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I'm curious for those who have shares in Deere & Company what your thoughts on the stock are. Have you been happy with the dividends (.60 isn't too bad), have you sold off any shares for a profit, etc. ?? I notice that in the last two years the share price has gone from around $75 up to $170, not a shabby increase and maybe reason to sell for those that hold it. I don't have any yet but have it on my watchlist to buy when and if it drops lower, (not sure what my threshold is to buy yet).
 

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I'm curious for those who have shares in Deere & Company what your thoughts on the stock are. Have you been happy with the dividends (.60 isn't too bad), have you sold off any shares for a profit, etc. ?? I notice that in the last two years the share price has gone from around $75 up to $170, not a shabby increase and maybe reason to sell for those that hold it. I don't have any yet but have it on my watchlist to buy when and if it drops lower, (not sure what my threshold is to buy yet).
:banghead: now that is a nice price increase for sure. i sure wished the Pepsi stock i had for several yrs would of did that well. it didn't even come close to that price increase.
 

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I'm curious for those who have shares in Deere & Company what your thoughts on the stock are. Have you been happy with the dividends (.60 isn't too bad), have you sold off any shares for a profit, etc. ?? I notice that in the last two years the share price has gone from around $75 up to $170, not a shabby increase and maybe reason to sell for those that hold it. I don't have any yet but have it on my watchlist to buy when and if it drops lower, (not sure what my threshold is to buy yet).
I have held Deere stock directly for some time. My avg cost basis is $81.71 per share. Right now, Deere in my portfolio has a deferred gain of 103.98% and I have no plans to sell. Deere represents about 3% of my total portfolio at this time in direct holdings. In indirect holdings through ETF's, I hold another roughly 4% of that in a Non qualified portfolio value.

I don't buy it for the dividend and always use the dividend upon X date to add to the holding. Since the dividend distribution by design reduces the share price when declared, it's always best to use it for dollar cost averaging when possible if you don't need the current income. In a tax qualified plan in the U.S., it defers the gain and prevents it being taxed as a dividend, but it can ultimately result in it being taxed as ordinary income upon distribution.

I don't have a sell order on my Deere holdings at any valuation and doubt that I would institute one. For me, Deere is clearly a long term investment. On the other hand, I am not sure I would buy any more right now with the issues with the impact on the Tariffs pending and how other nations are going to respond to the tariffs could impact Deere's results next year, but I don't see that as a reason to sell Deere.

Based upon Deere's current financial reports, I see about $215 as the high side which would result in the value being very speculative. Should it reach that number without changes in the underlying financial results to support such a valuation, then I would consider selling some to avoid losing that gain when the pullback occurs.

Historically, one of the fastest way to lose money seems to be to short Deere stock.......Yet some institutional investors still haven't seemed to learn this.

I spend most of my days on issues like this.

For the last year plus, I been actively trading leveraged ETF's. My most aggressive trades right now in the ETF universe are 300% (3X) Bullish on the Russian economy. These are EXTREMELY VOLATILE and must be TRADED and not held as investments. This specific ETF is up today 3.35% but this changes constantly. The RUSL is up YTD about 26% but again, this is not something that people should invest in if you don't understand the impact of being triple leveraged in a bullish fashion. In summary, for every 1% the Russian economy declines, the account decreases in value by 3%. For every 1% the Russian index increases in value, the account GAINS 3%.......Also, it's crucial to understand how the index is compiled and the mathmatecial assumptions in calculating the index valuation and how it impacts the ETF.

This same company offers a Bearish fund on the Russian economy with leverages as well. While i have been bullish on the Russian economy, I have a Bearish position on the Brazilian economy in another fund.

I want to point out that leveraged ETF's are NOT for everyone and are NOT something which can merely be invested in due to their design. They require a lot of attention and money invested in these is subject to loss daily.

These are my personal opinions and are not to be construed at Investment Advice. Each person should always perform their own analysis and make their own determinations as to what is suitable for them based upon their risk tolerance, investment objectives and investment time frames.
 

