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Being that it will be 100 here today, I'd have to say "no" I'm not thinking about winter yet. If y'all have some cool weather please send some our way.
 

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Once the Z is paid off I want to move up from the X585 to a 3025E. My dealer is also a dealer for HLA and I have been looking at their snowpusher. They have several options like the back drag and I don't see it on the website but also rubber wear edge.

HLA Snow | 1500 SnowPusher

A while back there was a member that was selling a HLA 1500 that he was using on his 1025R. I wasn't ready for one at the time so I just sent him a PM and explained I was thinking about going HLA with a bigger machine, I was wondering why he was selling it as I thought it would be a great option for me. From someone that has used one (at least the HLA) makes me wonder how well it would work for me. I won't quote his entire PM response but I looked it up as it is still in my inbox to pickup a few key points of my thoughts on this.

With a blade the snow spills out on the sides so you don't necessarily trap all that much. Many times you angle the blade to keep working the snow over. That is what I do but I find as the snow gets deeper I am constantly going back over ground I have already plowed. My much lighter X585 (compared to a 3025E) can't push into the banks as they get deeper more so when wet heavy snow. Even with ballast I find the front will just slide out if the blade is angled so I have to straighten it to dig in and move snow. This is where I think a pusher would be better. To a point anyhow. That is where you start to get into is it better to blow or plow/push. For the best of both worlds I am thinking front pusher with rear 3pt blower for my ballast. I can then push the snow out to the driveway out front of the house or away from the buildings far enough so I can then blow and have more options about the direction I am blowing based on wind direction. He said that it works best on pretty flat ground. If you have rolling hills or terrain changes, the pusher won't stay in a position where it is fully riding on the shoes which is where it needs to be to work right. Think of it like a box grader but on the front. If angled up or down too much it will dig in too deep or not enough. This can cause an issue probably the worst on blacktop. More so if you have crack sealant. When it hits this the pusher will shave it off. At least with gravel you can always just regrade everything in the spring. I can see that as my biggest challenge with the terrain of my property having elevation changes and the fact that it is 95% blacktop. It is old blacktop that is in need to replacement so once I rip it out and replace it will probably be fine for a while but it might be an issue at some point again. While you can put the FEL in float, this doesn't help the pusher angle on the dump/curl circuit. About having the FEL in float. He said that worked well but if he had a lot of snow the pusher would start to ride up and he would have to come out of float and force it back down. Of course the other issue is that if doing a long driveway you will need to push it off to the side. For a big chunk of my driveway I do just angle the blade now with the X585 and make a few passes. It is about 10' wide so a pass each direction in the middle pushing out then just a second or third pass each way to open it up a little more. I won't be able to do that with a pusher.

Those where his main points of why it didn't work for him and my thoughts about how they would apply. I agree with many of these and I think I might have the same concerns. because of that I am a bit on the fence on should I go with a decked out HLA or just stick to the FEL mounted blade with pivot on a second function? I have used a bobcat with a pusher on our property in the past and it was so much faster. But I really question if even a 3025E could use it as well as the bobcat.

For the guy that sold his HLA from his 1025R, he has the Frontier SB-1154 and was going with a 60" Compact Tractor Attachment (CTA) blade for the front. Not sure if that was FEL mount or quick hitch. Obviously I would be looking at the FEL mount front blade probably from Frontier if I went that route.
 

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I think what you're describing is a symptom any plow or pusher that hard mounted to a front end loader. The plow/pusher cannot pivot up/down with the terrain. So you put it down to the ground and go. If the terrain dips in front of the tractor, the blade doesn't drop with it and ends up in the air. if the terrain rises in front of the tractor, the blade is driven into the ground lifting up the front wheels. No different than trying to grade with the bucket in dirt.

Now if you look at a plow that is on a vertical pivot, it can float up and down with the terrain freely. The front frame mounted plow does this, and any plow mounted to the front of a truck or UTV does that. It's also usually what they do when putting plows on heavy machinery like skid steers and wheel loaders.


This problem is exactly why chose not to get a hard mounted loader plow or pusher. There is no such thing as flat terrain here. So I took a frame mount UTV plow and attached to my pallet fork frame. Now I have a loader mounted plow that pivots with the terrain. Best of both worlds, no digging or floating.
 

