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Discussion Starter #1
With all this extra time on my hands since retiring, I thought I'd like to spend some of that time making our own loaf bread here at home.
I don't have any problem making it the regular way, and baking in the oven, but I thought I'd like to try some of the new-fangled bread makers they sell on the open market.
Most importantly, I'd appreciate some feedback on any bread makers ya'll may use, or have used, and found to be worth the expense, and which brands do I need to shy away from, for whatever reason.
More or less, looking for something reliable and user friendly.
Thanks folks !!! :bigthumb:
 

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Ms. Superglidesport is an amatuer baker. She specializes in pumpkin bread, banana walnut bread, olive bread and spiced squash bread. She also makes a killer pumpkin roll that's loaded with her special cream cheese, frosting filling. She's working on perfecting her version of Portuguese sweet bread too. No bread maker but she has a huge collection of bread and cake pans.

:thumbup1gif:
 

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GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
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I do not use a bread maker or machine, but I do make homemade bread. Willing to share ideas for that, if needed.
 

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An older unit and Babycakes has made a lot of bread with it. I would imagine the newer units are even better.
We call it "R2 D2"

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The bread loaves do come out a little smaller.
 

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I should have mentioned in my earlier post that Mrs. Superglidesport bakes a great beer batter bread that makes a good sandwich even better. It's fantastic just toasted with butter or jelly. It also occurred to me that when she bakes she usually makes multiple loaves for us, our friends and her commuter train buddies so both ovens are usually being used. I guess a benefit of the bread maker would be for making single loaves.

EDIT. I just checked with Mrs. Superglidesport and she educated me on the benefits of the bread maker. Apparently it does all the work for you! Mixes the ingredients, proofs it and then bakes the bread.
 

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I should have mentioned in my earlier post that Mrs. Superglidesport bakes a great beer batter bread that makes a good sandwich even better. It's fantastic just toasted with butter or jelly. It also occurred to me that when she bakes she usually makes multiple loaves for us, our friends and her commuter train buddies so both ovens are usually being used. I guess a benefit of the bread maker would be for making single loaves.

EDIT. I just checked with Mrs. Superglidesport and she educated me on the benefits of the bread maker. Apparently it does all the work for you! Mixes the ingredients, proofs it and then bakes the bread.
Sometimes I sort of consider that a problem. If it's been a while since we made bread the first loaf is gone really fast.
 

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Wife does all the baking ,and makes all the old fashion way in the oven. Our oldest daughter has a older bread maker , just not sure what brand.

For a laugh-- My grandmother died in 63 , (according to dad ) made the best home made biscuits.. Dad ask grandma to show my mom how see made them and to give her the recipe..
Grandma showed mom one weekend, so one day that week mom surprised dad with HOME MADE BISCUITS..

Only problem ,,,they were so HARD , not from being over baked . My brother and I took them outside and we used them as a baseball...No kidding.:nunu:
Took hitting them 3-5 times before breaking to pieces. Mom was upset but a good sport and even took a couple of hits , we all laughed.
Mom talked with grandma found out what she did wrong...

After the first failure ,,, the rest would melt in your mouth. :eating:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
An older unit and Babycakes has made a lot of bread with it. I would imagine the newer units are even better.
We call it "ET"

View attachment 40674

The bread loaves do come out a little smaller.
Smaller is ok, just the two of us.
 

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Ms. Superglidesport is an amatuer baker. She specializes in pumpkin bread, banana walnut bread, olive bread and spiced squash bread. She also makes a killer pumpkin roll that's loaded with her special cream cheese, frosting filling. She's working on perfecting her version of Portuguese sweet bread too. No bread maker but she has a huge collection of bread and cake pans.
Same here - Mrs. Coaltrain's breads were always a hit at the farmers market. Pumpkin, Zucchini, Banana, and many others. She used to make 40-50 loaves a week.

