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I'm thinking of installing a backup camera on one of my tractors. Seems my neck can no longer stand looking back when using the rear blade or the dirt scoop, old age is setting in I guess. Have any of you tried this?
 

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I'm thinking of installing a backup camera on one of my tractors. Seems my neck can no longer stand looking back when using the rear blade or the dirt scoop, old age is setting in I guess. Have any of you tried this?
Yes and took it off. Found the distorted view could not be trusted for me to use it. Sun had to be just right to see the screen I even shaded it. Maybe in a Cab no reflective light it will?? After I removed mine and put it on my truck for Wal-Mart people walking behind me. I used 2 - 3" x 7" bolt on mirrors to see the hitch and behind me. Then I only have to part way turn to see the hitch or just look up and see behind me thru the other one. My neck is also bad you learn to drive and operate with brail at times I can still see my blade to know it is back there working. You will just find you don't look much when not needed. I look to drive backward near things only
 

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Yes and took it off. Found the distorted view could not be trusted for me to use it. Sun had to be just right to see the screen I even shaded it. Maybe in a Cab no reflective light it will?? After I removed mine and put it on my truck for Wal-Mart people walking behind me. I used 2 - 3" x 7" bolt on mirrors to see the hitch and behind me. Then I only have to part way turn to see the hitch or just look up and see behind me thru the other one. My neck is also bad you learn to drive and operate with brail at times I can still see my blade to know it is back there working. You will just find you don't look much when not needed. I look to drive backward near things only
Thank you for the reply. I understand what you wrote about sun washing out the screen. I was thinking mirrors but, it would be difficult to install on a 750 tractor, then is the problem of shake in viewing them. Do you have a lot of shake in the mirror?
Getting old is not easy....:laugh:
 

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I have the cab with outside mirrors on both sides. Absolutely necessary. The mirrors allow me to see what is necessary behind me. I rarely turn around to see behind me any more.

Dave
 

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My Mirrors are solid mount and don't shake. May shake a little on a bad road but then so would the camera. You have to get used to mirrors.
 

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Been looking to put a 4 camera wireless system on my tractor, 9" monitor.

One on front bumper for loader bucket/forks view, one on top of cab front view, one on back of cab (rearview) and basically
extra for future use.

Lots of systems out there, very spotty reviews on dependability.

Have yet to find what I would call a quality system.
 

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Haven't found the backup camera to be a suitable substitute for turning around and looking. Tried an inexpensive one on my 855 for about an hour before removing it. I had the camera and monitor mounted steady enough but the field of view didn't give me proper depth perception. One problem is they all have a wide field of view. If you could find one with a normal field of view and connect it to a 12" or larger monitor it might work okay.

I recently put a backup camera and 7" monitor in my truck also. The only time I use it is for hooking up the trailer in the shade.
 

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I'm thinking of installing a backup camera on one of my tractors. Seems my neck can no longer stand looking back when using the rear blade or the dirt scoop, old age is setting in I guess. Have any of you tried this?
Yes and I LOVE it......But I also have a cab and will tell you I use the camera 99% of the time when its dark out and the rear mirrors when it's light.

If you have a cab, you will love it in my opinion as long as you get a good camera with a clear resolution. I used a wireless one and it's been excellent.
 

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Yes and I LOVE it......But I also have a cab and will tell you I use the camera 99% of the time when its dark out and the rear mirrors when it's light.

If you have a cab, you will love it in my opinion as long as you get a good camera with a clear resolution. I used a wireless one and it's been excellent.
When the sun went down my camera worked great too but when the sun was up I could not see the monitor very well. At dusk and night time it worked great but I plow most snow in daylight so it did not help me much. I made a 6 inch shade screen over it and the sun still knocked out the screen. 100_0210.JPG 100_0213.JPG 100_0217.JPG I tried everything to make it work in sunlight. I think a enclosed cab with the monitor mounted at the top of the cab out of the sun would help a lot. Boy at 70+ hours my tractor was nice and shinny still and no cab! I think it is time to give it a bath 2 years later!
 

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Been looking to put a 4 camera wireless system on my tractor, 9" monitor.

One on front bumper for loader bucket/forks view, one on top of cab front view, one on back of cab (rearview) and basically
extra for future use.