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I'm curious for those who have shares in Deere & Company what your thoughts on the stock are. Have you been happy with the dividends (.60 isn't too bad), have you sold off any shares for a profit, etc. ?? I notice that in the last two years the share price has gone from around $75 up to $170, not a shabby increase and maybe reason to sell for those that hold it. I don't have any yet but have it on my watchlist to buy when and if it drops lower, (not sure what my threshold is to buy yet).
Depending upon the perception of the impacts, if any, of the export trade on Deere due to the steel and aluminum tariff's, this might result in a decline in the stock price. But if that occurs, expect an initial over reaction, which is typical and then it should return to a reasonable valuation based upon the realities of Deere's stewardship.

Personally, and each person needs to make their own decision on such issues, I would only add to my current holdings if the price declined to around $118, but I don't see that happening at this time. Historically, Deere is the type of company that generally doesn't have many surprises based upon the way it is operated and the markets which it is in.

The last time Deere traded in the $118 range was late August, early September of last year. One other point, I don't recall a time when Deere traded over $100 a share prior to when it crossed that threshold last summer.

Keep in mind that the U.S.'s largest farm commodity grain export is soybeans (generally and such data is woefully outdated at the World Trade Organizations website with the 2017 data not expected until late June 2018) and if there is retaliation in this trade issue which is directed at the crop exports in the U.S., it will likely depress the prices of those commodities and that will pressure agricultural producers bottom lines, which is likely to impact their decision on capital expenditures for new Deere or other ag equipment.

Once again, these are my personal opinions and each person must perform their own analysis and make their own decisions based upon their investment goals, opinions of the impacts on financial markets, risk tolerances and their investment time horizon.
 

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Always a good and interesting read

I have held Deere directly stock for some time. My avg cost basis is $81.71 per share. Right now, Deere in my portfolio has a deferred gain of 103.98% and I have no plans to sell. Deere represents about 3% of my total portfolio at this time in direct holdings. In indirect holdings through ETF's, I hold another roughly 4% of that in a Non qualified portfolio value.

I don't buy it for the dividend and always use the dividend upon X date to add to the holding. Since the dividend distribution by design reduces the share price when declared, it's always best to use it for dollar cost averaging when possible if you don't need the current income. In a tax qualified plan in the U.S., it defers the gain and prevents it being taxed as a dividend, but it can ultimately result in it being taxed as ordinary income upon distribution.

I don't have a sell order on my Deere holdings at any valuation and doubt that I would institute one. For me, Deere is clearly a long term investment. On the other hand, I am not sure I would buy any more right now with the issues with the impact on the Tariffs pending and how other nations are going to respond to the tariffs could impact Deere's results next year, but I don't see that as a reason to sell Deere.

Based upon Deere's current financial reports, I see about $215 as the high side which would result in the value being very speculative. Should it reach that number without changes in the underlying financial results to support such a valuation, then I would consider selling some to avoid losing that gain when the pullback occurs.

Historically, one of the fastest way to lose money seems to be to short Deere stock.......Yet some institutional investors still haven't seemed to learn this.

I spend most of my days on issues like this.

For the last year plus, I been actively trading leveraged ETF's. My most aggressive trades right now in the ETF universe are 300% (3X) Bullish on the Russian economy. These are EXTREMELY VOLATILE and must be TRADED and not held as investments. This specific ETF is up today 3.35% but this changes constantly. The RUSL is up YTD about 26% but again, this is not something that people should invest in if you don't understand the impact of being triple leveraged in a bullish fashion. In summary, for every 1% the Russian economy declines, the account decreases in value by 3%. For every 1% the Russian index increases in value, the account GAINS 3%.......Also, it's crucial to understand how the index is compiled and the mathmatecial assumptions in calculating the index valuation and how it impacts the ETF.

This same company offers a Bearish fund on the Russian economy with leverages as well. While i have been bullish on the Russian economy, I have a Bearish position on the Brazilian economy in another fund.

I want to point out that leveraged ETF's are NOT for everyone and are NOT something which can merely be invested in due to their design. They require a lot of attention and money invested in these is subject to loss daily.

These are my personal opinions and are not to be construed at Investment Advice. Each person should always perform their own analysis and make their own determinations as to what is suitable for them based upon their risk tolerance, investment objectives and investment time frames.
Sulleybear-

Your comments are always interesting and educational. The comment above served to reinforce what I pretty much decided long ago. I don't have the passion, knowledge or desire to be a stock trader and therefore, I'd better stick to safer and less lucrative pursuits. It's not that I don't own stocks, I do but they are pretty mundane stocks and I do reinvest the dividends. 3 or four times a year I look at a stock and try to figure out if it's doing what I want/need it to do. If so, it stays. If not, I'll see what the tax consequences of selling might be and decide if long term, I need to do something else. I seldom sell but if the opportunity presents itself to lock in a profit, that's always on the table.

