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Tired of breaking my back and inspired by other members, I'm working on a post hole digger stand. I used a rack off of my old Chevy for a start of stand. I ground as much paint and rust as I could where I needed to weld. I would like you more experienced welder to critique my welds. Please be gentle, like I said before, I'm still a practicing. I still need to build legs for the 3pt. Arms.
 

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Did the stand not collapse?? :dunno:

Then the welds were GREAT!!:bigthumb:

My PHD is laying in the weeds,,, :dunno:
 

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Looking good Brian, your getting the hand of it! :thumbup1gif:
 

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Yup, looking good. You're already light years ahead of the Chinese welders and the beads you find on HF stuff. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Looks to me like those welds should hold easily with what you are asking from them. The penetration level looks right on cause the edge appears flat and the heat effected zone looks even as well. It looks like you should have cleaned the surface a bit better or might beed to add more flow to your shielding gas due to the pin holes (porosity) scattered about. An ever so slight breeze can also cause this so shut doors, turn off or redirect fans etc when striking an arc.

On your vertical weld it looks like you stopped and started a bunch, maybe it was burning thru? Always travel down vertically. When going up, heat rises, increases a ton, and you'll rip right thru.

The stand looks great though. Thats all I got.

Jim


Sent from my iPhone 6 using Tapatalk
 

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On the next project,,, consider minimizing the inches of weld,,,

Sometimes you only need one inch out of ten inches of joint,,,, sometimes three inches,,,, etc,,,

Each inch of weld costs $$$,,, and each inch of weld costs thermal distortion... :hide:

Plus,,,, with less weld,,, your expertootolage really starts to show!! :bigthumb:

(I got that word out of an Eddie Murphy movie,,,,:laugh:)
 

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Did you put them welds on with a sling-shot from 30 yards out?
Just kiddin'........not so awful bad for someone just learning. It's an art, and not everyone can be a Rembrandt from right outta' the box.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the input. For some reason, the wire is tangles on the spool. That caused some of the stopping and starting. I shut the door, but didn't think about the fan. I could have used less welds, but need the practice.

About the spool of wire. Are some brands worse than others on the way they wrap the wire on the spool? I bought the wire from Indiana Oxygen. In the begining I thought the welder had a problem but just realized with this project that the wire is wrapped in a way that it gets caught and caused some pauses.
 

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Thanks for the input. For some reason, the wire is tangles on the spool. That caused some of the stopping and starting. I shut the door, but didn't think about the fan. I could have used less welds, but need the practice.

About the spool of wire. Are some brands worse than others on the way they wrap the wire on the spool? I bought the wire from Indiana Oxygen. In the begining I thought the welder had a problem but just realized with this project that the wire is wrapped in a way that it gets caught and caused some pauses.
Wire should pull from below the spool, and you should have enough drag so it doesn't loosen but not so much it's hard to pull. The drive roll tension should be high enough that you can push a curl in the wire, but not high enough to distort it.

Some wire will be on the high side of nominal, and some will be thinner. You should test the drag and tension whenever you switch out spools.

Full seam welding is often done for rust prevention. It has nothing to do with needed strength.

Welding vertical UP makes stronger welds. You need to slow your feed rate down around 10% to do vert up because the puddle sags, not because the material above it has preheated so much. The idea is to have the puddle cool below the fluid point quickly as you're building the weld above it.

Vert down is an inferior joint technique, but can be "good enough" much of the time due to our tendancy to over-weld to begin with.
 
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