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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I bought a new property this year and a new 1025r to go with it. I’m looking for the best and/or most economical way to remove snow. I want to add that I’m in the Midwest and we may get one or two big snows a season. My driveway is about 150 yards long and paved in asphalt.


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Not sure if it will work for your situation but I use Edge Tamers for :snow: plowing my concrete and gravel driveway.
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A plow is the best and fastest. I have a 1025r and just purchased a CTA loader mounted 66” plow. I had a x728 before this with JD 54” 4 way plow and what I didn’t like about it besides being too narrow is all the low hanging attachment parts that froze up and could hang up if you were trying to pile snow up.

Blowers can be worthless in heavy wet snow. Two of my neighbors were unable to use their snowthrowers in storms last year that started out as rain then added 12” of heavy wet stuff on top. I had no trouble plowing myself and them out with my little plow.
 

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I have been plowing my drive and 2 of the neighbors drive with just the bucket. No edge tamers. We like to have bare asphalt. The edge tamers are a great product but I don't have a need for them. Part of my drive is gravel and if it is to soft then I wont plow it or i just hold the bucket up a few inches. If our all wheel drive car or 4x4 truck can't make it thru a few inches of snow on top of gravel then we need to stay home! Lol I do the same for the grass areas too. I just keep the bucket up.


This year I bought a 6ft plow for a John Deere from a guy and my Titan plate that I am going to attach it to will be here Monday. I wanted to be able to speed up my plowing but not give up the availability to stack the snow up high. With the plow I will be able to do that and still keep the asphalt as bare as possible.

Good luck!
 

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I have a 54 blower and a 54 blade. I've found there are some snows more suited to the blade (light and/or wet) and some are more suited to the blower (heavy, dry, drifted). And some snows you really need both at different points in the cleanup. I modified my hydraulics to make switching between the two implements very fast. Please see this post for details.

If you are trying to choose between the blower and the blade, remember that you can get both for an incremental cost of just the blade, which really isn't that expensive. They might even throw in the blade if you buy everything else. The quick hitch works with either one, and you have to buy it even if you'll only have one. The blade is also handy for landscaping. With the blade locked, I've used it for leveling areas and removing 4-5 inches of dirt in an area I was going to place rock landscaping. Don't forget a synthetic edge for the blade and synthetic shoes for the blower if you want to protect your driveway surface.

After 30 years of using a blade for snow removal, I'm pretty good at it. But using the snow blower is exhilarating. Bringing the engine up to WOT and diving into a big snow bank, watching the rooster tail of snow shooting out of the blower. I don't even mind when the wind shifts and I end up wearing the rooster tail. Photo here.
 

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Blowers can be worthless in heavy wet snow. Two of my neighbors were unable to use their snowthrowers in storms last year that started out as rain then added 12” of heavy wet stuff on top. I had no trouble plowing myself and them out with my little plow.
I have a hard time with that one! I have used many different snow blowers (push, self propelled push, Gravely "Dog Eater", single and 2 stage) in every kind of snow this area can produce and none of the blowers failed to clear snow off dirt, gravel or pavement. One HAS TO learn how each snow blower works in each kind of snow condition. Sometimes it's only 1/4 of a pass at a time and fast travel and sometimes it's full width and slow travel, etc. Give up on a blower here in the 21st Century...? I don't think so, it's just such a waste of money!

The BEST blower I've had/used in the last 60 years is the "primitive but simple" single stage 42" on my GX335. From 4" of wet gray slush to 2+ feet of layered rain/sleet/snow/sleet/ice... It took it all. Used to "try" to clear parking lot and roads where I worked with a JD310A loader, long messy going until we put a modified Fisher plow on the bucket and the snow went like it was supposed to. My 1026r/54"plow/wings/rubber edge sits quietly on the sidelines in bigger snows. Just too much backing and banging on a diagonal to get the entire driveway pushed back. Blower puts it back plenty far with very little maneuvering or backing up. Needless to say the town plow berm at driveway's end will slow down a blower, but it will dispose of it nicely.

Just get out there with them blowers and "Learn, Grasshoppers"!:laugh:

I only wish JD would make a 54 single stage for SCUTs, I'd be at the dealer tomorrow for one!
 

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I think a front mounted snowblower is the way to go with small tractors. I have had my 1026/54” blower since 2011. I have moved all types of snow with it. The only time it plugged up is when I moved a 6’ pile the town plow left behind because the truck couldn’t push it any farther.

Plows are great if you have somewhere to push the snow to. I find when using a plow or loader you end up plowing a larger area and end up with some lawn damage as you need to push the snow back off the driveway.
 

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I have a hard time with that one! I have used many different snow blowers (push, self propelled push, Gravely "Dog Eater", single and 2 stage) in every kind of snow this area can produce and none of the blowers failed to clear snow off dirt, gravel or pavement. One HAS TO learn how each snow blower works in each kind of snow condition. Sometimes it's only 1/4 of a pass at a time and fast travel and sometimes it's full width and slow travel, etc. Give up on a blower here in the 21st Century...? I don't think so, it's just such a waste of money!