Going short, leveraging ETF's etc. is way, way, way out of my league. Should I try to do that, I think I would find a quick way to go broke. To use a familiar quotation, "A man's got to know his limitations." My hat's off to you and I'm sure you do extremely well. I'm equally sure that I'd be a disaster trying to copy what you do but thanks for the education. It's a peak into a different world.

Treefarmer
 

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I have a little. Did have a lot, but sold it forty years ago to buy something. Don't remember what, probably something fast. Should have kept it, like a lot of other things. If nothing else, it could come in handy if there is a serious problem with a piece of equipment with no resolution. One can always mention that they are a stockholder.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
The few bucks I have in stocks for trading are held in a TFSA, (similar to a Roth IRA). The only ETF I have is in cannabis, and it is doing very well; too bad I don't have more in there. Who would ever think I would be making money legally trading in cannabis. :laugh: This trading money is only money I can "afford" to lose. My retirement and income money is in areas a little less speculative at this stage of my life.

OOPs, have to make a correction, I just checked that ETF and it is down .15 so far today. Still okay overall though. :gizmo:
 

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DE Stock

I have a position in DE in both my IRA & regular accounts. Green is my favorite color. I even have some from a 2/1 stock split. Four years ago I bought some for around $60. My original goal was to sell @ $100. Glad I didn't! I've been involved in some aspect of farming for 50+ years and watched many cycles. I bought my farm in the 80's when the government had the whole herd buyout of dairy farms. It appears to me that farm equipment manufacturing is going to have an uptick even though commodity prices are at break even prices. Ag machines wear out. If anyone follows MachineryPete on YouTube, check what good low hours tractors and combines are selling for. Sometimes more then what they sold for new. Eventually the used machinery inventory will dry up and farmers will have to buy new. Plus if you follow DE you know that last year they bought Wirtgren (sp). A German road construction manufacture. The purchase added a chunk to DE's bottom line. DE's price, $167 (3-9), is hard to swallow to purchase 100 shares, but I see it going to $200. Just my opinion.
 

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My avg cost basis is $81.71 per share. Right now, Deere in my portfolio has a deferred gain of 103.98% and I have no plans to sell.
$81.85/103.95% here. :)

I don't have a lot. I don't buy many individual stocks. I'm what's been classified in another thread as the type that only buys something that I have a direct interest in. I believe in Deere, so I'll hold on to it.
 

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Sulleybear-

Your comments are always interesting and educational. The comment above served to reinforce what I pretty much decided long ago. I don't have the passion, knowledge or desire to be a stock trader and therefore, I'd better stick to safer and less lucrative pursuits. It's not that I don't own stocks, I do but they are pretty mundane stocks and I do reinvest the dividends. 3 or four times a year I look at a stock and try to figure out if it's doing what I want/need it to do. If so, it stays. If not, I'll see what the tax consequences of selling might be and decide if long term, I need to do something else. I seldom sell but if the opportunity presents itself to lock in a profit, that's always on the table.

Going short, leveraging ETF's etc. is way, way, way out of my league. Should I try to do that, I think I would find a quick way to go broke. To use a familiar quotation, "A man's got to know his limitations." My hat's off to you and I'm sure you do extremely well. I'm equally sure that I'd be a disaster trying to copy what you do but thanks for the education. It's a peak into a different world.

Treefarmer
Thank you for the kind words and compliment. I have always respected your input and opinion. I have also enjoyed our "conversations" via email. etc.

I have made sure that all of the aggressive positions represent a very small part of my portfolio and net worth. Even if the money invested in higher risk investments dropped dramatically in value, it would have no impact on the financial security I have created to protect my wife. I want to be clear that such aggressive positions as the leveraged ETF's, options trades, etc. always represent less than 5% of my portfolio.

Also, this is an important distinction that I want to make sure is clear. While I don't frequently trade equities since I buy and hold them after extensive consideration, on the other hand, the leveraged ETF's (those which are 2x, 3x, etc,) MUST BE traded daily to AVOID the risk of holding them. Those investments, to avoid over simplifying them, "reset" to some extent each day. Generally, you want to avoid buying and holding leveraged ETF's as they are designed to be traded. Most are very clear about this in their prospectus or disclosure and marketing paperwork. This is a very important distinction.