Lots of systems out there, very spotty reviews on dependability.

Have yet to find what I would call a quality system.
It also depend whether you want to have a wired or wireless system. I see no need to run the coax for each camera as well as the wireless units I have function. There are a bunch of "low cost" systems out there which are low quality. I found several quality systems after extensive looking.

In one test of the system I am using, I was able to take the camera almost 100 feet from the monitor and the picture quality and signal were great. So, for someone who wants a camera on the rear of a trailer, etc. this system works fine. Plus my camera is rated for "extremely wet" operating environments and it has been put to the test and I have had no failures. I think it is Ip68 for the cameras.

How do you plan to "display" these multiple images, in a quad form or on demand per camera? I would suggest on demand or the image size isn't as helpful as it can be.

Also, having used a camera for well over a year for plowing, rear mowing, etc. I have trouble seeing the benefit of a camera on the roof looking forward which basically shares the same view as the operator. It's hard to imagine what might be different about that perspective which would actually be helpful. I do run forward facing camera's (two of them) when plowing snow so if anyone ever claimed I hit a garage door or damaged something, I have recorded images of all the plowing in files by date on the computer. But that camera use is more about the image being reproduced for broadcast or viewing by others, verses the vehicle camera for operator benefit.

For the "Go Pro" camera's, I have one left and one on the right. One thing to keep in mind about those type of camera placements is if you are mounting them inside the cab, you need to place them where the glass is cleared by the wiper, or every image you have on file is looking through a "water spot" covered windshield view as the camera mount on the right was just below the front wiper's reach. Doesn't sound like a big deal but having water spots all over the camera image diminishes the viewing enjoyment of the plowing activity.

Only once in over 200 hours of plowing snow have I had to stop and wipe off the camera lens. I backed into a pine tree branch covered with snow and it buried the monitor on top of the cab. Once I wiped away the small lens, everything was back to normal. The system camera is also surprisingly tolerant of temps without any fogging, etc.

Another area where the camera is incredibly helpful is when driving or backing into a building during the bright daylight. The image in the camera is far better than what you can see in the mirrors and it's even superior to what you can see looking yourself, as the system adjusts the light very efficiently. It looks like the image inside the building it lit its so clear and everything visible. Actually, its pretty amazing the image you can see with or without extra lights, etc.

Use Portable cameras to test permanent camera mounting locations and views.
The Go Pro camera's are actually very helpful in determining your permanent cab monitor camera locations. The Go Pro knock off units are cheap, you can get a decent camera with various mounts and a couple of batteries, charger, etc. for around $40 on Amazon. Then, simply mount the temporary mounts in different locations and record the use of your operation. You will quickly see which angles and views are helpful to you and which are not. It's very easy to suction cup the Go Pro camera and then activate it (you can use the blue tooth remote or even your flip phone.....well, maybe smart phone anyways..:laugh::lol:..) and use your tractor. See if the image it records and what you can see is helpful and what you want in your permanent camera mounting locations.

Just always use a couple of zip ties as safety tethers for the camera and mount in case you knock the camera off or it separates from the mount. That way the safety tether will permit the camera to be recovered and used another day. I HIGHLY suggest the low cost Go Pro knock off camera approach for testing the permanent camera locations. You can't watch the Go Pro camera image live unless you have the app on your smart phone, but you can replay the video on your computer, etc to see if the camera location is a good one for your cab camera.

Helpful and Useful Images in the Cab Camera
From extensive use, I find its ideal for easily seeing what's behind you and for backing and attaching to implements, etc. Personally, I could see having a camera on the rear looking right down at the hitch area and also having a camera on the rear which looks out beyond the hitch area. Those are two very helpful and often used perspectives.

It also might be helpful to have a camera out front which shows the bucket angle and surface contact and also for picking up items or lifting things with pallet forks, etc. I can see it either centered on the hood protector or off the corner of the hood protector, etc. That way it can see down directly in front of the tractor where you can't see from the operators seat.

Much of the need depends upon the machine's use. I find it's very handy to watch the rear 3 point mower in the camera with the full rear view and not have to keep turning sideways to see it. You can't really see the mower in the mirrors the way you can with the camera. Also, when you have the loader on and a rear implement, it allows you to keep an eye on the swinging back hoe boom and the loader bucket when backing or positioning into a tight area, without having to keep swiveling the head side to side or front to rear.