The BEST blower I've had/used in the last 60 years is the "primitive but simple" single stage 42" on my GX335. From 4" of wet gray slush to 2+ feet of layered rain/sleet/snow/sleet/ice... It took it all. Used to "try" to clear parking lot and roads where I worked with a JD310A loader, long messy going until we put a modified Fisher plow on the bucket and the snow went like it was supposed to. My 1026r/54"plow/wings/rubber edge sits quietly on the sidelines in bigger snows. Just too much backing and banging on a diagonal to get the entire driveway pushed back. Blower puts it back plenty far with very little maneuvering or backing up. Needless to say the town plow berm at driveway's end will slow down a blower, but it will dispose of it nicely.

Just get out there with them blowers and "Learn, Grasshoppers"!:laugh:

I only wish JD would make a 54 single stage for SCUTs, I'd be at the dealer tomorrow for one!
I have a 54" front mount snow blower and I can tell you from experience, in 4" of wet heavy snow, don't waste your time putting it on, since it blocks up more than not. Now, if you have enough snow to keep the blower full of snow, then it won't block up.
In my part of the country, a snow blower is an expensive novelty. A front mount blade is by far the single best snow removal tool in most snows.

I have a front mount blade, front mount snow blower and front mount broom. I use the broom most of the time. I have used the snow blower twice since 2013 and one of them I could have easily used the front mount blade.

IMO, the most economical, single snow removal tool, you cannot beat a front mount blade, rear ballast and tire chains if you plow a hill.
 

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I have been using both since 1995 and the blower gets 90-95% of the use. When I only had the 445, the blower was used exclusively and the plow sat idle, just was not worth the effort to change over. Now with the two tractors, the 1026R gets the blower and the 445 gets the plow. Again, some winters the 445 is never used. As for plugging the chute, I just use chute shovel my dealer sold for the Arins line. The blockages mostly happen when I come to the end of the run and the slush is no longer being pushed out, again this is mostly along the road where the salt has melted the crap. I find it easier to unplug the chute rather than going back to the barn and cranking the 445 up and getting dressed for the cab less work. It does get cold with out a cab.
 

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I live in a lake effect snow area and have all asphalt and concrete surfaces.

I have used a front blower with a rear blade for many years. If the OP doesn’t get that much snow, I’d use a front blade and maybe at some point add a rear blower for the occasional bigger snows and drifts.
 

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I have a hard time with that one! I have used many different snow blowers (push, self propelled push, Gravely "Dog Eater", single and 2 stage) in every kind of snow this area can produce and none of the blowers failed to clear snow off dirt, gravel or pavement. One HAS TO learn how each snow blower works in each kind of snow condition. Sometimes it's only 1/4 of a pass at a time and fast travel and sometimes it's full width and slow travel, etc. Give up on a blower here in the 21st Century...? I don't think so, it's just such a waste of money!
I pretty much agree with you but... last winter we had a few snowfalls of around 5-6 inches of what can best be described as one big slushie. Our neighbor has a 28" walk-behind and he was having a heck of a time. The snow coming out of the chute was barely clearing his tires.

I have a 2720 with the 54" blower on the front and a 5-foot blade on the rear and I was able to blow the slush out of the way but found that the rear blade actually worked better. I ended up clearing the neighbors driveway with the rear blade.

The year before that we had 26" with 40+ drifts and the other neighbor with a 1-series and a loader was unable to do anything. I mean, he could get that first bucket full of snow out of the garage but he couldn't take it anywhere because it was impossible to push and the tractor wasn't going anywhere in 26 inches of snow. So it took the snowblower to clear a path. Now... granted waiting until the snow was over was the fatal mistake and had they plowed with the storm all day they could have kept it clear. For anyone that wants to just use a plow you have to plow with the storm during heavy snow falls. With a blower you can pretty much just wait till it is over and clear it once.

This goes back to the blade vs. blower argument. Here in Central PA you really need both. I use the rear blade for all the light snows and for general clean up but when we get those big Snowpocalypse events it's blower time.
 
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I have a 54" front mount snow blower and I can tell you from experience, in 4" of wet heavy snow, don't waste your time putting it on, since it blocks up more than not. Now, if you have enough snow to keep the blower full of snow, then it won't block up.
In my part of the country, a snow blower is an expensive novelty. A front mount blade is by far the single best snow removal tool in most snows.
Do you per chance still have the plastic (err.. umm... poly) impeller? I'm in Central PA also and with the poly impeller the performance of my 54" blower was bad. Much worse than my 25 year old MTD 33" walk-behind. But I changed the impeller over to the steel one and it is now a snow throwing monster. I can throw that watery slush that gets on the side of the road without any problem. And (knock on wood) in the 4 years I've been using it so far I have never had a single clog.

