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For the past few days I have been using the 1025R payloader on various small jobs on the farm. Tractor started always quick, no problems. Today, shut it off, 10 minutes later tried to start, nothing. Would not turn over. Tried to charge the battery, and it would not take a charge. Battery was only 3 years old, but completely dead. John Deere dealer said also the battery was dead, and said it is not unusual for the maintenance free batteries to suddenly die with no prior warning. New battery solves the problem, but I question the JD dealer. I have never, ever had a battery suddenly die with normal use.
Anybody out there with a similar experience.
 

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Ive had it happen a couple times.

Quite often, its on newer vehicles. Its not that the battery is completely dead, but because of the computer controls, they act that way.
Most recent one was our Explorer, it left us that way in the grocery store parking lot. It had been started 5 times that particular day. Went to start if after we were done and nothing.
New battery solved it.

If you dont run them for long periods to recover the charge, it is a good idea to use some type of trickle charger like a Battery Tender, or any of several others.
What I mean is, lots of guys use them for a few minutes at a time, then shut down, then restart for a few minutes work, then shut down, etc.
Thats hard on the battery over time, if its not getting its full charge.
 

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Yes on 2305, somewhat older but working fine and then dead as a doornail
 

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It's not uncommon for a battery to develop a dead short where a plate breaks free and contacts another and therefore shorts the entire battery. While battery technology is certainly improving, demands have also and we are getting more and more capacity out of batteries which means thinner plates and potentially less durability. I view batteries like tires and I always buy high end, and always put the highest capacity battery in as a replacement. I never buy batteries based on the cheapest price nor tires. This is not to imply that I am not frugal, nothing could be further from the truth. It is just that the better quality seems to last longer and I get better performance along the way. Batteries in anything off-road have a tough life from bouncing around and exposed to vast temperature changes.
Along this line, I have a bone of contention with new computerized battery load testers. Many times I have taken a battery in when it was beginning to fail. Especially in a diesel, crank speed is essential to start, and if you feel your starting RPM starting to drop, you know, either your batteries or starter is getting tired. The computerized tester will show them as good every time, but in fact you are just days or weeks away from a failure. Either a failure to start, or the battery will die. I much prefer the old style carbon pile load testers where they put a real load on the battery and showed results. They were infallible. If the CCA wasn't there, it clearly showed in that real world test. The new testers show voltage and surface voltage that is adequate does not equate to cranking power. IMHO, it is a way to avoid honoring warranties on batteries. If a vendor insists that you put a battery back in service that you know is failing, take your business elsewhere. Keep in mind that there are only 3 major manufacturers of starting flooded automotive batteries in the US and 4 AGM (Absorbed Glass Mat). So, service is essential. If a machine has dual batteries, I always replace in pairs and use the one good take out in something else, and, I switch from side to side on occasion. Terminal cleaning and corrosion prevention reaps big dividends. Solar trickle chargers are cheap and a great way to keep equipment in a shed in top starting form.
 

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For the past few days I have been using the 1025R payloader on various small jobs on the farm. Tractor started always quick, no problems. Today, shut it off, 10 minutes later tried to start, nothing. Would not turn over. Tried to charge the battery, and it would not take a charge. Battery was only 3 years old, but completely dead. John Deere dealer said also the battery was dead, and said it is not unusual for the maintenance free batteries to suddenly die with no prior warning. New battery solves the problem, but I question the JD dealer. I have never, ever had a battery suddenly die with normal use. Anybody out there with a similar experience.
The dealer is correct. That is EXACTLY how my 2720 battery died. It was about 4 years old. It always started without hesitation. One day I pulled the tractor out of the garage and shut the engine off. 10-mins later I tried to start the tractor and NOTHING. Dead as a door nail and would not take a charge. And it always had a battery tender attached.
 
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iIf you dont run them for long periods to recover the charge, it is a good idea to use some type of trickle charger like a Battery Tender, or any of several others. What I mean is, lots of guys use them for a few minutes at a time, then shut down, then restart for a few minutes work, then shut down, etc. Thats hard on the battery over time, if its not getting its full charge.
My JD battery died suddenly despite always being hooked to a battery tender.
 
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I had the same thing happen on my last 2 cars. They suddenly died with no warning after 4 years. I now have a 2016 Honda CRV and was on a CRV forum reading about batteries. They were talking about batteries dying suddenly and one poster said that maintenance free batteries aren't really. He suggested taking off the "non-removeable" caps and adding distilled water if needed. I took the caps off of my 2 year old battery and the acid was down to the top of the plates. I added water and all has been well so far. I think they are low maintenance and not maintenance free.
 

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My 2012 1026R did the same thing. It was fine and then it was just dead. This JD battery lasted 6 years so I wasn't too mad. I do put mine on a charger a few times a month.

-636
 

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Ive had it happen a couple times.

Quite often, its on newer vehicles. Its not that the battery is completely dead, but because of the computer controls, they act that way.
Most recent one was our Explorer, it left us that way in the grocery store parking lot. It had been started 5 times that particular day. Went to start if after we were done and nothing.
New battery solved it.

If you dont run them for long periods to recover the charge, it is a good idea to use some type of trickle charger like a Battery Tender, or any of several others.
What I mean is, lots of guys use them for a few minutes at a time, then shut down, then restart for a few minutes work, then shut down, etc.
Thats hard on the battery over time, if its not getting its full charge.
Because of my and others experience with batteries dying a quick death - had the same happen to my 2520.

One day in my ‘09 Ford pickup going to town the NAV screen started doing some funny things. I immediately thought of how my tractor battery died and went straight to the dealer to have the battery replaced.

This time I noticed a sign of the battery failing which is rare. Knew I had to take care of it right away before it let us sit at one of the stores.
 

