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I tried the search function and never found a specific thread pertaining to them.

Sorry for mentioning this, but fall is in the air in my parts. Winter, right around the long corner. I'm wanting to be as prepared as possible.
One of the items on my wanna be tractor bucket list, is a battery maintainer. I've never had one. After a bit of research, I'm finding the brand, Battery Tender to be a wide-spread item.
Given the amount of models available, what would be the best suited for my x739?

Something to note, I'm not dead-set having to have the Battery Tender brand. My concern is quality electronics. So if there's another comparable trickle charger/maintainer out there I need to consider, I'm all ears. :thumbup1gif:

I appreciate your input.
 

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I started with one battery tender JR years ago and rotated it from the generator to the tractors and now have three of them so no rotating needed! They have worked very well for me and really cut down on the need to replace a battery every 2 or three years. I think I last bought a battery for one of the tractors about 6 years ago. :bigthumb:
 

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Tender

FA9DD44C-C703-4B32-A828-A5A9071D7332.jpeg

I have two of these. They work great.
 

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I was in the same place two yrs. ago new x730 i looked and some of the other charges out there but they didnt seem to be as good and user friendly this is the set up i went with so far it seems to work nice just plug and go ...
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I use one of the Noco charger/tenders with the handy plug that indicates capacity.



 
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Following this for more information.
I had an old Battery Tender that didnt work too great, and now have a small Schumacher 1A charger/maintainer. It works fine, but I dont leave it plugged in.
I plug it into the tractor or whatever and once it shows a full charge, I unplug it and leave it alone for a while.
My issue is that some of these, the older tender and this Schumacher, dont completely quit charging once the battery is full. Some will drop down to a very low charge rate, and continue charging, which can damage the battery.

If I were buying one today, and I probably will be buying a newer one, Id make sure it shut off completely when the battery is topped off. If I recall, the NOCO does this. Not sure about the others as I havent looked specifically at them. Id bet that quite a few more do today than they did years ago though.
That NOCO and its charging port are a pretty neat idea to me, which is why thats probably what Ill end up with. Lots of guys here seem to like them well enough.
 

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I bought 2 Battery Tender Jrs. for $19.95 on sale 15 or 20 year ago for my motorcycles, ATV, lawn tractor and infrequently used cars. They have always worked well. They will very slowly recharge a low battery but it may take days. When you attach it, the red light comes on and goes off when it turns green. I don't keep them on all the time but generally put them on overnight about once a month (but it wouldn't hurt to keep them on).
 

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I have the BT Jr's for both tractors and three motorcycles (one is my son's).

Stay away from the Horrible Fright ones....one cooked my neighbors new battery on his standby genset in 2 weeks.
 

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I've been using Battery Tenders for years which is why I've had some batteries last 10 & 11 years on a couple of the motorcycles. In fact, in both cases I replaced the batteries "just because" they were old enough and didn't want to press my luck. Each was still performing as required.

Come to think of it I also had another battery go close to 10 years on my Yamaha RX1ER snowmobile. These were all AGM batteries which tend to perform well.

Have also had good luck using them on the tractors when not in use.
 
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I have the Battery Tender Plus on my X748 which is my snow machine. I installed the direct battery connectors which come with the device. In winter, it is plugged in 24/7 until I need to blow snow. Even in Wisconsin's coldest time, the X748 battery performs as it does in summer and the X748 fires right up. When I'm done blowing snow I plug it back in and I'm ready for the next storm. As a side note, I have a couple other tractors that have the Battery Tender Plus plugged in all winter. They are all good to go in spring.

Sent from my SM-G900R4 using Tapatalk
 
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Great feedback here everyone :thumbup1gif:
 

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Battery Tenders - I have several of the waterproof model, and would recommend them. Less output than the open models, but I'm using them as maintainers, not as chargers, and I don't have to worry about leaving one out in the rain.

batterytender.jpg
 
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Speaking of battery tenders. Anyone know where I can find battery specs for the 1025R? Such as amp-hour rating?

Thanks.
 

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I've used these for years with great results. I like that they are also desulphators, which I believe the sulphation is what kills most batteries. JMO.

minder.JPG

Started using one on my wife's car after she retired. It would often set long enough for the battery to be discharged, and once it did it was usually toast. Was so impressed with using one of these on it that over the years I've accumulated enough of them to have one on everything that has a battery. Northern puts them on sale often with free shipping.

Operation is really simple. They have 2 lights, one red and one green. If the red light is on means it's plugged in to AC. If the green light is on steady means it is connected to battery. If both are on and the green light is steady means it is charging. Once it reaches full charge the green light starts blinking and then will just maintain the charge. I leave them connected all the time and I can't remember any battery lasting less than 10 years since I've been using them.

I usually make up some kind of socket with matching plug to mount in the grill or somewhere handy for connecting and disconnecting it, again started with my wife's car 'cause she was not going to raise the hood to connect it after she did drive it. But she will plug or unplug something if it's easily accessible.