I have knocked my monitor around and it has even been dropped on the cement floor several times and it still continues working just fine. I did have a funny thing occur the other day. The first driveway I was plowing has a "S" driveway from the road and also two complete "0" driveway circles, all tied together. Backing when plowing is complex because everything is curved on the driveway.

I started to back and then looked and I was too far to the left. Then I was too far the other way, I thought "What the heck is going on"? Then I noticed in the rear camera monitor that my view had "flipped" and the image in the monitor was backwards to what it actually is. I pushed the control button three times and the image rotated and then was correctly oriented again. The reason I noticed it was I have two different shovels on the rear carry all and I noticed they were switched in location on the image, verses their actual location. I accidentally changed the orientation by bumping the button, it was easy to "fix" but sure tricky to back up when everything is reversed.....:laugh::lol:
 

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This picture is what I see sitting in my seat looking at the Monitor inside my tent building out of the sun. This unit was around $150.00 and you could flip, zoom, wide angle and have up to 4 cameras hooked into it. My biggest issue was not seeing a good enough or large enough image to trust backing up using it. I would have to first check how it really looked and then try to follow it in the monitors small distorted picture which makes it look further away then it is. Once you can feel conferrable with that it will help some. This is the picture of backing into my shop and the blade is really inches from hitting my table. This is what you will see unless you put your face right down at the monitor. My screen was a 7" screen I bought the biggest one I could find. It was the same one and type I had in the Cab of my Water tender to back out of fires. Inside my cab it worked great and why I got one for my tractor. Just was not happy using it when I could only see well once in a while not all the time. My camera was also a water proof one and never needed cleaning. I tried mounting it low at the fuel tank and it was real distorted looking over the top of the blade. Then I mounted it high on the roll bar and that was way better for me. That is how it is mounted for this view. I guess I need to see in real time/size image to use it not to hit stuff. It was OK to look back and see if I was plowing right or still moving snow but near a fence line I had to look at the fence first just to make sure the blade was not to close. It just did not do for me what I wanted one for. Others may love theirs but to me my tractor could do to much damage to use it for accuracy in working the rear blade it was mainly used for just seeing if I was being followed, snow still flowing off the blade. I would like a Go Pro to tape what is going on incase I mess up or someone hits me to look at later. I just need to see with my eyes to feel right using the implements. The picture you get to see is very small if you can deal with that it may work for you. My old eyes don't like to test the image to much so it went on my pickup to see if there was a person out of view from my mirrors behind. In my truck I can pick it up and see a foot from my face if it is clear to back up and then I still use my mirrors and eyes looking back. I would hate to run over some one because I did not see them in my camera or missed it in the small monitor. It is like walking around looking at your camera screen to see for me that is hard to do.
100_0210.JPG 100_0194.JPG View when I had it looking right at my blade. 100_0189.JPG I moved my camera close to take this picture. This is glare from what the sun does this too but worse. 100_0187.JPG Last 2 pictures were taken outside the tent in the sun this is what I was talking about I had a time seeing well.
 

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I just wanted to warn guys with out cabs this is how it turned out for me. At first I was happy and posted that then the sun came out. I did not want someone to think hey thanks and see what I did. I think if you take your camera/phone out and hold it where you may put the monitor and drive around looking at the screen in the sunshine. If you like it and remember you can't move it in this test then buy one. Then you can move it around and see if it is safe to use taking your eyes off the road to look at a screen to drive with.
 

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Thank you for the reply. I understand what you wrote about sun washing out the screen. I was thinking mirrors but, it would be difficult to install on a 750 tractor, then is the problem of shake in viewing them. Do you have a lot of shake in the mirror?
Getting old is not easy....:laugh:
I have four Jeep mirrors on mine, and shake isn't an issue.

Been looking to put a 4 camera wireless system on my tractor, 9" monitor.

One on front bumper for loader bucket/forks view, one on top of cab front view, one on back of cab (rearview) and basically
extra for future use.

Lots of systems out there, very spotty reviews on dependability.