I do want to clarify that established U.S. Equity ETF's (as well as many others) can be great investments as they are more liquid than mutual funds as they trade at current value throughout the trading day, verses mutual funds which typically trade at N.A.V. at market close. Generally, non leveraged ETF's are not "actively managed". They are subject to the daily re-balancing which must occur to continue to represent their underlying index, based upon their mathematical formula and their method of valuation.

By no means do I want people reading this to assume all ETF's are high risk investments as that is not the case.
In fact, many of the well managed ETF's based upon well established indexes are less risky than many mutual funds. The ETF's which leverage indexes (2x, 3x, etc) ARE much higher risk because of how they undertake such multiples. Please make sure that anyone considering these understands how to measure the risk and volatility of such investments. If you don't understand these, do not allow yourself to be tempted based upon the posted returns you see.

Today and Tomorrow mark the anniversary of two
very important events in our nations investment markets history.


Today is the anniversary of the date in 2009 when the market began it's
increase in index numbers (S&P500, etc.) following the Financial Crisis of 2008 - 2009.



Tomorrow is the 18th anniversary of the peak NASDAQ value at 5,048.62,
preceeding the "Dot Com" collapse which took place starting on March 10th, 2000.



I saw the "Dot.Com" bubble coming which took place beginning 18 years ago tomorrow. I want to point out somethings which I noticed occurring in the 1997 to 2001 era which made things overly speculative.

- The tax reform act of 1997 resulted in drastic changes to the Capital Gain taxes, lowering them. This diminished investors concern about investment holding periods when the tax burden of gains were reduced.

- The individual home exclusion was enacted which exempted the first $500,000 of taxable gains on the sale of your personal residence from inclusion in your taxable income as a gain. This fueled home sales and also encouraged home equity borrowing for riskier portfolio investing by "day traders".

- In the time frame of 1990 to 1998, the number of households owning personal computers dramatically increased from roughly 1 in 7 homes to about 1 in every 3 homes. This introduced more people to "Day Trading", which also was a huge component in the "Dot.com" collapse.

-Individual investors were making purchase decisions and executing trades directly, without a brokers oversight or involvement in large numbers for the first time in history. The "Day Traders" were frequently in the news because of the few which actually made a living doing it. Just as quickly as they came into being based upon the advances of technology and the mad dash for capital and "Dot.Com" IPO's, they vanished when the companies collapsed.

These four events, along with a strong economy, led to people accessing their home equity and in many cases, recklessly investing in anything which had a "Dot.com" after it's name. As history has shown, just as was the case in the stock market crash of 1929, over speculation by unsophisticated investors created a bubble which led to significant and rapid decline in equity values. The result was wide spread economic collapse and economic devastation to many in the U.S. economy.

In 1929, much of the stock which was purchased and then collapsed in value had been bought on margin, with very few restrictions. There were no margin limits like there are today. Investors used the perceived value of their holdings as collateral for increased borrowing, which fueled even more speculative purchases and greater debt. This debt ultimately was proven to be unsecured, even though the stock was pledged as collateral as margin accounts at that time were largely collateralized only by the equity holdings in the portfolio. Worthless paper permitted more borrowing to purchase more worthless paper. Subsequent SEC rules and imposed limits under new regulation ended the reckless margin account activity which fueled the recklessness which in large part, led to the 1929 stock market collapse.

In 2000, it was even worse in some ways because much of the trading was done with the perceived equity which had been borrowed by investors using their homes as collateral. So when the "Dot.Com's" collapsed, it led to record foreclosures at that time and general economic malaise due to residential real estate value decline. What began with the market collapse which followed the March 10, 2000 record NASDAQ close was extended by the events of 9/11/2001.

Another very disturbing trend which I do see continuing today is the insistence of multi billion dollar valuations of companies which have never made a profit and in some cases, have never even sold their product or they are yet to provide their companies services to customers. These are companies which are raising capital in various ways. A start up companies ability to attract new investors has very little to do with it's long term survival and economic viability. Real lasting value comes from companies that actually can produce profitable results from their operation. I believe very strongly in the fundamentals of a companies P&L and balance sheet and not in the market hype of future projections and IPO's.

