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Since I bought my tractor it has rolled over slow. Battery is old and has a leak at positive post. Today it suddenly won't start at all. Turn the key and the lights come on but the relays click and that's it. I hooked the cables directly to the battery cables in the tractor and same thing. I want to say replace battery, which I will do anyway. But does this sound like an alternator issue? Every alternator I've seen go out in a tractor happens really fast, losing all your accessories.
 

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Since I bought my tractor it has rolled over slow. Battery is old and has a leak at positive post. Today it suddenly won't start at all. Turn the key and the lights come on but the relays click and that's it. I hooked the cables directly to the battery cables in the tractor and same thing. I want to say replace battery, which I will do anyway. But does this sound like an alternator issue? Every alternator I've seen go out in a tractor happens really fast, losing all your accessories.

Are you serious? Get that leakey battery out asap if not sooner. Wash everything down with battery cleaner or baking soda and water. Then wash the cleaner off with regular water. You need to neutralize the battery acid first thing. Just using water will make it worse.

Then get a new quality battery. Be sure it is fully charged. Should be over 12.7 volts to start. If not charge it first. Shine up the posts and terminals before connecting them. Also check the cables for internal corrosion. They should not be hard to bend. Also check them for swollen areas. If you can see the wire it shouldn't look like an old penny. If you find any of the above replace the cables.

Now you can start the engine and check the charging system.

Also resist the temptation to jump start your tractor.
 

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I am trying to figure out why this might be an alternator issue. I am going to stay tuned for further details of this story.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I did pull it and clean up everything. Several people said it's an alternator. But I didn't think it was. I'm replacing with a John Deere battery tomorrow.
 

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If the battery is visually bad then you should obviously replace it. Once you do, start the engine and test the voltage on the battery. It should read about 14 volts with the engine rev'd up. If you get this voltage then your alternator is good.
 

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Thanks. I'll do that. Just finished my sprayer rebuild and was starting the tractor to test it so I'd like it resolved.
 

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Thanks. I'll do that. Just finished my sprayer rebuild and was starting the tractor to test it so I'd like it resolved.

If that sprayer has an electric motor to pump the juice it will make a battery problem worse.

The point I was trying to make is. Battery acid tends to leach out of the plastic case on it's own. Usually through the vents/caps but a broken case is like a freeway for it. This will also vent the hydrogen gas produced by the battery working. (Charging or discharging). Out gassing presents a dangerous explosion hazard. One wrong spark and PUH-POW! Also acid getting on any of the surrounding parts will corrode them quick. This is why you never want to use a battery with a cracked case. Even if that is the only problem with it.

Also be careful using an open end wrench on the terminals. The ends of it can crack the case while tightening or loosening the connections.
 

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Since I bought my tractor it has rolled over slow. Battery is old and has a leak at positive post. Today it suddenly won't start at all. Turn the key and the lights come on but the relays click and that's it. I hooked the cables directly to the battery cables in the tractor and same thing. I want to say replace battery, which I will do anyway. But does this sound like an alternator issue? Every alternator I've seen go out in a tractor happens really fast, losing all your accessories.



to check for bad battery first thing is check voltage with the tractor turn off ...like others have said 12.5 or so voltage while off. hook your volt meter to the battery and try to start. see what happens to the voltage it should drop down to no less then 10.8 volts that is testing the load capacity of the battery

a battery can read 12v but cant handle a load ..anything under 10.5v and it wont start or turn over slowly ..
alternator as others have said can be tested on the tractor should be 14v-16v under certian conditions but it must also not over charge the battery.

if by leaking you mean the post/connection is corroded thats not a huge deal but still needs to be addressed . if you can see battery acid coming out of the battery then that battery needs replaced no matter what. as others have said

lots of things can draw on your battery when tractor is turned off and if you have some thing drawing more then it should your battery will be low next time you go to start it thats why you check the voltage while tractor is off first...

gunk makes a battery acid leak detecter and neutralizer/cleaner in a spray can spray all over battery . it sprays on yellow and if there is battery acid it turns red .. then you just wash it off with water . works good then you can find any leaks big or small that you cant see. then you can use a spray like the deka in the pic . on your new battery.:greentractorride:
 

