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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I ripped out the old wrap-around deck steps today, because they were installed (by a "professional builder) with the stair stringers right on (in) the ground. No concrete, blocks, or even a patio paver under them. So they rotted out. OK, old steps gone.

I'm trying to decide if I should set new stringers on deck blocks, solid concrete blocks, or dig out a full length footer, and pour concrete. The problem is I can't get a concrete truck anywhere near where I need the concrete, so wondering how well it may go, to move about 1.5 yards of concrete from the road, to the back of the house, and actually get it there. :laugh:

How many trips with the 61" bucket on my JD4100? Probably can't carry more than half a bucket load at a time, and can it be successfully dumped it into the dug out footers?

Anyone here ever done it? Another option would be to rent a mixer, and mix 50 80 lb bags, on-site. Not looking forward to that, but...

What you say?
 

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People do it all the time but I don’t recommend it. Any that splashes on to your tractor and doesn’t get washed right away is there forever. Somebody hauled concrete with my tooth bucket on the bobcat could have been 20 years ago. There is still pieces of it in the corner of the bucket in the back. You would think it was welded to the steel.

Most of the concrete guys have buggies, You might see if the company hauling it has one, otherwise a wheelbarrow.
 

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I saw these Diamond Piers used on a recent episode of This Old House. Since they don't post their shows any more, I found a video of them being used on Hometime. I'd not seen or heard of them before, but the real beauty is that there is no concrete to be poured, and a minimal hole to dig.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dXqDaVj3mQ
 

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I ripped out the old wrap-around deck steps today, because they were installed (by a "professional builder) with the stair stringers right on (in) the ground. No concrete, blocks, or even a patio paver under them. So they rotted out. OK, old steps gone.

I'm trying to decide if I should set new stringers on deck blocks, solid concrete blocks, or dig out a full length footer, and pour concrete. The problem is I can't get a concrete truck anywhere near where I need the concrete, so wondering how well it may go, to move about 1.5 yards of concrete from the road, to the back of the house, and actually get it there. :laugh:

How many trips with the 61" bucket on my JD4100? Probably can't carry more than half a bucket load at a time, and can it be successfully dumped it into the dug out footers?

Anyone here ever done it? Another option would be to rent a mixer, and mix 50 80 lb bags, on-site. Not looking forward to that, but...

What you say?
Been there and just done that last month. Not into a footer but mixed 70, 80 lb bags for a sidewalk. We rented a 6 cubic ft. gas mixer, and I used my 2520 with 61" bucket for the wheelbarrow. One word....awesome!:good2:

We probably could have mixed 6 bags at a time, but to keep any "spillage" (while mixing) out of the picture, we kept it at 5 bags a mix. The bucket would have been able to handle a bit more for sure. All in all, using the tractor as a wheelbarrow was, as I said awesome.

If you decide to use a truck, just ask him to keep the mix on the dry side, so you don't "spill" any. You should be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
pressure treated on the ground now will probably outlast the rest of your deck.
The PT lumber I'm seeing in the local box store chains is marked "Not for ground contact", so if the "good stuff" is still available, it seems more like a special-order. But the other reason for not putting stair stringers right on the ground, seems to me, would be that they aill tend to work down into the ground. There are 22 stringers, so the lwidth of the steps is over 30 feet. Gotta keep'em all level.

People do it all the time but I don’t recommend it. Any that splashes on to your tractor and doesn’t get washed right away is there forever. Somebody hauled concrete with my tooth bucket on the bobcat could have been 20 years ago. There is still pieces of it in the corner of the bucket in the back. You would think it was welded to the steel.

Yes, that's a good point, and something that would probably not be noticed until well after there was paint damage to the tractor.

Most of the concrete guys have buggies, You might see if the company hauling it has one, otherwise a wheelbarrow.
Never thought of that. Will call to inq on the cost.

I saw these Diamond Piers used on a recent episode of This Old House. Since they don't post their shows any more, I found a video of them being used on Hometime. I'd not seen or heard of them before, but the real beauty is that there is no concrete to be poured, and a minimal hole to dig.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dXqDaVj3mQ
Way over the top for my application, but that was interesting.



