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for back blades that are serrated for etching heavy ice build up? Last Jan we were supposed to get five inches of snow but instead we got a couple inches of rain and it went into the polar vortex the next day. A friend of mine who has a very long and I mean very long driveway is considering cutting teeth in his back blade. I feel that would be a mistake and was wondering if there is other options either a single purpose replacement or making one. Can't seem to find one on the net when googled.
 

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If your ice is rock hard like mine usually gets forget it. There is no down pressure on a back blade - even with a serrated cutting edge it is just going to slide along on top.

I’ve tried using my tooth bar on my loader to score up the ice. Even with the down pressure and the teeth pointing straight down it never made a mark on the ice.

Tell him not to waste his money.

The only thing that is going to help is to spread some anti-skid on it.

54F0C198-C006-4ECD-85F0-C6C5B6920087.jpeg
 

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If your ice is rock hard like mine usually gets forget it. There is no down pressure on a back blade - even with a serrated cutting edge it is just going to slide along on top.

I’ve tried using my tooth bar on my loader to score up the ice. Even with the down pressure and the teeth pointing straight down it never made a mark on the ice.

Tell him not to waste his money.

The only thing that is going to help is to spread some anti-skid on it.

View attachment 673142
His driveway is close to a mile long. I get your point about the weight. Thanks for responding.
 

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His driveway is close to a mile long. I get your point about the weight. Thanks for responding.
Been there / done that. One person in the bed of a pickup slinging anti skid with a shovel and the other driving slowly along.
 

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Does he have chains?
I know on the Ag tractors running over the ice repeatedly with the chains would scar it up, not sure if a CUT has enough weight for that to be effective.
 

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I agree with Stan. If you have a very long driveway that is covered with thick ice, trying to break it up is an exercise in futility. When it gets thick you can't break it up and you'll never melt it. Anything that COULD break it up would likely do serious damage to the driveway.

The best thing you can do is distribute traction material. Either sand or some form of anti-skid. Sand is the least expensive and very easy to spread. It doesn't take much to give traction. Just a light coating will do. It also helps to melt the ice over time.

I'm not sure what the budget is for a solution. If you want to use a tractor then even a smallish PTO driven spreader would work. There are also small units that attach to a 2" receiver on a pickup truck.

Below is a YouTube video of a guy with the EXACT same problem showing how he is using a spreader on a small tractor.

#132 Kubota B2601 LandPride FSP500 Braodcast Spreader Ice Into Traction - YouTube
 

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Does he have chains?
I know on the Ag tractors running over the ice repeatedly with the chains would scar it up, not sure if a CUT has enough weight for that to be effective.
Chains will scar it up but when the ice gets thick chains won't damage it much. One year I made the mistake of not scraping my gravel driveway bare so the sun would melt it. The left over snow melted down, refroze and became about 1" thick ice. You couldn't walk on it, park on it or drive on it. Salt just drilled little holes down through it. I have chains on my 2720 but it just put little marks in the ice with no real damage of any benefit.

So I went to Lowe's and bought some play sand and spread it around with a shovel. Wow! Instant traction! When the Sun warmed the sand it melted down into the ice a bit and made for good traction. Once the ice eventually melted the sand just disappeared down into the driveway gravel.

I could have also used anti-skid but that stuff isn't as easy to come by as play sand and I'm sure it is more expensive.
 
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My and the farm’s driveways are a sheet of ice also. Only thing when it this cold is like many said sand or ash from wood stove, which I do. Seen neighbor up the road running his 3 point disk up and down his drive, but I don’t think it did much. I know when it starts warming and thawing some, a disk with some weight works or a York rake. I’ve used my York rake before to speed up the process.
 

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I agree with Stan. If you have a very long driveway that is covered with thick ice, trying to break it up is an exercise in futility. When it gets thick you can't break it up and you'll never melt it. Anything that COULD break it up would likely do serious damage to the driveway.

The best thing you can do is distribute traction material. Either sand or some form of anti-skid. Sand is the least expensive and very easy to spread. It doesn't take much to give traction. Just a light coating will do. It also helps to melt the ice over time.

I'm not sure what the budget is for a solution. If you want to use a tractor then even a smallish PTO driven spreader would work. There are also small units that attach to a 2" receiver on a pickup truck.

Below is a YouTube video of a guy with the EXACT same problem showing how he is using a spreader on a small tractor.

#132 Kubota B2601 LandPride FSP500 Braodcast Spreader Ice Into Traction - YouTube
That video makes it look easy. But he doesn’t explain how and where he is storing his anti skid so it doesn’t freeze.

I’ve bought what I thought was very dry sand and anti skid in the summer and stored it in the barn. When I went to use it it was one solid brick. So now I store it in my basement which entails putting it into small buckets, carrying it up and outside, and spreading it by hand.
 

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That video makes it look easy. But he doesn’t explain how and where he is storing his anti skid so it doesn’t freeze.

I’ve bought what I thought was very dry sand and anti skid in the summer and stored it in the barn. When I went to use it it was one solid brick. So now I store it in my basement which entails putting it into small buckets, carrying it up and outside, and spreading it by hand.
I thought he was just using sand. You are correct though, he didn't mention anything about storing it - which is a concern.

That's how I have mine now. I have two 5-gallon buckets with tight fitting lids and the sand has stayed loose for several seasons. I do the same thing with my ice melt. I put one 50 lb. bag at a time in the 5-gallon bucket and keep it sealed. At the beginning of winter I bring both sand and salt buckets up onto the porch. I have some 3-lb. Folgers plastic coffee cans that I drilled holes in the lid. Large holes for the salt and smaller holes for the sand. They have nice finger grooves which allows me to easily and evenly spread either material even with gloves on. Most of the time I'm just treating the sidewalk and area around the vehicles.
 
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