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I've seen this come up but couldn't find any definitive answers. I know grease is to be stored within certain temperature parameters to prevent it from separating... but what about oil?

Are there any ill effects from storing oil (full synthetic and dino juice) in an unheated garage that gets 100 degrees in the summer and single digits in the winter?

I'm thinking more along the lines of when you have a case of oil that will take several seasons to use so it's likely to go through multiple high/low extreme temperature cycles.
 

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I keep mine in a pole barn that sees temps from -Teens to 100+ and I haven’t noticed any issues. An engine operates at well over 200 degrees so being hot in a barn isn’t even close to an engine temp. If it’s in a sealed container there shouldn’t be any moisture Introduced from temp swings. I keep my grease in there too. My tractor is in there too so any effects on the fluids in storage would also happen to the fluids in the tractor.
 

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Millions of cars sit outside all year round. Lots of oil in oil pans experience what you're talking about. Oil that's been broken down and well used to, so its protection properties are compromised.
 

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I keep mine in a pole barn that sees temps from -Teens to 100+ and I haven’t noticed any issues. An engine operates at well over 200 degrees so being hot in a barn isn’t even close to an engine temp. If it’s in a sealed container there shouldn’t be any moisture Introduced from temp swings. I keep my grease in there too. My tractor is in there too so any effects on the fluids in storage would also happen to the fluids in the tractor.
I guess my primary question revolved around moisture accumulation more so than degradation due to the heat. While most are in sealed containers, there are always several partial containers of various blends.
 
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Millions of cars sit outside all year round. Lots of oil in oil pans experience what you're talking about. Oil that's been broken down and well used to, so its protection properties are compromised.
I should have stated that moisture was the main concern. True, cars do sit outside but then they are typically ran and the oil is heated to operating temperature. If a car sat outside for 2-3 years without starting the engine would the oil pan accumulate moisture?
 
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I should have stated that moisture was the main concern. True, cars do sit outside but then they are typically ran and the oil is heated to operating temperature. If a car sat outside for 2-3 years without starting the engine would the oil pan accumulate moisture?
A cars oil is vented to the atmosphere so it could accumulate moisture. Oil in a capped container should be fine in storage.
 

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Condensation builds up and burns off repeatedly.
I agree a sealed container should be just fine.
 

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...cars do sit outside but then they are typically ran and the oil is heated to operating temperature....
I'm glad you make the distinction that the oil needs to get up to temp, not just what the coolant gauge is showing. That's something many car enthusiasts who store their cars over the winter get wrong all the time. I used to think that it was a good idea to run the engine at least once a month just to circulate the oil - so I would fire up whatever car had in storage and let it idle for 10-15 minutes. I later found out that, unless you are actually getting the engine oil up to operating temperature (irregardless of the coolant temp), you are probably doing more harm than good with those cold starts because you are never burning off moisture in the oil pan. If you are ever in a vehicle that can show coolant and oil temperatures, you will be shocked at how much longer it takes oil to get up to temp vs. coolant when it's cold outside. As an example, in sub freezing weather my daily driver's oil temp would start to register on the gauge (125 degrees) when I was pulling into the parking lot at work - about a 20 minute drive whereas the coolant was showing hot after about 5 minutes.

Like others have said, if you are talking about storing oil in sealed/never opened containers, I think you will be OK.
 

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Just taste it before using it to make sure it is good....

More seriously, if you are talking a small quart, even if a partial there isn't enough moisture in the air to be too big of a deal. If you are talking you buy oil in bulk of 55 gallon drums and it takes you 20 years to get through it then that is kind of pushing things a bit.
 

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I have wondered the same thing about condensation on metal parts. Like inside the transmission or oil pan or even fuel tank. I try to keep the fuel as full as possible on any of my machines. Only run non ethanol fuel in the Snowmobiles and walk behind blower. Fill the lawn mowers up too. Can’t help the oil and hydro levels. One good way on the small stuff is to feel the oil filter for temp or shoot it with a temp gun.
 

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Ive been storing every automotive chemical known to mankind in my unheated, uncooled garage for 35 years. The only thing I have ever had an issue with is full bottles of car wash that have cracked and leaked all over once they thawed out. (that hasnt happened in years since I move that stuff into the basement in the late fall)

You wont have any problems with what you are talking about.
 

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According to Chevron "A temperature range of –20°C to 45°C is acceptable for storing most lubricating oils and greases. Ideally, the storage temperature range should be from 0°C to 25°C. "

–20°C = -4F
0°C = 32F
25°C = 77F
45°C = 113F


So essentially, keep them above freezing and you're good.


I'm glad you make the distinction that the oil needs to get up to temp, not just what the coolant gauge is showing. That's something many car enthusiasts who store their cars over the winter get wrong all the time. I used to think that it was a good idea to run the engine at least once a month just to circulate the oil - so I would fire up whatever car had in storage and let it idle for 10-15 minutes. I later found out that, unless you are actually getting the engine oil up to operating temperature (irregardless of the coolant temp), you are probably doing more harm than good with those cold starts because you are never burning off moisture in the oil pan.
This reminded me of years back when I lived up in northern Maine. There wasn't much driving to do in the town we lived in. Everything was within a 3 or 4 mile circle. So a lot of people only drove short distances most of the time. Just like in your oil, water tends to condense in your cooling muffler during winter months. And after starting/stopping their cars for numerous very short trips people would build up a LOT of water in their mufflers. Eventually they'd go on a decent trip and you'd see water pouring out their tailpipe as they drove down the road.
 

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Unless there is a large ammount of water in the oil from rain water getting in or some such, when you dump it into your engine, any condensation should burn off under normal use. Hydraulic oil is more sensitive to moisture because of the closed system. Where i work, we have stored excess fluid bulk in shipping containers for years and havent had any condensation issues
 

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If your car has a true oil pressure gauge and not the "idiot gauges" found in Ford's you can use that as well to determine if the engine oil has reach operating temp. When cold the oil pressure at idle will be much higher than when the oil reaches operating temp. (Probably why many makers stopped putting a real pressure gauge)
 
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