On things like tractors or UTV's that have a power port that is not switched with the key I use these:

plug.JPG

On my pickup that has the factory socket for trailer lights and brakes I make up a cord that plugs into it, using the 12 volt line in it that goes to the battery.
 

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Speaking of battery tenders. Anyone know where I can find battery specs for the 1025R? Such as amp-hour rating?

Thanks.
I had to replace mine early on and I kept these notes on it, don't remember where I found the info.

Old battery CCA: 500
Old battery CA: 600

Mine cratered on a weekend when JD dealer was closed, I could not find any other battery of this group size with these specs. Finally settled for one from O'reilley's that had the best specs I could find for this group size:

New battery CCA: 360
New battery CA: 445

This one has been fine so far, will be 2 years old next month, original only lasted 2 years and 3 months. Was not using a battery minder on it, have been on the current one since new.
 

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Speaking of battery tenders. Anyone know where I can find battery specs for the 1025R? Such as amp-hour rating?

Thanks.
There was a battery thread not long ago. I copied and pasted my post for you.

Since I've recently had to replace 2 car batteries I've been preparing for day when my 1025R battery bites the dust, and to sum up what I've learned here at GTT and other sites:

1. Deere batteries appear to die sufddenly, with little, or more commonly no warning.

2. Original Deere batteries are wet cell lead acid batteries, and of all the current battery types, these are the least resistant to damage from vibration. The wet cell advantage is that they tend to be less expensive than AGM or lithium batteries.

2. The Deere battery is vented, meaning the battery gases are carried via a tube to a location away rom the radiator. The gases can cause corrosion of expensive parts, thus the vent. If replacing with a wet cell original type battery, make sure the new battery is vented correctly.

3. The original 1025R battery is part number LV15187. It is a Group 22NF battery. Dimensions are 8.003 inches high x 5.439 inches wide x 8.545 inches high. CCA is 500, CA is 600.

4. Looking at non-Deere brand replacements the AGM (absorbent glass mat) type seems to be a good option. AGM batteries tend to be more vibration resistant, plus they are sealed and are not vented. If buying a battery on line, wet cell batteries are shipped dry, and require that you fill them with sulfuric acid. AGM batteries are shipped ready to use. Cost savings on-line can be significant versus picking the same battery up in a store. I saved $50 each on my last 2 car batteries this way.

4. Replacement batteries for the 1025R can be either Group 22NF or Group 51R. You will be way more likely to find a Group 51R battery stocked by auto parts stores than the 22NF Group batteries. Non-Deere batteries are the same size as the Deere LV15187 battery (very close, not exact). The Deere battery seems to have a different configuartion to the battery bottom, so non-Deere battery mounting may require a little modification with spacers, etc. This does not appear from reading many posts on this to be a big deal.

5. Without going into boring detail of who makes which batteries under which labels, and what batteries used to be good but are now lousy (a lot of strong opinions are out there in internet land), there are a number of alternative batteries out there to replace the stock Deere brand. You might save a little money on line if you can wait a couple of days for delivery. Finding a battery with the same or more CA and CCA than the Deere may be difficult, but if you live in a warm climate like me, that may not be a big factor.
 

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Never used a battery tender.
Just pull the battery from the tractor or what ever and store the battery in a warm area.
In the case of something stored in a heated garage I leave it in and make sure there is no load on it. If in doubt I disconnect the battery.

I have had batteries with not enough umph to do their job after winter, I just put them on a charger for a couple of minutes till they can start the vehicle up and they are almost always good for another year or two as long as they are run once or so a month.

I figure batteries last roughly in the range of 7-8 years, longer sometimes less other times.

I like to keep things simple, one less gadget to have around and no electrical load.

I don't doubt they work but I've lived without one for 60 years I can manage a few more.

Just another opinion/thought on the subject for what little its worth.
 

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Never used a battery tender.
I never used to either and my batteries always seemed to die over the winter. Since using a tender no more issues. The issue became particularly important with our emergency generator. In cold weather the battery would get to where it would barely turn over. Now I keep a Battery Tender Jr. on it and regardless of the temperatures it cranks at full power.

Just pull the battery from the tractor or what ever and store the battery in a warm area.
Good advice but it is not always practical on equipment that you may need on a moments notice.

I figure batteries last roughly in the range of 7-8 years, longer sometimes less other times.
Statistics show that anything over about 5 years is borrowed time.
 
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I also have the Genius 3500. “Buy Once, Cry Once.”
 
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Jgayman, your comment on a battery tender on your back up generator reminded me that in a way I do have a battery tender.
We have solar with a battery backup for power outages.
The battery bank is being watched/charged by the solar or the grid as required so its always ready to go. System has a computer that controls solar, batteries and grid.

We looked at generators and decided to go with batteries because as like you mentioned, one has to deal with maintaining generators so that they will run as needed.
Fuel and the ability to work (start) are issues that in the loop batteries didn't have.

For a guy who likes things simple I guess I have the most complex and expensive battery tender around.
I can always blame my wife, she wanted the solar and the back up.:laugh:
 
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