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I am curious if anyone had ever dry-aged their own steaks at home...I can buy them, but at $24.95 a pound the thought occurred to me that I might want to consider doing my own. Thoughts anyone?
 

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I am curious if anyone had ever dry-aged their own steaks at home...I can buy them, but at $24.95 a pound the thought occurred to me that I might want to consider doing my own. Thoughts anyone?

Wish I could, but don't have time. :eat:
 

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Don't know much about it, but I think it's easier said than done. You need temperature, moisture control, environment, etc. I don't think you will find any of that equipment cheap. I already looked on Harbor Fright for you:laugh: Part of that $24.95 per pound cost is that there is a lot of loss on scale weight, time it takes & trim loss, etc. I think if aged meat is your thing, you may be better served (no pun intended) to treat yourself every now & then & buy what you would like. I know people who like milk, but the last thing they would want to do is own the cow:laugh:
 

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I am curious if anyone had ever dry-aged their own steaks at home...I can buy them, but at $24.95 a pound the thought occurred to me that I might want to consider doing my own. Thoughts anyone?
We buy our beef and pork from a farm down the street. They also offer aged beef as well. I wouldn't have a clue as to how it's done properly and don't think I'd be inclined to try it on my own.
 

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Not deliberately! :banghead:
 

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I tried it once. Alton Brown did a special on steaks and it really wasn't that difficult. Takes up room in your fridge for a few days though. All in all, it was a neat experience but not really worth the time. I don't usually like to wait 3 days to eat my steak!
 

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Truly aged beef will be aged on the quarter or side, and not as an individual steak. There will be some of the outside of the carcass that will be discarded. Hence why aging cost more, aside from more time, and more work, but weight loss overall. (Sort of like buying boneless, skinless chicken, rather than skinning and boning it from the whole chicken, or a boneless cut of meat v. bone in.)

I honestly don't have the time, or locker to age a side or quarter of beef. If I want something aged that much, for a special meal, I'll just buy it aged at the time.
 

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I have had the meat locker ask me how long I wanted my 1/2 aged. From what I understand, they let it hang in a cooler and let it start to decompose. Being in a cooler it will not go rotten but it lets bacteria start to break down cell structure to gain tenderness.
 

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I have had the meat locker ask me how long I wanted my 1/2 aged. From what I understand, they let it hang in a cooler and let it start to decompose. Being in a cooler it will not go rotten but it lets bacteria start to break down cell structure to gain tenderness.
Yes, the outer part does begin to decompose, and that is the part that is trimmed away and discarded.

Even a freezer just slows down the rate of bacterial overload on things. Otherwise, you could freeze things for 10 years and have no loss of flavor or texture. So, while it may not "rot" while aging, the outermost part surely does degrade, and is less than desirable.
 

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I looked into doing this a long time ago since one of my favorite places uses wet aged beef and just can't get close to the same flavor even out of good Prime beef that is held in the wet aged. It's not worth it unless one devotes a separate fridge just for it and has enough people in the family to eat all of that slab of meat when it's time to trim it up. My kids love good steak and are spoiled rotten with how much they get now but refuse to take that next step in spoiling them that much more. I have a 3 and 8 year old who both want steak not McDonalds or Arby's or Wendy's, they want steak. If they could have it their way we would go out to a Japanese steakhouse every day. And it's not the show they enjoy it's the food. Clean plates every time. I enjoy most things from a Japanese steak house but it's not the same as a high temp broiler. They get a babysitter most times we go to true steak houses but have to keep that a secret since they know what they are too lol.
 

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Steaks, 'round here, don't last long enough to age.
If I know ahead of time I'm cooking steaks on the grill outside, sometimes I buy them on Wednesday, open them up and put them on a pan, and just put them in the fridge.
When you start to see a slight "film" on the meat, that's what you're looking for.
It's a normal bacteria breaking down the enzymes in the meat, which makes them much more tender when cooked.
It wont hurt you, try it out. Normally takes 3-4 days.
 

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Steaks, 'round here, don't last long enough to age.
If I know ahead of time I'm cooking steaks on the grill outside, sometimes I buy them on Wednesday, open them up and put them on a pan, and just put them in the fridge.
When you start to see a slight "film" on the meat, that's what you're looking for.
It's a normal bacteria breaking down the enzymes in the meat, which makes them much more tender when cooked.
It wont hurt you, try it out. Normally takes 3-4 days.
I let mine sit out and then pull from fridge before cooking to let them get to room temp. An old farmer that used to be our hand on the ranch let his sit out till they were almost black. I couldn't bare trying one; although, everything else he cooked was always great so imagine they were too.
 

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Yes, the outer part does begin to decompose, and that is the part that is trimmed away and discarded.

Even a freezer just slows down the rate of bacterial overload on things. Otherwise, you could freeze things for 10 years and have no loss of flavor or texture. So, while it may not "rot" while aging, the outermost part surely does degrade, and is less than desirable.
The freezer stops bacterial growth, but there is a myriad of complex chemical reactions that are just slowed waaaaaaaaaaay down. Then there are the minute freeze/thaw cycles that happen when you open the door, or during defrost cycles (if it's a frost free unit) that cause freezer burn.

Dry aging is a good thing if you have a good fat cover. If you don't, you won't have anything to trim away when it turns black and nasty.
For some reason the connective tissue starts to break down before the muscle, so it works out good. Another benefit is that you lose allot of the excess moisture, and the meat firms up nice. But that's why dry aged beef is so damned expensive.

I usually try to let my personal stash hang for 2 or 3 weeks, but sometimes they aren't fat enough so I only go 10 days.
 
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