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My JD battery died suddenly despite always being hooked to a battery tender.
They dont make them last any longer, just keep them charged to their capacity, which is dependent on age and condition.
My point was/is, when you pull large amounts of power from the battery, IE starting, the battery needs to be fully charged again before shutdown. If its only run for a few minutes, that doesnt happen. Thats where the tender helps.
 

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They dont make them last any longer, just keep them charged to their capacity, which is dependent on age and condition. My point was/is, when you pull large amounts of power from the battery, IE starting, the battery needs to be fully charged again before shutdown. If its only run for a few minutes, that doesnt happen. Thats where the tender helps.
My understanding was that keeping them fully charged DOES help to make them last longer???
 

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Deere batteries have a history of suddenly dying.
 
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My understanding was that keeping them fully charged DOES help to make them last longer???
True, but they can also kill them faster.
Some tests on certain brands of chargers (I don’t recall which) show they never actually stop charging, which is also bad. Even at .5 Amp charge, you can easily overcharge and damage a battery.

Personally, I don’t like the Strongbox batteries. I have better luck with Walmart batteries, oddly enough.
Should my 2025s battery die prematurely, I’ll get an AGM type.

Strongbox batteries are supposed to have the plates set in epoxy, which is something they say no one or not many others do.
Ive never seen the inside of too many batteries, but it doesnt seem to work too well to help longevity.
 

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Since I've recently had to replace 2 car batteries I've been preparing for day when my 1025R battery bites the dust, and to sum up what I've learned here at GTT and other sites:

1. Deere batteries appear to die sufddenly, with little, or more commonly no warning.

2. Original Deere batteries are wet cell lead acid batteries, and of all the current battery types, these are the least resistant to damage from vibration. The wet cell advantage is that they tend to be less expensive than AGM or lithium batteries.

2. The Deere battery is vented, meaning the battery gases are carried via a tube to a location away rom the radiator. The gases can cause corrosion of expensive parts, thus the vent. If replacing with a wet cell original type battery, make sure the new battery is vented correctly.

3. The original 1025R battery is part number LV15187. It is a Group 22NF battery. Dimensions are 8.003 inches high x 5.439 inches wide x 8.545 inches high. CCA is 500, CA is 600.

4. Looking at non-Deere brand replacements the AGM (absorbent glass mat) type seems to be a good option. AGM batteries tend to be more vibration resistant, plus they are sealed and are not vented. If buying a battery on line, wet cell batteries are shipped dry, and require that you fill them with sulfuric acid. AGM batteries are shipped ready to use. Cost savings on-line can be significant versus picking the same battery up in a store. I saved $50 each on my last 2 car batteries this way.

4. Replacement batteries for the 1025R can be either Group 22NF or Group 51R. You will be way more likely to find a Group 51R battery stocked by auto parts stores than the 22NF Group batteries. Non-Deere batteries are the same size as the Deere LV15187 battery (very close, not exact). The Deere battery seems to have a different configuartion to the battery bottom, so non-Deere battery mounting may require a little modification with spacers, etc. This does not appear from reading many posts on this to be a big deal.

5. Without going into boring detail of who makes which batteries under which labels, and what batteries used to be good but are now lousy (a lot of strong opinions are out there in internet land), there are a number of alternative batteries out there to replace the stock Deere brand. You might save a little money on line if you can wait a couple of days for delivery. Finding a battery with the same or more CA and CCA than the Deere may be difficult, but if you live in a warm climate like me, that may not be a big factor.
 

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The JD battery in my 1025r died at a little over 2 years old while the engine was running. Never had that to happen with anything before.

It had started up fine and was running OK, I hit the MMM lift switch and all the lights in the dash flashed then went out and the engine died. Something apparently opened up in the battery, would not take a charge.
 

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True, but they can also kill them faster.
Some tests on certain brands of chargers (I don’t recall which) show they never actually stop charging, which is also bad. Even at .5 Amp charge, you can easily overcharge and damage a battery.
I use a Deltran Battery Tender Jr. on my generator and a solar Deltran 10W Solar Battery Tender on the tractor.



 

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4. Looking at non-Deere brand replacements the AGM (absorbent glass mat) type seems to be a good option. AGM batteries tend to be more vibration resistant, plus they are sealed and are not vented. If buying a battery on line, wet cell batteries are shipped dry, and require that you fill them with sulfuric acid. AGM batteries are shipped ready to use. Cost savings on-line can be significant versus picking the same battery up in a store. I saved $50 each on my last 2 car batteries this way.
That's for sure. When my Honda generator needed a new battery the OEM Honda part was over $240. I checked the battery and found it was a Yuasa AGM battery and I was able to get the identical battery on-line for $125.
 

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I still have the original battery in my 2011 1026R. Kinda been thinking of replacing it before winter. But , part of me wants to see how long it will last. The JD dealer is only 5 miles away . And I have a Fleet Farm , Napa, Menards,and a Walmart within 10 miles of me , so finding a replacement battery quickly shouldn’t be a problem.:dunno:
 

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I still have the original battery in my 2011 1026R. Kinda been thinking of replacing it before winter. But , part of me wants to see how long it will last. The JD dealer is only 5 miles away . And I have a Fleet Farm , Napa, Menards,and a Walmart within 10 miles of me , so finding a replacement battery quickly shouldn’t be a problem.:dunno:
Do you have a Jump Box handy? After reading all the sudden death posts I was counting the days until my 2720 battery died. It finally died at a fairly inopportune time when it was sitting in the middle of the driveway. Had I not had a Jump Box handy it would have been a real PITA.

Since getting a Jump Box I really no longer worry about any of my batteries suddenly dying. It was money well spent.
 
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