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Discussion Starter #1
I rebuilt the axle housings on my 1020 last week. I put in all new bearings and seals and cleaned all the old nasty grease out of the inside. Reassembled everything and mounted them back up. The more and more I think about it, I feel I did not set the preload on the bearings correctly. In the manual it states to "adjust the axle bearings by first measuring the drag torque with the planet pinion assembled in place....this value should not exceed 50 in-lbs" then with new bearings to "tighten the pinion retaining washer screw so that the total torque measured is within 90-140 in-lbs".

Im confused by this and it has me double thinking if I did it incorrectly. I reassembled everything with the axle flange sitting on the floor, then tightened the retaining bolt to about 125 in-lbs. I assumed torque is torque, but reading this drag torque has me confused. The axle has little to no free play that I can feel, but the retaining bolt didn't feel tight at all with the 125 in-lbs.

Anybody know more on this subject? I really don't want to mess up the new bearings by not having the correct preload on them. The tractor isn't back in service yet as I am still doing other work to it, so I could easily take the tire off and pull the housing to redo it. I just need to know the correct way.

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As I understand it, drag torque is the force needed to turn the wheel... NOT the axle nut. Hence "Drag" torque. The lock plate secures the nut from turning and loosening.
 

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I agree with Hosspuller.
Drag torque is the torque to turn the axle assembly and keep it rotating.
You need a dial type inch torque wrench. Watch the dial as the axle is being rotated.
If the torque value is too low, tighten the special bolt a little more, then check drag torque again.
If it take too much torque to get the axle rotating, you have the bearings too tight.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Alright. Looks like thats what I will do then. I'll pull the axles again to redo them correctly. Should be easy this time pulling them though now that everything is cleaned up. Im curious if a normal click type torque wrench would work though? I'm really not looking to spend another $150 for a tool that I'll use once.
 

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A click type torque wrench will only signal over torque... as it clicks when you reach a settting. You're measuring INCH pounds … a low torque. A beam type wrench is cheap and will read the drag torque as you turn the gear. Just put a marker on the scale where you don't want exceed to make it easy to read.
 

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Check to see if your local auto parts store has a tool rental program. My local Advance Auto will rent tools for what they cost and when you bring them back you get all of your money back.


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You are correct, an inch pound torque wrench gets little use. I have used mine more on scope rings and bases, than tractors.
That said, I picked up mine off eBay real cheap. I am guessing the seller rarely used it so set it off to eBay.
I have a Snap On dial type. It's 3/8" drive, I keep a 3/8" to 1/4" drive adapter on it 90% of the time.
 
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