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I am working on my basement. I am getting ready to replace the existing sliding door with a pair of french doors. The slider is installed flush with the outside of the foundation. I will be framing a 2X4 wall inside. With a few inches of foam inside of an 8" concrete wall, I will have a roughly 14" thick wall between drywall and the outside of the house. So, last night, I had a thought. What if I mount the door in the interior framed wall and then trim out the opening passing through the foundation? From the inside, it will look more like an interior wall on the 1st floor. From the outside, I will have a recessed door that will reduce exposure to wind and rain. What am I missing here? What is wrong with this idea? Thoughts?

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Lee
 

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:think: I'M LOST-u mean u would leave ur sliding door installed and then mount the new door inside it:dunno:

i see no bad reason to having a larger thresh hold to walk thru, but i would want the bottom to slightly elevated some, or else caulk the living heck out of it, so water can't lay their. i am not a carpenter, so i am just adding my 2 cts:dunno::laugh:
 

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:think: I'M LOST-u mean u would leave ur sliding door installed and then mount the new door inside it:dunno:

i see no reason to having a larger thresh hold to walk thru, but i would want the bottom to slightly elevated some, or else caulk the living heck out of it, so water can't lay their. i am not a carpenter, so i am just adding my 2 cts:dunno::laugh:
I was wondering the same thing, if he was wanting to leave the sliding door or remove the slider and put the new door at the inside of the framework.

If that is what you are planning, I would use something besides not treated wood. If only treated wood I would still cover that with some type of metal.
 

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I would worry about the drainage in the recessed area. There will need to be a proper slope and sealing in that area so that if rain or snow blow into it they have a way out of it.
 

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There is no reason you couldn't do it. Like has been posted above, you will need a deep threshold with the proper slope that may require some custom fabrication and raise the bottom of the door creating a toe stubber of an exit unless you also do a raised floor inside. Also make sure the ground in front of the doorway slopes away from the house. It might look a bit odd from the outside as all the windows are flush with the exterior. On the inside you probably already have the deep windows, so a deep doorway won't look out of place.
 

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Do you use it a lot. Do you go thru it going out or in? Is it under a porch or open. It would be easier leaving it the way it is but that's the beauty of "It's YOUR house" do what you want. I just remodeled our Master bath and pulled the tub for a huge shower with three shower heads. It was the last tub in the house. Friends told me I was crazy for taking it out I told them it's my house if the next owner wants a tub he can put one back in. Good luck. :usa
 

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:dunno:

But since we (I) will be doing exactly the same thing shortly.....

I'll follow along. :bigthumb:
 

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These doors are inexpensive but made to fit one way, mounting it opposite of intended purpose first and most importantly puts the hinges on the outside, (thieves will thank you) the adjustable part on the outside where it will collect water, and the astragal (weather strip between the doors top to bottom) inside as well weather water and whatever will penetrate the door. The Brick moulding needs to be on the outside or removed (fine) and a jamb extension kit can be purchased at whatever store you bought it from to take it from the 2x4 wall to 2x6 usually around $26. The kit comes with an aluminum threshold extension and some wood jamb material. What I would do in your situation would be to remove the brick moulding, snake a 100% silicone caulk on the floor or whatever the threshold will sit on, install correct way but flush to the interior so the doors swing open to the wall and flat, add wood jamb extension and wrap in aluminum or Fypon (plastic jamb kit, google it) then nail the brick moulding to the jamb ext. Trim with white caulk any seams, sit back grab a beer, take some time and just bask in your glory knowing it will last till the house comes down.
 

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If I read your post correctly you need to mount the french door in your new framed opening inside or you will not be able to swing the door leaves much past 90 degrees on opening. This is one of the draw backs of french doors over sliding doors. Other comments above about threshold issues should be carefully thought through. Any grade and prevailing exterior water issues can be ruinous later on if not well thought through ahead of time. It probably doesn't snow a lot where you are but melting snow ice has to be anticipated as well. Trim is not always just trim.
 

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You can definitely setback the door, It's just going to involve alot more exterior finish work. Like a previous poster said, jam edge on the interior should be even with the Sheetrock so you can open doors all the way. Make sure you get the right foam!!!!! If you get the wrong foam, it will expand too much and push your jams toward the door.
 