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I think what you're describing is a symptom any plow or pusher that hard mounted to a front end loader. The plow/pusher cannot pivot up/down with the terrain. So you put it down to the ground and go. If the terrain dips in front of the tractor, the blade doesn't drop with it and ends up in the air. if the terrain rises in front of the tractor, the blade is driven into the ground lifting up the front wheels. No different than trying to grade with the bucket in dirt.

Now if you look at a plow that is on a vertical pivot, it can float up and down with the terrain freely. The front frame mounted plow does this, and any plow mounted to the front of a truck or UTV does that. It's also usually what they do when putting plows on heavy machinery like skid steers and wheel loaders.


This problem is exactly why chose not to get a hard mounted loader plow or pusher. There is no such thing as flat terrain here. So I took a frame mount UTV plow and attached to my pallet fork frame. Now I have a loader mounted plow that pivots with the terrain. Best of both worlds, no digging or floating.
The problem is a little more complex. If you look at a pusher it is very similar to a box blade. The box blade has the flat bottom kind of like the flat bottom (shoes) on the pusher. With a box blade you can adjust your top link to change the pitch of the box blade. By extending or shortening the top link it changes the bite of the box blade and that changes if it is picking up dirt or dropping it. With a pusher on a FEL you would use your dump/curl circuit and it will pretty much do the same thing. If you don't have your dump/curl set right, it will cause the shoes not to ride flat on the ground then like with the box blade it will cause the cutting edge to either lift up from the ground (if too much in a dump position) or dig into the ground harder than you want (if in too much of a curl). Most machines have a float function for the boom arms of the FEL but not for the dump/curl. I say most because there was an optional kit for the float detent to be added to the SCV for dump/curl function when using the 45 series FEL on X Series machines. I looked for it when I was setting up my FEL but it wasn't available anymore though I think the parts from the other SCV (for boom arms) could be used. The idea is that it gives you the ability to dump quicker by making it kind of like a trip bucket. Maybe something like that can be done to other machines but I don't know that it would help unless there is enough weight to the pusher to keep it level. Also once pushing snow it might throw it all off. When I used the bobcat it wasn't a big deal because it had a self leveling bucket that took care of this as I don't remember it being a problem.

As far as using float on the boom arms, he mentioned that he does this and it works fine with a little bit of snow but if you get too much it will tend to cause the arms to float up. I don't notice this that much if at all with my quick hitch mounted plow on my X585 but that isn't a snow pusher. Not sure if it is the pivot point issue. If I went the plow option then the question is what one I would go with. I am thinking something like this.

Heavy Duty Loader Mounted Snow Plow - Compact Tractor Attachments

This plow might have the issue you were talking about but one thing that could be done to combat it is to swap the hydraulic lines moving the dump/curl over to the SCV normally used for the boom arms. Then dump/curl would have a float position and you could still move the boom arms but it would be more of a front fixed point like you mentioned since the arms are not floating. Granted you would have to get used to things being backwards for a while with the controls but it might work if it were a problem.

Like I said, not sure if I will go snow pusher or if it is too much of a gamble based on the review that one member had with his 1025R Everyone has different conditions but what he is doing and the challenges that he faced are similar to what I have with my property. He is in WI so similar snow loads to us in MN. I have seen it said where snow pushers are great for clearing those large, flat parking lots. That is where I see them used the most. My driveway does have a lot of space as we have a few large parking areas, but it isn't flat as it transitions from the tuck under garage to the built up area behind the house. Kind of like a reverse walkout.
 

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I suspect you're right about the curl as well. I hadn't ever thought about that, but it would certainly be the same concept. The entire pusher or plow is in a fixed plane off the front of the tractor, and that will only work really well on flat ground. Whether it's the curl of the box or the lift. If you watch videos of the sub compacts using snow pushers, you will see this stuff happening all the time. Usually people end up using down pressure to lift the front wheels up keeping the box firmly on the ground. Super, now you can't steer!

Putting the loader in float has the same impact as trying to dig or grade dirt with it in float. Once it hits some resistance, it folds under itself. So it's usually the first thing people try with the loader mounted pusher or plow and fails immediately. Now, swapping the hydraulic circuits to put the float ability onto the curl... that is creative! I'm not sure the geometry will work well since the plow and box are basically right up at the pivot pins. It may not be enough leverage to pivot properly. But I'd love to see someone try it as that could save a lot of headaches if it works.

