Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Would anyone out there with real LP 2 cylinder pistons care to weigh in on these?

If you have some LP pistons could you post a pic please?

These came out of the 70 and are too messed up to re-use?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
I'm beginning to think these are gas pistons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Spoke/typed too soon.

I'm beginning to think these are gas pistons.
Based on info from a source who has been selling parts for many years, and when GEP was still known as such, was told the pistons shown are true aftermarket LP pistons.

I still have not found out what differences ,if any, there might be with John Deere LP pistons.

My source said to measure from the top of the piston to the center of the wrist pin.
A measurement of 4 5/8" is an LP. 4 3/8" would be gas. Was told there's about a 3 HP difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,160 Posts
I would think LP would require higher compression...or at least be able to take advantage of running a higher compression piston?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Your thinking is correct. LP requires higher compression. The pistons shown are slightly longer than the gas pistons.

If I had the setup to do it, I'd consider trying to make my own. But then again, it might end up costing more time and money than it's worth. The only reason I even thought of it, is because there are other 2cylinder tractors that'll probably need pistons too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Stop the car.....hold the presses!

Something isn't quite right about what my source said in regard to the measurement of LP pistons.

When I measured the other night, there wasn't sufficient light and did not have a proper measuring tool handy.

So, yesterday I remeasured the distance from the top edge of the pistons to the center of the wrist pin. Even had a friend who's a well known machinist to take a look. Instead of 4 5/8", the measurement is 4 3/4". Looks like I better call my source and ask him about this. It's only 1/8" difference, but when dealing with engines, this is crucial.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top