For plain white bread however we just use the frozen pre-made stuff stuff - just have to thaw, get it to rise, and bake - oh yum! I mentioned a bread maker to her once years ago and she just scoffed at the idea.
 

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My Banana Bread, (both with and without nuts) and my Zucchini Bread have sort of made me famous. They have even been enjoyed as far as 1000 miles away! :bigthumb:
 

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An older unit and Babycakes has made a lot of bread with it. I would imagine the newer units are even better.
We call it "ET"

View attachment 40674

The bread loaves do come out a little smaller.
"ET" or "R2"????

Farmgirl - can you tell us a simple recipe for regular old bread??? We don't have a breadmaker, but we do have two 5 gallon pails of spent brewing grains that I'd love to make into some loaves!!!

-J.
 

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If you want to make sourdough bread, and can let the dough have time to get yeasty on its own, Use equal parts water, and flour (I use organic, unbleached) and place in a large jar, bowl or bucket. Drape a towel over the top, just so you do not have flies or gnats get into it, and set it aside. A cool place is best, as you do not have to feed the yeast as much food. Every 2-3 days, remove towel, add a little extra flour (amount depends on what size container you are using), stir and cover again. You do NOT want an airtight seal. When you get the bubbling mixture that smells sour, you can use half to make a loaf of bread. And add more flour and water to the original starter and let the process begin again. Subsequent batches take less time to be ready to use for baking. Bread made this way is unique, as each home has its own "flavor" of yeast, and that is what gets into the dough. Can't get more basic than that, but not everyone wants to mess with it like that. If stored at room temp, feed the dough mix some fresh flour every couple of days. If stored in the fridge, you can decrease he addition of flour to once a week. But the key is to add it, so you feed the yeast that will form in the dough. No, for this, you do not need to add yeast, but you do need patience.

If you want to make more loaves (7-8, 1lb loaves) Add 6 cups of water, 2TBS table salt, 2TBS yeast and 13 cups of flour. Place in a 12 quart container that has a lid. If you want to bake it today, use warm (100*) water. That will allow the dough to double in size in about 2 hours, and be ready to add herbs to, or just bake it as it is. If you use only half of it, store the remaining in the refrigerator, for use on another day. Once I get a batch started well, I usually bake once a week. The dough will keep in the fridge for up to 2 weeks, so you get 3 weeks worth of baking from it. If you need longer storage, you can freeze this dough in an airtight container, and defrost overnight in the fridge before using.

The key with these breads is to not overwork the dough. Pull up a ball (4 inch size) from the starter, and dust it with just enough flour that it doesn't stick to your hands, and work the dough lightly, no more than 30 seconds. Set the dough ball on a bread stone, and let it rest for 45 minutes. (It may not rise much while resting, but will when you bake it.) Preheat oven to 450* and once bread has rested 45 minutes, bake in the oven for 30-35 minutes. (This may take a little trial and error, as it depends on the size of your bread loaf and your oven. You want an internal bread temp of 210*F (99*C).) Let cool thoroughly before slicing.

I think a bread book that is well worth the money is "The New Artisan Bread In Five Minutes A Day" List price is $29.99, but I think I found mine cheaper on Amazon or ebay. It even includes gluten free recipes. It has basic recipes, and also ways to make herbed breads using the basic recipes, as well as fresh pastries, pocket bread, and even Americanized soft white bread. 351 pages, with good photos and descriptions.

I'm not a fan of plain old sandwich bread, but the book has a recipe for that too!!
 

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Thank you!!!!

What proportion of my spent grains would you suggest??

-J.
 

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Thank you!!!!

What proportion of my spent grains would you suggest??

-J.
Honestly, I'd just dry them and then grind them into flour and use at the recommended measures. I never got that far into the bread making, but probably because I never was the one doing the brewing. Had a friend in college that did the brewing, and I never saw the grains after the process. (Although there were sometimes "floaters" in the beer.) :laugh:
 

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Thank you!!!!

What proportion of my spent grains would you suggest??

-J.
 
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