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Picked up another egg today. Finally got my XL to go with my large and small.

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You are going to like that XL, I have the xl and the l and never run out of room when cooking. :good2:
 

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So what is it about those big green eggs? Are they that much better than a regular grill/smoker?
 

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So what is it about those big green eggs? Are they that much better than a regular grill/smoker?
In a word, yes. When it comes to grills, I have owned about every grill out there and nothing compares to the ease of use and taste of the food cooked on the egg, just my .02
 

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In a word, yes. When it comes to grills, I have owned about every grill out there and nothing compares to the ease of use and taste of the food cooked on the egg, just my .02
I love mine. If you like baby back ribs, try my method and rubb recipe...it's in the cookbook!
 

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You are going to like that XL, I have the xl and the l and never run out of room when cooking. :good2:
I rarely run out of room with my large, because I can always use tiers when smoking or bbqing, but when it comes to turkeys... Well, now I have room for two spatchcocked large turkeys. It'll also be nice not needing to cut up ribs and cook in tiers -- easier to spritz, etc...

As for why a Big Green Egg -- lots of reasons. It does everything well. Good offsets may work better for bbq, and dedicated pizza ovens may work better for pizzas, but eggs work well for everything. It also allows me to use the grill throughout the winter up here in Wisconsin.

If you're interested in kamado cooking, also look at Kamado Joe, Primo, and Vision. I prefer the egg (well, it's green, duh!), but there are other brands out there that work well. I'm pretty sure Big Green Egg, Kamado Joe and Komodo Kamado have the best warranties (lifetime to the original owner), but Primo and Vision are decent. Komodo Kamado brand is the bomb, but I didn't want to spend that much.
 

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If you're going to do burgers or dogs on one of those, how long does it take to set it up and get the fire going? Is it a lot less "convenient" than a gas grill?
 

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If you're going to do burgers or dogs on one of those, how long does it take to set it up and get the fire going? Is it a lot less "convenient" than a gas grill?
I agree it is less convenient but when it comes to the taste of the food, no comparison
 

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I love mine. If you like baby back ribs, try my method and rubb recipe...it's in the cookbook!
I will have to look that up, we love good ribs:thumbup1gif:
 

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If you're going to do burgers or dogs on one of those, how long does it take to set it up and get the fire going? Is it a lot less "convenient" than a gas grill?
Convenience is relative to what you're cooking. It's the same convenience as a Weber/charcoal grill (but don't use any lighter fluid). Yeah, burgers and dogs are faster on a gas grill, but I'm mostly cooking butts, ribs, chili, briskets, chicken or turkey. Stuff that has to be prepped a bit while the grill/smoker is getting warmed up.

I'll also smoke up some chipotles or trout/salmon at (180-200) now and then. Burgers and dogs do ok on gas grills, but most anything else needs special accommodations to the gas grill to do what a kamado does (like adding a decent amount of smoke to the cook). Then the convenient grill is the kamado, rather than the gas grill.

Hey, I've had great food off of gassers and pellet poopers (I also have a Traeger...). I just prefer a kamado for my grilling gear. Heck, why not have a gasser and a kamado! The more grills the better!
 

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I will have to look that up, we love good ribs:thumbup1gif:
Cool! Have you ever cooked a brisket? Brisket is hard for me, but I have finally found a way that works. Do you have any secrets you would like to share?

I went to an Eggfest at "Everything BBQ" and ate some excellent brisket. A lady named Molly Shark was cooking; she said she covered her brisket in sugar overnight in the frige (in a plastic bag), scraped the sugar off just before cooking and covered it with a good dry rubb and then cooked it on the egg, until it got to 195 degrees. I hate a sweet tasting brisket, and remarkably enough, the sugar adds mainly a crust and very little sweetness. Best advice; buy a Prime grade brisket if you can get it, or at the very least a Choice grade.
 

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Hey, I've had great food off of gassers and pellet poopers (I also have a Traeger...). I just prefer a kamado for my grilling gear. Heck, why not have a gasser and a kamado! The more grills the better!
Couldn't agree more! :bigthumb:

If I get a BGE (which I'm kind of leaning towards), I'll keep my gas grill. I like it and I use it quite a bit. It's a 5 burner and when I smoke on it, I only use the two left burners and put a smoker box directly on the burner. I put my ribs on the right side and keep the temp somewhere in the 250-350 range (try to target 300 as much as possible). I've used everything from home shredded apple to store bought bags of wood chips to Traeger pellets (even though I don't have a Traeger). Overall, I get pretty good results from it!. To keep the temp constant, it does take more baby sitting than I'd like though.

I would like to take my smoking to the next level though and I think the BGE is probably the way to go.

Does the BGE have a clean out tray for the ashes now? That was one thing that I didn't like about it compared to some other brands is that it looked like kind of a pain to clean it out.
 

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Cool! Have you ever cooked a brisket? Brisket is hard for me, but I have finally found a way that works. Do you have any secrets you would like to share?

I went to an Eggfest at "Everything BBQ" and ate some excellent brisket. A lady named Molly Shark was cooking; she said she covered her brisket in sugar overnight in the frige (in a plastic bag), scraped the sugar off just before cooking and covered it with a good dry rubb and then cooked it on the egg, until it got to 195 degrees. I hate a sweet tasting brisket, and remarkably enough, the sugar adds mainly a crust and very little sweetness. Best advice; buy a Prime grade brisket if you can get it, or at the very least a Choice grade.
Ahaha -- Yes, I make brisket now and then. I posted my method here earlier this year, and it was on a post for YOU asking about brisket secrets!!! No secrets here, but here's a cut-and-paste from your post from February:

I usually smoke on my kamado, but results should be similar.