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Sounds like you need a new battery regardless. 56 ford gave you good advice. A good battery should have a voltage of 12.6 volts when not under load/starting. You alternators output should be around 13.7-14.7 volts. It has to have a higher voltage to overcome the battery potential/voltage in order to charge. If you have a charger or other source that's capable of turning over your diesel you can disconnect that source after it starts and read the voltage at the battery terminal wires to check you alternator voltage. If you get a new battery which you should, do the same thing after it starts with the new battery. The voltage regulator is what senses the battery voltage and switches the alternator output to the battery to bring it back up. years ago, they were a separate module that you unplugged and swapped out. They were also inexpensive. Today in almost all cases, they are built right in the alternator. However, I'm really don't know if that's the case on tractor alternators but a quick look in a tach manual will show you in the wiring diagram. I would also bet it's probably in the alternator.

Don't confuse the diodes in the alternator with the regulator. An alternator unlike a dc generator actually puts out an AC wave form that the diodes rectify to DC and then go to the regulator to be constantly switched on and off to battery to keep it up full charge. You can remove and test them with an ohmmeter. Alternate the leads and it should be infinite with one polarity and almost a short circuit with the other polarity from your meter. I say almost because there is a minuscule potential to overcome when a diode is forward biased.

Ps, use penetrox/no ox on the terminals, it is great stuff. We use to use it on aluminum to copper splices. It looks like a dark vasoline. Any electricians supply house has it and Home Depot actually stocks is. It is a conductive grease that you can put on your battery terminals after cleaning the posts and wire lead ends. It's fantastic stuff that prevents oxidation and works when dissimilar metals are terminated together too. Your battery hookup won't become resistive.

Hope info helps.

Don
 

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The better was just toast. It's charging fine but I have to replace the positive cable end.
Just don't get one of those clamp terminals like this.



You want to crimp or solder the cable in the battery terminal. If you can't do either then replace the entire cable with a factory one or something similar.
 

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Nope, went to the parts store and got another eyelet type and crimped it on. Works well. Is there any benefit to crimping AND soldering it on?
 

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Nope, went to the parts store and got another eyelet type and crimped it on. Works well. Is there any benefit to crimping AND soldering it on?
The clamp type doesn't give a good connection. You will always have resistance at the clamp. Not only will it give you inferior performance, it will eventually fail you and leave you stranded.

A proper end that is kept clean will last darned near forever.
 

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Nope, went to the parts store and got another eyelet type and crimped it on. Works well. Is there any benefit to crimping AND soldering it on?
A proper crimp will not have room for the solder to flow into the joint. I've seen several soldered connections fail under heavy load, crimping is my preferred method.
 

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A proper crimp will not have room for the solder to flow into the joint. I've seen several soldered connections fail under heavy load, crimping is my preferred method.
Is there a reasonably priced tool for criping these cables?

When I had to replace a cable end on my 2520 the only way to do it is to feed the straight cable through the opening in the firewall of sorts where the radiators are mounted. I had no choice but to use a clamp style cable end.

I would have loved to have a cable properly made up with crimped ends but no way to route it with the end already installed.

Would like to do something better with it in the future but don't want to invest in an expensive tool.
 

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A proper crimp will not have room for the solder to flow into the joint. I've seen several soldered connections fail under heavy load, crimping is my preferred method.
I agree.
 

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Is there a reasonably priced tool for criping these cables?

When I had to replace a cable end on my 2520 the only way to do it is to feed the straight cable through the opening in the firewall of sorts where the radiators are mounted. I had no choice but to use a clamp style cable end.

I would have loved to have a cable properly made up with crimped ends but no way to route it with the end already installed.

Would like to do something better with it in the future but don't want to invest in an expensive tool.
You can get one of these fairly cheap. $20 - $30 and they work really good. You need a hammer but I'm sure you have one.



You can put one of these ends on the cable, feed it through the firewall and then bolt it to the cheap battery cable end. They come with two bolts so just pick one.

 
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