Been there and just done that last month. Not into a footer but mixed 70, 80 lb bags for a sidewalk. We rented a 6 cubic ft. gas mixer, and I used my 2520 with 61" bucket for the wheelbarrow. One word....awesome!:good2:

We probably could have mixed 6 bags at a time, but to keep any "spillage" (while mixing) out of the picture, we kept it at 5 bags a mix. The bucket would have been able to handle a bit more for sure. All in all, using the tractor as a wheelbarrow was, as I said awesome.

If you decide to use a truck, just ask him to keep the mix on the dry side, so you don't "spill" any. You should be fine.
Good job. Thanks for your feedback.
 

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Around here you have to have a 5 yard minimum before a truck shows up. That might answer your question right there if you are only doing 1.5 yards. I know the big box stores sell preformed concrete blocks to set posts in, is that not an option for your situation? I think can you also get some concrete discs or pucks. They sell those for setting posts on for a pole building. That might work better.
 

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Around here you have to have a 5 yard minimum before a truck shows up. That might answer your question right there if you are only doing 1.5 yards. I know the big box stores sell preformed concrete blocks to set posts in, is that not an option for your situation? I think can you also get some concrete discs or pucks. They sell those for setting posts on for a pole building. That might work better.
Do a search for a "Mini Mix" in your area. They deliver small loads.
 

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The PT lumber I'm seeing in the local box store chains is marked "Not for ground contact", so if the "good stuff" is still available, it seems more like a special-order.
Home Depot and Lowes vary in lumber from area to area, as I found looking for western red cedar here in the Southeastern US.

But my local stores carry ground contact rated pressure treated in the sizes from 4x6 and larger. They also have 4x4 ground contact, but they keep them out in the outdoor garden areas with the fencing rather than in the lumber aisles.
 

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Did it a couple years ago to pour a section of sidewalk across the lawn instead of pulling the truck onto it and making ruts.

Spray down the whole front end first and drive carefully, dump and repeat, then make sure you rinse thoroughly. No issues and great time and labor saver!
 

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I ripped out the old wrap-around deck steps today, because they were installed (by a "professional builder) with the stair stringers right on (in) the ground. No concrete, blocks, or even a patio paver under them. So they rotted out. OK, old steps gone.

I'm trying to decide if I should set new stringers on deck blocks, solid concrete blocks, or dig out a full length footer, and pour concrete. The problem is I can't get a concrete truck anywhere near where I need the concrete, so wondering how well it may go, to move about 1.5 yards of concrete from the road, to the back of the house, and actually get it there.


How many trips with the 61" bucket on my JD4100? Probably can't carry more than half a bucket load at a time, and can it be successfully dumped it into the dug out footers?

Anyone here ever done it? Another option would be to rent a mixer, and mix 50 80 lb bags, on-site. Not looking forward to that, but...

What you say?
I’ve used mine a few times. You get maybe two wheelbarrow loads per bucket. It’s gonna splash. My back sure felt better. My 4100 isn’t a shed queen. When I washed it off it was fine. Before starting spray the bucket inside and out with form release oil. Spray down anything on the tractor you’re afraid will get concrete on it far as that goes. Pressure wash it when the jobs done. Or you can just wet the tractor down with water before you start. Rinse it off when it splashes if you do that. Don’t overload it though. Stay safe.
 

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Like some others I've used my bucket to mix sacks of sakrete in my bucket. I mixed 3 bags at a time could have mixed 4 maybe 5 but for me 3 the easiest. Doing 3 bags at a time and 25 bags each pour would take me apx 2 - 2 1/2 hrs. Admit using a smaller mixer would have been quicker and easier.
 

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My kid's playhouse is on the blocks. I used masonry string and a bubble level to dig close to level pads for each block. I used fine rock on the pads to level and fine tune the height of each block. There are several inches of dirt around each block so that heave would have to be from a really long cold spell (for TN). The ground drains so fast too (not level) that it doesn't stay that wet.

 

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I had a set of stairs from my deck that were sitting on nothing but concrete 1'x1' pavers. Slope them back a hair water runs off. But I only had 3 risers, so it was easy to get them level. For the OP, the pavers would work, but would be a LOT of work to try to get them all level.
 
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