The snow plow on the front frame pivots up and down normally and doesn't get sucked down like the loader in float because the geometry is totally different. It's designed to work properly. It would only get pulled down if you hit something immovable, which is what the trip springs are for anyway.
 

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My dealer is also a dealer for HLA and I have been looking at their snowpusher.
I got a HLA with backdrag on it and its working great for me. I plow my drive and several neighbors and I'm very happy about it:good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #27
The HLA's look to be very nice, I really like the curved mold board. I couldn't justify nearly twice the cost for the 1800 series they offer, over the Express Steel version, unfortunately.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I suspect you're right about the curl as well. I hadn't ever thought about that, but it would certainly be the same concept. The entire pusher or plow is in a fixed plane off the front of the tractor, and that will only work really well on flat ground. Whether it's the curl of the box or the lift. If you watch videos of the sub compacts using snow pushers, you will see this stuff happening all the time. Usually people end up using down pressure to lift the front wheels up keeping the box firmly on the ground. Super, now you can't steer!

Putting the loader in float has the same impact as trying to dig or grade dirt with it in float. Once it hits some resistance, it folds under itself. So it's usually the first thing people try with the loader mounted pusher or plow and fails immediately. Now, swapping the hydraulic circuits to put the float ability onto the curl... that is creative! I'm not sure the geometry will work well since the plow and box are basically right up at the pivot pins. It may not be enough leverage to pivot properly. But I'd love to see someone try it as that could save a lot of headaches if it works.

The snow plow on the front frame pivots up and down normally and doesn't get sucked down like the loader in float because the geometry is totally different. It's designed to work properly. It would only get pulled down if you hit something immovable, which is what the trip springs are for anyway.
Try steering when you're pushing a heavy windrow of snow off to the side. The problem exacerbates itself as the windrow gets larger and larger, and then you're left having to take smaller and smaller bites. Theirs pros and cons to both styles of snow movers. I prefer to take all the snow from my drive, out to the road and push it into the ditch. I can't do that with a plow.
 

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Well that illustrates that these things are not just a set of pros and cons, or likes and dislikes. These various configurations have conditions and environments they work great in, and likewise that they are horrible in.


  • If you're plowing a curvy lane a pusher will probably suck and plow will be great.
  • If you can't push snow into large piles at the ends, you would have to use a plow to windrow it to the sides.
  • If you're plowing straight ahead mostly and can pile snow at the ends, a pusher is great and way faster than a plow.
  • If you're plowing something with variable grade, slopes, humps, etc then any hard mounted loader plow/pusher will probably not be ideal. Even worse if you have curves Something that pivots like a traditional plow mount would be best. Whether it's mounted to the front of the tractor as sold by Deere, or a custom mount on the loader.
I'm sure there's more variables to consider. But nonetheless I learned in this exercise last year that simply going on what other people have been happy with is only part of the story. I was about to buy a pusher because everyone was raving about how great they were. It wasn't until I stopped to consider the geometry of my land that I realized it would be the absolute worst piece of equipment I could ever use. Doesn't mean it's bad. Just not appropriate for my application.
 

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Thinking about winter....... That is what we do up here all summer....

Replaced a bearing for the auger chain drive on the 3pt blower. Clean up, lube, touch up paint in a few places, check bolts and all are tight. Test run after all this and ready to go.

Tractor service after garden season is over. Get fuel storage ready for winter fill.

Made up new homemade tire chain tighteners. The old rubber octopus type had flung half there arms off last winter.

If you don't think ahead here, you WILL get bit hard and often by winter.
Otherwise, life as usual in the bush.
 

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I suspect you're right about the curl as well. I hadn't ever thought about that, but it would certainly be the same concept. The entire pusher or plow is in a fixed plane off the front of the tractor, and that will only work really well on flat ground. Whether it's the curl of the box or the lift. If you watch videos of the sub compacts using snow pushers, you will see this stuff happening all the time. Usually people end up using down pressure to lift the front wheels up keeping the box firmly on the ground. Super, now you can't steer!

