon, is the water pump starts circulating the coolant. The coolant that isn't close to the heater is relatively colder than the coolant next to the heater. That "colder" coolant suddenly hitting the extremely hot element causes the burnout failure. It may be instant, or burn out after a few times of doing this. To avoid this, unplug the heater and let it sit about 5 minutes before starting the engine. That gives the heater time to cool down so the inrush of colder coolant doesn't hurt it.
 

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I'm in northern WI and use the dealer installed block heater anytime the temp in the attached garage gets below about 35º. It makes starting so much easier and there's a lot less smoke. I plug it in a ½ hour before going out, and unplug it before starting, then cycle the glow plug 3 or 4 times and my 1025r starts like it's a warm summer day. It would be a smoky, cold blooded machine without one!!!
 

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People who have trouble let the heater run too long or as Kyle said, start the engine with the heater plugged in or soon after unplugging it, Avoid doing those and you will likely have years of trouble free operation. I have had the same block heater in the Yanmar in my 455 for over 20 years.

One important point, is the block heaters draw mice and their nests like a Motel 6 draws meth makers and their "shake and bake labs". If you keep the tractor where its not heated, if there is a way for mice to get next to the engine block, they will do it. I have seen them build nests the size of a baseball in a 12 hour period and pack it on top of the engine, usually right at the manifolds where the heat is. This means the grass and other material can catch fire from your muffler and exhaust pipes, or at a minimum, smolder and possibly damage wiring or harm paint, etc.

Once I started the tractor in the barn and a mouse comes scrambling out from under the hood with a mouse half way in the "delivery process". I grabbed the nest ir came from and threw it in the snow and there were several siblings in there. I bet that mom mouse was really unhappy with me. Thing was, I had used the tractor 12 hours before and there was no nest there then.

These block heaters are not hard to put in and not complicated to use if one uses common sense. Run it for a half hour or so before starting the tractor, no need to keep it plugged in all of the time. If you do leave it plugged in, the electric company will thank you.............and so will the mice.

You can also get magnetic heating pads for warming the hydro oil. I have used the tractor in very cold weather and it takes some time to build heat in the hydro fluid. In the meantime, the pedals push much stiffer and the FEL control levers can be much harder to move. Just letting the machine warm up usually helps build hydro heat.

The best way to keep the engine warm and to keep the heat in the hydro oil is to block the air from being pulled through the radiator and across the oil cooler in front of the radiator. Simply installing cardboard, I use the packaging from a case of Mountain Dew and it fits very well in the radiator screen area. By blocking the air from crossing the radiator, you are keeping the coolant warmer, which keeps the engine temp more consistent. Just keep an eye on the temp gauge and as long as the engine temps are in the normal range, you are fine.

Diesel engines like heat more than very cold temps so blocking the air flow is a common thing on the diesels. The main point is to prevent the cold air from the outside of the hood from being pulled across the radiator. It works. There are threads on this topic as well.............Just make sure in the spring as the temps warm to remove the cardboard to permit normal fresh air flow.
 

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One important point, is the block heaters draw mice and their nests like a Motel 6 draws meth makers and their "shake and bake labs". If you keep the tractor where its not heated, if there is a way for mice to get next to the engine block, they will do it.
I have a repeating mouse trap in the equipment shed,,
tomorrow, I will add some sort of light bulb to that trap,, to see if the heat will attract even MORE mice!!

Maybe you should have patented the idea of a heated mouse trap!!?? :dunno:


:bigthumb:
 

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Installing a block heater was kind of hard in my 1023E due to the location of the frost plug...very hard to get a punch/screwdriver on the frost plug to drive it out. It would be a chip shot on a 1025R due to the more conventional location. You'll lose about a gallon of coolant, so pick some up before you start. I'd also recommend some high-temp gasket sealer to smear (judiciously) on the gasket. Also, very unlikely you'll need the long cord, so get the short one.

Also, note that this ZeroStart block heater is the same one that Deere sells as OEM (John Deere Engine Coolant Heater Kit - AR87167) for twice the price. You'll still need the adapter for your 1025R John Deere Engine Block Heater Adapter Kit - AM134805 . No cheap way out of that one.

Here is a nice step-by-step Engine Block Heater Install - 1025R
Does the 1026r require that threaded adapter? $122... Damn...
 

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I just pulled up the instructions - looks like both the 1026r and 1025r require AM134805 in order to install the engine block heater.



And by the way, be aware that buying this heater poses a substantial risk if you live in California...:eek:hmy:

 

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And by the way, be aware that buying this heater poses a substantial risk if you live in California...:eek:hmy:

Are you saying that if I move to California, and take this tractor that I installed a block heater on last fall that I will inevitably get cancer.


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i love my block heater, 4 years and no problems. The key, like others pointed out, always unplug it for a minute or two before starting to allow the element to cool.

someone said 5 minutes, I'm not sure it takes that long? I wait about one minute and it still works... i always figured that would give plenty of time for a glowing hot element to cool to the temp of the coolant around it.

But, I'd always consider changing my procedure based on new information!
 

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I'm
not saying that...California is saying that....
Oh, that makes me feel better, I really don’t give a $&¥% what they say


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