My winter arsenal consists of the 54" blower on the front and a 5-foot blade on the back.
 

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I went through that decision process last fall. It's not easy because there are several very different options, pushing or blowing. They all have advantages and disadvantages and cost considerations. In my case, we get a number of fairly small snows each year, but get a few whoppers as well. I went with a tractor mounted blade for my gravel driveway. A big part of my decision was that this is for a lake home so I don't have to get up and do snow removal before going to work in the morning. I may have gone a different direction if I had to get to work in the morning.

I've put together the attached spreadsheet that may help in your decision making process. One man's opinions.

Roger J.
 

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My 3038E with tires loaded and 7’ Landpride backblade plows through everything Michigan has thrown at my 600’ driveway since 2009. I wait till it the snowstorm ends and then I back it out of the barn with the plow down and push it nonstop all the way to the road. Loader with Edge Tamers and 7’ blade works well at least at my place. :plowsnow:
 

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I clear snow from a 750 foot long driveway, plus a parking area that measures roughly 60 feet by 60 feet

Since 1987, when I started with a 318 and single stage blower, I then swapped the single stage blower for a two stage. One thing I learned was when we had a wet snow, was to wait overnight when the moisture in the snow would drop down through the snow column, and then I was blowing dry snow. I then moved up to a 420 with a two stage blower, and that handled the snow much better. I now have a 955 with the two stage blower. Another thing I learned was to rub paraffin wax on the inside of the chute at the beginning of the season.

With the 420, I replaced the grill with a solid panel to keep the hot air off the motor from heating the back side of the blower and chute.

The problem I had with the single stage blower was that in the parking area, I was moving the same snow over and over, as I could not get much lift to get horizontal distance away from the cleared path.

Dave
 

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Hard to handle light 1"/2" fluffy snow: Turn deflector down and blow the snow alongside the machine. Do the same with the next row until you have enough snow to heave it full distance.

Slop/wet snow: Wide Open Throttle!!! Ground speed fast enough to assure snow clears the chute. I personally don't use wax,
Crisco, Pam or other chute lubes any longer. I simply soak the snow handling areas of the blower and plow with WD-40 with a sprayer. It keeps the snow from sticking until the blower/plow reaches the temperature of the snow and it rolls off or blows out. Reapply as needed when conditions change and snow starts sticking again. Like grass clippings under a mower deck, some snow will eventually stick to some areas of snow equipment no matter what...

AIM that exhaust AWAY from plows and blowers. Nothing kills snow joy like a warm plow or blower! If you store your stuff in a heated environment don't roll right out and start blowing/plowing... allow the equipment to drop to ambient temperature before encountering the snow. Running the blower for 5+ minutes or so will help cool the components...

I suggest anyone with one of those nasty unwanted 54" blowers for a 1XXX series contact me. I might even pay a nominal sum for it if the upstop, drive shaft and drive adapter are included. I already have the quick hitch thank you. I'll even lift it off your trailer or pickup with my loader!!!:laugh::mocking:
 

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For an asphalt drive, it's hard to beat a snowthrower. The problem with a plow is that you have to push the first snow back enough from the drive so that you have room for the next snowfall. Never an issue with a snowthrower.

I used a 46" single stage for years with my 425 and loved it but when I got my 1025R I got a good deal on a 47 2-stage so I decided to switch. We'll see how it does - probably in the next 4-6 weeks :(
 

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Another thing I learned was to rub paraffin wax on the inside of the chute at the beginning of the season.

Thanks for mentioning that, I also spray silicone all over the inside of the housing and on the augers.:thumbup1gif:
 

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Not quite what OP is asking but here is what I do.

I have owned rural property with over 900ft drive way for about 30 years.

I have always paid to have it plowed by someone with a truck and snowplow.

Cost has ranged from a high of $40/plow job. Currently I pay $35/plow.
I'm sure that an 150ft drive would be less.

I have agreement with plow co. that if I get under 2-3 inches of snow don't bother.
That little snow gets packed and it does not effect getting in or out.
Also I have always told them that I didn't need to be plowed right away, I could wait up to 18 hrs after snow ends.

Getting out of drive rather than getting in is always easier when there is snow.

My winter plow bill is usually around $200-$300.

I'm retired and have the time but I have no interest in plowing snow.
When I was working NO way I'd spend my time plowing snow at 4 in the morning or at night when I got home from my typical 10 hour workday.
 

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I live in a lake effect snow area and have all asphalt and concrete surfaces.

I have used a front blower with a rear blade for many years. If the OP doesn’t get that much snow, I’d use a front blade and maybe at some point add a rear blower for the occasional bigger snows and drifts.
Yep you get the snow, and you will get it with the lake being warm this year.:munch:
 
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