1. Yep, try to buy prime or choice. Also try to get the whole brisket (packer), flat and point.

2. I trim all of the hard fat, and try to leave about 1/4 inch of fat remaining. Olive oil and salt, and then add a coffee based rub. (Lanes Ancho Espresso, or Dizzy Pig Red Eye Express). I do this only about 2 hours before smoking.

3. Get my smoker going to 230/240F, using lump charcoal, and add about 4 chunks of hickory. Set up for indirect. Put a drip pan underneath grill grid, and pour 2 bottles of favorite beer into the pan. Put brisket on grid.

4a. If I used a prime or choice cut and have time, I just leave the brisket alone until 205F internal temp. Thermometer probe should insert into meat like butter. This could be 12 to... 20 hours. Internal temp is your guide.
4b. If I'm given the meat and don't know what grade it is, or if it's only the flat cut, or if it's grass fed beef, I check the temp after 5 hours (it should be in the plateau around then). I pull it at 160F. Heavy foil it, and pour 1 can of beef broth inside the foil. Wrap and return to smoker. Remove when 205F internal temp.

5. If broth was used, carefully pour out the broth from the foil, and rewrap. If no broth/foil was used, wrap in heavy foil. Let sit for at least an hour, wrapped in foil and a couple towels, and place in a room temp cooler (a.k.a faux cambro).

6. Remove from cooler -- the cambro will keep it hot for about 5 hours. Remove point from flat (there is a fat line separating the two), and slice against the grain -- pencil thin. Note that the point and flat have a different grain direction. When it comes to the point, you can also remove it before the cambro step, cube and sauce it up, and return it to the smoker for another hour or so. Makes great burnt ends.

7. Serve.
 

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Couldn't agree more! :bigthumb:

If I get a BGE (which I'm kind of leaning towards), I'll keep my gas grill. I like it and I use it quite a bit. It's a 5 burner and when I smoke on it, I only use the two left burners and put a smoker box directly on the burner. I put my ribs on the right side and keep the temp somewhere in the 250-350 range (try to target 300 as much as possible). I've used everything from home shredded apple to store bought bags of wood chips to Traeger pellets (even though I don't have a Traeger). Overall, I get pretty good results from it!. To keep the temp constant, it does take more baby sitting than I'd like though.

I would like to take my smoking to the next level though and I think the BGE is probably the way to go.

Does the BGE have a clean out tray for the ashes now? That was one thing that I didn't like about it compared to some other brands is that it looked like kind of a pain to clean it out.
No clean out tray. I have a brother in-law who has a kamado with a clean out tray (he won a Snap On Tools kamado (that just doesn't sound right, does it...)), and it can be a bit of a pain. The ash doesn't always aim for the tray, so you need to take it all out and apart anyway. I just use the ash tool and pull the ashes out. It's not really an issue. What's more of an issue is removing ash from the Traeger.
 

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Dang!!! Now I'm hungry for brisket!
 

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Ahaha -- Yes, I make brisket now and then. I posted my method here earlier this year, and it was on a post for YOU asking about brisket secrets!!! No secrets here, but here's a cut-and-paste from your post from February:

I usually smoke on my kamado, but results should be similar.

1. Yep, try to buy prime or choice. Also try to get the whole brisket (packer), flat and point.

2. I trim all of the hard fat, and try to leave about 1/4 inch of fat remaining. Olive oil and salt, and then add a coffee based rub. (Lanes Ancho Espresso, or Dizzy Pig Red Eye Express). I do this only about 2 hours before smoking.

3. Get my smoker going to 230/240F, using lump charcoal, and add about 4 chunks of hickory. Set up for indirect. Put a drip pan underneath grill grid, and pour 2 bottles of favorite beer into the pan. Put brisket on grid.

4a. If I used a prime or choice cut and have time, I just leave the brisket alone until 205F internal temp. Thermometer probe should insert into meat like butter. This could be 12 to... 20 hours. Internal temp is your guide.
4b. If I'm given the meat and don't know what grade it is, or if it's only the flat cut, or if it's grass fed beef, I check the temp after 5 hours (it should be in the plateau around then). I pull it at 160F. Heavy foil it, and pour 1 can of beef broth inside the foil. Wrap and return to smoker. Remove when 205F internal temp.

5. If broth was used, carefully pour out the broth from the foil, and rewrap. If no broth/foil was used, wrap in heavy foil. Let sit for at least an hour, wrapped in foil and a couple towels, and place in a room temp cooler (a.k.a faux cambro).

6. Remove from cooler -- the cambro will keep it hot for about 5 hours. Remove point from flat (there is a fat line separating the two), and slice against the grain -- pencil thin. Note that the point and flat have a different grain direction. When it comes to the point, you can also remove it before the cambro step, cube and sauce it up, and return it to the smoker for another hour or so. Makes great burnt ends.

7. Serve.
My apologies. My memory ain't what it used to be; besides my memory ain't what it used to be. I'm going to copy this, print it out and try it soon.
 

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My apologies. My memory ain't what it used to be; besides my memory ain't what it used to be. I'm going to copy this, print it out and try it soon.
Oh, believe me, I've forgotten more than I care to admit in recent years. Happy grilling!
 
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