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I purchased a horizontal metal cutting band saw last week and several 24' sticks of rectangle tubing, angle and bar stock. After I got the saw to cut dead nuts perfect, I have cut one of the sticks down. I held it up on 2 harbor freight roller stands and thought there has to be a better way to handle the length of the metal. I'm thinking of getting a couple of 10' sections of gravity roller conveyors and set them up to feed the metal into the band saw and use the cheap roller stands on the out feed side of the saw, since the pieces of metal will be shorter and manageable. Has anyone done this and if so, how is it working out? I haven't look too hard yet on the conveyors, but I did find one that would fit my needs, I think. Below is photo of the band saw and of the type of conveyor I am thinking of going with. I'm not stuck on any brand of conveyor, but the photo will give you an idea of what I am looking at. I plan on building my own stands for the conveyors. I just want to know if this idea is worth pursuing or not. I don't plan on doing production work, I just want something that will make my tool time more pleasant and easier on the body.
 

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Judging by the pile of steel in that pic, I'd say it's well worth it. Yes the rollers work great for what you are doing.
 

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Get the conveyor! I wish I had space for one.

If I did have the space I'd make the stand for the conveyor big enough to hold the bandsaw too, and ditch the stand that came with the bandsaw. That way you have everything on the level. You can always add a short conveyor later if need be.
 

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I had a roller for my 9X16 saw for almost 15 years of daily use,,,

the rollers were about 3 feet apart,, 4 inches in diameter,, about 14 feet infeed,, about 6 feet outfeed.
Three feet between rollers was a great spacing,, there is no need for more rollers.
Anything to be cut that is less than 3 feet can be picked up, and doesn't need to be "rolled",,,

The most important thing that you would not expect is the rear stops on the infeed section.
They helped square the part to be cut with the saw,

Without them, tightening the vise can twist the saw to match the part,
rather than the saw staying stationary.

Also, you can see the infeed is tied to the outfeed section with two rectangular tubes.
this saw was subjected to some heavy duty use,,
I used to set four sticks of 4X4 square tube on the infeed at a time, and cut all four together.

We added an adjustable stop on the outfeed table so the saw could make repetitive cuts without measuring every cut.

I acquired my rollers used, they came out of a retail steel service shop.
other than needing paint, the 20+ year old rollers needed nothing to be functional,,
but, the PO had bolted them to the concrete,, where, I tied the two rollers together..

My "stop" worked just like the stop that comes with most saws, except it was "Supersized",,,

Down where the forklift is sitting in the pic,, I had two VERY heavy duty saw horses that were the same height as the infeed rollers.

I could drop several tons of square tube (and other shapes) on the saw horses,, then slide the piece(s) to be cut onto the infeed.
 

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This is the saw that was in the roller stands,,



One dilemma we had was coolant,,
I ended up having to add a piece of roofing just under the outfeed rollers.
The steel roofing caught the coolant, and directed it back to the saw to be reused.

Square tube always acted like a floor drain, carrying away the coolant as the tube was being cut.

Because of the coolant, and the bi-metal variable pitch blade,, I got thousands of cuts per blade,,,

The variable pitch of the blade is 5 to 8 teeth per inch
 
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