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I am working on my basement. I am getting ready to replace the existing sliding door with a pair of french doors. The slider is installed flush with the outside of the foundation. I will be framing a 2X4 wall inside. With a few inches of foam inside of an 8" concrete wall, I will have a roughly 14" thick wall between drywall and the outside of the house. So, last night, I had a thought. What if I mount the door in the interior framed wall and then trim out the opening passing through the foundation? From the inside, it will look more like an interior wall on the 1st floor. From the outside, I will have a recessed door that will reduce exposure to wind and rain. What am I missing here? What is wrong with this idea? Thoughts?

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Lee
That is how I installed my basement entry door. We have a 12" block wall foundation. If you do not mount the door unit in the framed wall, the doors will only open to 90 degrees to the door frame.
 

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:think: I'M LOST-u mean u would leave ur sliding door installed and then mount the new door inside it:dunno:

i see no reason to having a larger thresh hold to walk thru, but i would want the bottom to slightly elevated some, or else caulk the living heck out of it, so water can't lay their. i am not a carpenter, so i am just adding my 2 cts:dunno::laugh:
I was wondering the same thing, if he was wanting to leave the sliding door or remove the slider and put the new door at the inside of the framework.

If that is what you are planning, I would use something besides not treated wood. If only treated wood I would still cover that with some type of metal.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks everyone, I have been having trouble getting online this AM. I appreciate all of the input and hate that I have taken so long to reply.

The slider is definitely gone. That is the objective. I had a door (single door) at the old house that was mounted on the outside and experience the "maximum 90 degrees opening". One of my reasons for a double hinged French door is that with both open, I would still have plenty of access. But, as I was contemplating this install, the idea of proper trim and proper opening of those doors became attractive.

For the outside, I understand that I will need to do proper trim and sealing. I will use Azek or similar to close everything in.

For the threshold, I had thought about adding a slight slope. I would want it to be minimal, which poses a problem for "slightly raising" an existing concrete surface. I am thinking that I would shim the entire door about 3/8”. Then, from the outside edge of the threshold, I expect to have 9-10” of area (6’ wide) that needs to pitch to the patio. There is already a 1.5”, or so, drop down from the basement floor slab to the patio. The patio also has a great slope away from the house. So, I am only worried about this new transition area that I am creating.

Has anyone ever tried this stuff? Top'N Bond Concrete Patcher |Sakrete

Lee
 

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That is how I installed my basement entry door. We have a 12" block wall foundation. If you do not mount the door unit in the framed wall, the doors will only open to 90 degrees to the door frame.
Chris,
Did you raise the door assembly any? Did you do anything to add a slope to this extended threshold? I was thinking of using some sort of waterproof shim. My preference would be something synthetic like PVC. I wonder if Azek is solid enough to support the weight of the door assembly? I could do something like Durarock, also.

I feel like this makes the initial door install more complicated but the inside drywall and trimwork becomes easier and the door will definitely work better.

Lee
 

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Some good ideas here. I have one last idea, make sure you do it yourself. We were going to do a similar door in our basement. My wife got this idea to have our grandkids do it as they worked in construction. They came down and did it while I was at work. 3 doors got done that day and all the while it was raining. When I came home I asked if they had squared them up. They didn't think they needed to be squared because they came in a frame. Got mad at me for asking. After they left I had to redo all 3 doors. The French doors were the worse. I was told that one of the Grandkids said he would never do any work for me again. Told my wife that's not a problem because I won't let him work for me again with the kind of work he does. I could see to the outside on all 3 doors and every one was out of square. :banghead:
 

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Some good ideas here. I have one last idea, make sure you do it yourself. We were going to do a similar door in our basement. My wife got this idea to have our grandkids do it as they worked in construction. They came down and did it while I was at work. 3 doors got done that day and all the while it was raining. When I came home I asked if they had squared them up. They didn't think they needed to be squared because they came in a frame. Got mad at me for asking. After they left I had to redo all 3 doors. The French doors were the worse. I was told that one of the Grandkids said he would never do any work for me again. Told my wife that's not a problem because I won't let him work for me again with the kind of work he does. I could see to the outside on all 3 doors and every one was out of square. :banghead:
Noted!
 