Have yet to find what I would call a quality system.
I did a two camera system consisting of a 9" or 10" flip down monitor hanging from the canopy frame. The cameras are wide angle and normal field of view. All were sourced from Fleabay (big mistake). The wide view camera works as designed, the normal angle only works some of the time. Since my tractor is open station, the sun glare makes the monitor useless. Everything is hardwired. I haven't used it in years; so the only real things that came from my attempt was spending money and fabricating stuff. I still would like a camera setup; but I haven't found anything that looks worth a darn to buy.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thank you for all the replies. I'm undecided as of yet what I'll do, lot to think over. I don't have a cab on this tractor (too many trees along the fence rows). Very good info.
 

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Just like most of you, I started off wanting a rear view camera. Getting old sucks! Too much turning around for my neck. Well, after installing one and enjoying the freedom it gave me, I looked toward my loader and forks. It's damn near impossible to tell where the forks are and if level. I tried a piece of yellow tape on the level indicator for the loader and that did help some, but still had the problem of being too high or low. At the same time, even though I've been at this a while, I tend to go from my bigger 5R tractor to my little 1025R and the "feel" is not the same. I found myself rolling over objects I intend to pick up or dig too deep or not deep enough, etc. etc.

So, being a little bit of a scrooge, I didn't want to spend the money just to see if it would work or not so I tried a few experiments...

1. I started with one of my wifi surveillance cameras at home. It seemed that the whole idea of a bucket cam might work. (Of course this wouldn't work as I have no wifi in the fields or wherever I'm working)

2. Ok, now I moved up to the next level, I had an unused Hero camera that had been modified to provide real time video to my smartphone.Again, got better but battery time was too low.

3. Moving on I decided to try a dash cam I had in my truck. Maybe it was the brand or whatever, but I had a hard time keeping the swiveling camera lens in place. Even good ole duct tape was no help.

** FORGOT TO MENTION: I am attaching the camera using one of the two holes already in the top of the 120R loader bucket on my 2018 1025R **

4. But that got me to thinking, it sure would be nice if I could have an outdoor, high quality, remotely controlled camera. Yeah, I thought and why not a beautiful blonde on my lap while working to wipe the sweat off my brow and hold my beer, while i'm dreaming. I got to talking a joking around with my grandson (18) and he told me I COULD have all that, FREE...well except the blonde. He had a drone that he crashed and tore it all to hell. Well it seems the camera and it's functions worked well. He took that and a little help from youtube videos, converted it to be powered by the tractor battery and enclosed the whole thing in a small aluminum box. Now I had an outdoor, 4k camera that I could rotate the view anyway I wanted, up, down, left, right, zoom in, zoom out...wow! this thing is great. I just mounted a tablet onto the hood with a sun shield around it with it set in deep enough the sun wouldn't sneak in. PLUS as a bonus, he was able to still connect it to his VR Goggles. I tried using them once. Letting them sit on top of my head like a welders helmet them lowering them when I wanted to be able to see really good. It was effective and had a really nice picture, but I felt like those boys on that movie Weird Science, you know where they are making a woman with their computer and sit there with bras strapped to their heads...LOL. A little too much for me.

Any way, the setup works perfect, I got everything I asked for at no charge. Now to look for that blonde. When I get a chance I'll take some pics to show you all. (Of the camera, not the blonde)
 

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Sully - is your wireless system battery powered or is it hooked up to the tractor battery? I'm sure that you have posted a link or description in the past, but could you do it again? <<BigThumb>>

I'm considering some sort of system for the front of my tractor so I can position my tree puller without having to stand up in the operator's station.
 

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Sully - is your wireless system battery powered or is it hooked up to the tractor battery? I'm sure that you have posted a link or description in the past, but could you do it again? <<BigThumb>>

I'm considering some sort of system for the front of my tractor so I can position my tree puller without having to stand up in the operator's station.
Hey Sully, the power for the camera and gimbal are connected to the tractor battery with a quick connect on the wires so if needed, I just unplug one thing and I'm all set. As far as the "wifi", the original drone had a built-in wifi, so no matter where I'm at I don't need a real wifi connection. Basically we took off all the non essential parts of the drone, the parts that are only to make it look like a drone, and used the camera gimbal and the parts that mattered to work it. I still control it like I would as if it were a drone, using the DJI drone android app.
 
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