Putting the loader in float has the same impact as trying to dig or grade dirt with it in float. Once it hits some resistance, it folds under itself. So it's usually the first thing people try with the loader mounted pusher or plow and fails immediately. Now, swapping the hydraulic circuits to put the float ability onto the curl... that is creative! I'm not sure the geometry will work well since the plow and box are basically right up at the pivot pins. It may not be enough leverage to pivot properly. But I'd love to see someone try it as that could save a lot of headaches if it works.

The snow plow on the front frame pivots up and down normally and doesn't get sucked down like the loader in float because the geometry is totally different. It's designed to work properly. It would only get pulled down if you hit something immovable, which is what the trip springs are for anyway.
You know its just a thought but you might be able to simple switch the hydraulic hoses to use the existing float function in the curl position. The really hard part is remembering how the controls now work. Might be something to try before going through all the expense and effort.:unknown:
 

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While I am no where close to the size of equipment you all have I do need to order the chains and front blade for my X370. I am going to try the rubber strap chains. Also have to get some suitcase weights for the rear. I was thinking about a Toro snow blower but I enjoy getting out on my JD and pushing the snow.
 

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Anyone else thinking about winter already?
Tested my snowblower the day I got my tractor !! (June 20th, 2019 ... not a flake in sight...)

Last week, I bought a bunch of wire, connectors, fuse holder, a nice switch, and a 4" stroke linear actuator, to make the chute vertical discharge angle controllable from the seat.

I dunno if it's more "thinkin' of winter"... or maybe just playing with all the stuff in the toybox ;)
 

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While I am no where close to the size of equipment you all have I do need to order the chains and front blade for my X370. I am going to try the rubber strap chains. Also have to get some suitcase weights for the rear. I was thinking about a Toro snow blower but I enjoy getting out on my JD and pushing the snow.
The Terra Grips work well with enough rear ballast. At first, they feel like you are driving with square tires due to the bouncing around between the rubber cross straps, but after awhile, you won't even notice them. They work well on everything except glare ice. I have used them for years and I prefer them over chains as they don't mar the surface or cause any damage to the driveway.

They also don't break cross chains and all of the other failures of the imported tire chains.


Here is what they look like after plowing about 500 driveways, each about 125 foot long....
 

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Discussion Starter #36 (Edited)
Snow push showed up today. Pretty nice overall, couple little dings hear and there. Welds look nice, very uniform, no undercutting. Paint is thick, judging by the few scratches, so I'd say the two coats of enamel is legit. My opinion, is that it looks hard to beat, being US made, and delivered to my driveway, for the money spent.
Rubber scraping edge is standard. After using the conveyor belt on my last rear blade, the verdict is still out on which I like better.
It doesn't have a curved mold board or adjustable skids, like some more expensive brands do. But I do like the internal bracing/gussets that are triangulated and angled down, to keep snow from building up.
Come on snow.
 

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Snow push showed up today. Pretty nice overall, couple little dings hear and there. Welds look nice, very uniform, no undercutting. Paint is thick, judging by the few scratches, so I'd say the two coats of enamel is legit. My opinion, is that it looks hard to beat, being US made, and delivered to my driveway, for the money spent.
Rubber scraping edge is standard. After using the conveyor belt on my last rear blade, the verdict is still out on which I like better.
It doesn't have a curved mold board or adjustable skids, like some more expensive brands do. But I do like the internal bracing/gussets that are triangulated and angled down, to keep snow from building up.
Come on snow.
That looks like a nice piece.
 

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I am thinking about it

I need to finish welding the V-Snow Blower sides and front on. It is just a little welding but I have to carry the blade into my other shop when it is not windy to weld. I would have to move to much stuff to close the drop down door the snow blower is to big. So I need to do the welding and bolt on the ABS Sides. It should work good just pulling it to open a road and backing in the blower will work better this year. I made the chute slipperier and longer plus better skids and Slip Clutch PTO Shaft. This blower is like new not that much use for the 1950's age of it. The cut is 7 ft 9 in. edge to edge. I found out where the trail of snow came from and put a cover over the hole. 100_3187.JPG 100_3184.JPG 100_3181.JPG 100_3191.JPG 100_3263.JPG 100_3275.JPG 100_3280.JPG 100_3287.JPG The 2 ft by 4 ft ABS 1/4" Sheets bolt to the steel sides so the snow will slide by better pulling it to move snow. So I need to weld it cause my 150 Gal Diesel Winter Storage Tank is now empty and the Blower is in front of it!
 
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