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Chris,
Did you raise the door assembly any? Did you do anything to add a slope to this extended threshold? I was thinking of using some sort of waterproof shim. My preference would be something synthetic like PVC. I wonder if Azek is solid enough to support the weight of the door assembly? I could do something like Durarock, also.

I feel like this makes the initial door install more complicated but the inside drywall and trimwork becomes easier and the door will definitely work better.

Lee
I raised the door 1 1/2" because I put a layer of 1" styrofoam over the concrete floor of the room & then laid laminate flooring over the styrofoam.
I did not taper the concrete sill because the door is under a car port.

I saw in your last post that you were thinking about using a concrete patch material to taper your sill. I would advise against doing that because it will not last. It will chip up in a short time. I would recommend getting a concrete grinding cup for an angle grinder & grinding a taper on the concrete sill, It will not take a lot of taper to get the water to run off. It will make a lot of dust unless you also get a dust hood also to hook to a vac.

Something like these.
https://www.amazon.com/Ocr-Concrete-Diamond-Grinding-Grinder/dp/B01CQQR3DW/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1488304906&sr=8-3&keywords=concrete+grinder
https://www.amazon.com/Grinders-Concrete-Grinding-Diamond-DAMO/dp/B005EP1NWA/ref=pd_sim_469_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=RW7JN9D74HMW64653HVR

Before you set the door in the opening, I recommend using great stuff foam as sealant between the threashold & concrete instead of caulking. Over time caulking will separate from the concrete and allow air & water to get in. I have never seen great stuff foam separate from concrete.
 

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I am working on my basement. I am getting ready to replace the existing sliding door with a pair of french doors. The slider is installed flush with the outside of the foundation. I will be framing a 2X4 wall inside. With a few inches of foam inside of an 8" concrete wall, I will have a roughly 14" thick wall between drywall and the outside of the house. So, last night, I had a thought. What if I mount the door in the interior framed wall and then trim out the opening passing through the foundation? From the inside, it will look more like an interior wall on the 1st floor. From the outside, I will have a recessed door that will reduce exposure to wind and rain. What am I missing here? What is wrong with this idea? Thoughts?

View attachment 321522
View attachment 321514
View attachment 321530

Lee
I would mount it on the framed wall and have them swing in. Hinges on the inside where thieves couldn't remove them for easy access. The code issue is the 14 or so inches of level space and then the 1 1/2" drop off to the existing patio slab. It is not tall enough for a step and to short in length (36") to meet the definition for a landing. Extending the length of the level landing to 36" would be code compliant. I see a toe tripper as planned but it is your call?:dunno:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Well damn! Many good points here. That is exactly what I was counting on.

There is no question that the doors will swing in. That has never been up for debate. If I leave the door mounted flush with the outside, I can eliminate the tripper that Pappa referenced. On the other hand, if I got aggressive and ground down the slope from the new door sill location out to the patio, I could kill both problems. BUT, I really believe that is a daunting task. I cut into this same concrete to move a shower drain a few weeks ago. Removing an inch of concrete (even if it tapers over a 9" distance) across a 6 foot opening is a lot of grinding. The dust could possibly be kept outdoors with some careful plastic and tape work. I think I would need more than a 4" angle grinder to cut that down.

On the flip side, although sub-optimal, I could leave the doors on the outside and limit the swing to 90 degrees. This would no doubt be the easy way. I would do a drywall return from the inside of the new wall back to the inside edge of the door frame. I need to look closer at this when I have time.

Thanks for the input.

Lee
 

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I would mount it on the framed wall and have them swing in. Hinges on the inside where thieves couldn't remove them for easy access.
One trick to solve the external hinge vs. thieves problem is to replace one of the hinge screws on top and bottom hinges with a headless #8 nail into the jamb and leave a 1" stub protruding that fits in the corresponding hinge hole on the door.

Even if they pop the hinge pins, the stubs keep the door in place.
 
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