Tomorrow marks the 18th anniversary of March 10th, 2000, the day the NASDAQ peaked at 5,048.62. Over the next 30 months, it fell 78% and of course, the events of 9/11 accelerated the decline and prolonged the fall. These events occur when people ignore the fundamentals of investing and chase returns. Is that what is happening right now to some degree?

I do feel that we are in very dangerous times due to the high valuations of many investments. I am NOT saying the conditions today are the same as they were in 2000, but such drastic increases in value warrant careful analysis and consideration. Is now the time to be investing? Depends entirely upon the specific company being considered. It is more important than ever to be able to measure investment risk and to be able to properly assess diversification.

Guess what? The market just closed and NASDAQ hit an all time record high at 7,560.81.........Just like the record high it achieved 18 years ago tomorrow.......What does this mean? I will share my $0.02 cents if anyone is interested............
 

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The few bucks I have in stocks for trading are held in a TFSA, (similar to a Roth IRA). The only ETF I have is in cannabis, and it is doing very well; too bad I don't have more in there. Who would ever think I would be making money legally trading in cannabis. :laugh: This trading money is only money I can "afford" to lose. My retirement and income money is in areas a little less speculative at this stage of my life.

OOPs, have to make a correction, I just checked that ETF and it is down .15 so far today. Still okay overall though. :gizmo:
Which ETF do you have that invests in cannabis? I would appreciate being able to look it up in my research sources which cover a wide range of global investments. If you could provide it's name or trading symbols, I would appreciate it. It doesn't matter if its a "Canada Only" company, I would still be able to see it's composition, etc. which is my main interest.

Just as many "Gold ETF's" actually invest in the stocks of mining companies and hold no gold themselves, there are some who do hold "flake" and then of course, combinations of both while others only trade in futures of companies actually directly and indirectly in the industry. I would like to see how the cannabis ETF is structured, just out of personal curiosity. Also, I would like to see how it's owned by institutions.

I would imagine many of the companies in the cannabis industry would likely be considered "Micro" sized companies or even smaller, as a company with up to $500 million dollar in sales is considered a "small business" in the scope of investments for regulatory purposes. Curios to see who the players are in this industry. Thanks.
 

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Neat gift for Grandkids, etc. Disney Stock Certificates

I have a little. Did have a lot, but sold it forty years ago to buy something. Don't remember what, probably something fast. Should have kept it, like a lot of other things. If nothing else, it could come in handy if there is a serious problem with a piece of equipment with no resolution. One can always mention that they are a stockholder.
Back when stock certificates were still used and held as representative of one's ownership position, Disney was often purchased in 1 share or other small share quantities so that parents / grandparents could present the Disney stock certificate to the little kids. The Disney shares are one of the most common ones in Scripophily and are still sold online for the same reason.

Scripophily is the collection of stock certificate documents. Since the certificates represented a investment value, they are part of documents collected by those interested in numismatics (the collection of money, coins, etc.).

People who already own Disney stock can order the certificates at the link below for $50. If any of you own Disney stock and want to make a neat gift for kids or grand kids, check into this as the majority of paper Scripophily ceased to be issued as far back as the 1990's and before, while Disney was doing this up until 2013. But you have to already own the shares of Disney if you want a certificate issued in your loved one's name.


The Walt Disney Company Collectible Shareholder Certificate - buy one share of Disney from us and you are eligible

If you don't own Disney stock already, you will have to buy a certificate on the used market which will not actually represent share ownership and will likely have someone elses name on it, but will have special meaning for Disney fans.


The amount of engraving and incredible detail in many of the very old certificates makes them very suitable for framing as they are actually beautiful documents, unlike anything issued today for commerce. Even the new Disney certificates are colorful and something not many will have down the road.
 

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Please share

Thank you for the kind words and compliment. I have always respected your input and opinion. I have also enjoyed our "conversations" via email. etc.

I have made sure that all of the aggressive positions represent a very small part of my portfolio and net worth. Even if the money invested in higher risk investments dropped dramatically in value, it would have no impact on the financial security I have created to protect my wife. I want to be clear that such aggressive positions as the leveraged ETF's, options trades, etc. always represent less than 5% of my portfolio.

. . . .

-Individual investors were making purchase decisions and executing trades directly, without a brokers oversight or involvement in large numbers for the first time in history. The "Day Traders" were frequently in the news because of the few which actually made a living doing it. Just as quickly as they came into being based upon the advances of technology and the mad dash for capital and "Dot.Com" IPO's, they vanished when the companies collapsed.

These four events, along with a strong economy, led to people accessing their home equity and in many cases, recklessly investing in anything which had a "Dot.com" after it's name. As history has shown, just as was the case in the stock market crash of 1929, over speculation by unsophisticated investors created a bubble which led to significant and rapid decline in equity values. The result was wide spread economic collapse and economic devastation to many in the U.S. economy.

In 1929, much of the stock which was purchased and then collapsed in value had been bought on margin, with very few restrictions. There were no margin limits like there are today. Investors used the perceived value of their holdings as collateral for increased borrowing, which fueled even more speculative purchases and greater debt. This debt ultimately was proven to be unsecured, even though the stock was pledged as collateral as margin accounts at that time were largely collateralized only by the equity holdings in the portfolio. Worthless paper permitted more borrowing to purchase more worthless paper. Subsequent SEC rules and imposed limits under new regulation ended the reckless margin account activity which fueled the recklessness which in large part, led to the 1929 stock market collapse.

In 2000, it was even worse in some ways because much of the trading was done with the perceived equity which had been borrowed by investors using their homes as collateral. So when the "Dot.Com's" collapsed, it led to record foreclosures at that time and general economic malaise due to residential real estate value decline. What began with the market collapse which followed the March 10, 2000 record NASDAQ close was extended by the events of 9/11/2001.

Another very disturbing trend which I do see continuing today is the insistence of multi billion dollar valuations of companies which have never made a profit and in some cases, have never even sold their product or they are yet to provide their companies services to customers. These are companies which are raising capital in various ways. A start up companies ability to attract new investors has very little to do with it's long term survival and economic viability. Real lasting value comes from companies that actually can produce profitable results from their operation. I believe very strongly in the fundamentals of a companies P&L and balance sheet and not in the market hype of future projections and IPO's.

Tomorrow marks the 18th anniversary of March 10th, 2000, the day the NASDAQ peaked at 5,048.62. Over the next 30 months, it fell 78% and of course, the events of 9/11 accelerated the decline and prolonged the fall. These events occur when people ignore the fundamentals of investing and chase returns. Is that what is happening right now to some degree?

I do feel that we are in very dangerous times due to the high valuations of many investments. I am NOT saying the conditions today are the same as they were in 2000, but such drastic increases in value warrant careful analysis and consideration. Is now the time to be investing? Depends entirely upon the specific company being considered. It is more important than ever to be able to measure investment risk and to be able to properly assess diversification.

Guess what? The market just closed and NASDAQ hit an all time record high at 7,560.81.........Just like the record high it achieved 18 years ago tomorrow.......What does this mean? I will share my $0.02 cents if anyone is interested............
Please share what you are comfortable sharing. You are much more knowledgeable in this area than I am so pretty much any information is knowledge to me.

Treefarmer
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hey Sulley, the ETF I bought into is HMMJ, it is an Horizons fund. They are holding in most of the cannabis producers in Canada with the majority in the major players of course. This whole cannabis sector has gone nuts and has a huge potential for the speculator. I know people that have already made 100's of K already specifically in ACB and WEED. I only have a few K in here but it's fun to watch.
 

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So, uhhh.... What's goin on? :unknown:
:unknown:i am deeply worried if i had any jd stock right now, it would be dropping in price,
 

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So, uhhh.... What's goin on? :unknown:
Closed today at $148.00

:unknown:i am deeply worried if i had any jd stock right now, it would be dropping in price,
I'm not even an amateur at the stock market Jim, but as I see it, it all depends on what you paid for it. For the tiny amount that I have, I'm good.
 

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Closed today at $148.00



I'm not even an amateur at the stock market Jim, but as I see it, it all depends on what you paid for it. For the tiny amount that I have, I'm good.
i wish i had some jd stock, but i don't.

what i'm worried is that with jd sourcing most of it's product globally, them parts are gonna get less now.

so then i'm afraid them having less parts, is gonna raise the price of my gator later this summer, due to less of them on the market. jd had 0% till the first of this yr on the gators, then raised it to 3.9%, what will it raise to-later when they aren't able to produce them-due to loss of parts.:banghead::dunno: just scared for the outcome.
 
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