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I just got done mowing yesterday and had disconnected the MMM to blow off the grass.
After blowing around the bearing housings, I noticed the "MADE IN CHINA" on the aluminum
housing. I have to say I was disappointed in this.. I was hoping JD would cheapen and add China made
parts..Anyone else noticed other items on their John Deere that are "MADE IN CHINA"?
 

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Don't look at you loader mounts!

Yes, it is unfortunate but it is a "global economy" as they say...
 

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I'm not surprised but i could have gone all day without knowing that and been happy. Long as it works I guess.
If we avoided all things made in China these days I think we would end up living in a stick hut with nothing in it and walking to work. For what its worth, I think it's the manufacturers spec that determines the quality control of the product not just where it is manufactured.
 

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For what its worth, I think it's the manufacturers spec that determines the quality control of the product not just where it is manufactured.

I agree 100% :good2:
 

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For what its worth, I think it's the manufacturers spec that determines the quality control of the product not just where it is manufactured.
Not only the end users spec, but also the end users QA process.

Spec all you want, but you better inspect!
 

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Not only the end users spec, but also the end users QA process.

Spec all you want, but you better inspect!
That's getting to be a lost art and left up to the customer.
 

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This is what came on a brand new 47" JD snowblower that the dealer said was fine.. Even with the super duper intergalactic warrantee I ended up changing out this part, dealer would not.. The blower never even saw snow yet, it was run just to be tested after being installed for the first time.

View attachment 44121 View attachment 44122

The impeller was against the housing and you can see the wear, but that was okay,, Ya sure it was, and the second picture shows the abuse from the factory and notice the name on the bearing. Still don't know why only half of the flange was wearing?? The eccentric collar was not engaged either and if you zoom up the image you can see the inner race of the bearing was wearing irregularly because the shaft was spinning inside the race.. Great stuff made in China.. Jeff
 

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This is what came on a brand new 47" JD snowblower that the dealer said was fine.. Even with the super duper intergalactic warrantee I ended up changing out this part, dealer would not.. The blower never even saw snow yet, it was run just to be tested after being installed for the first time.

View attachment 44121 View attachment 44122

The impeller was against the housing and you can see the wear, but that was okay,, Ya sure it was, and the second picture shows the abuse from the factory and notice the name on the bearing. Still don't know why only half of the flange was wearing?? The eccentric collar was not engaged either and if you zoom up the image you can see the inner race of the bearing was wearing irregularly because the shaft was spinning inside the race.. Great stuff made in China.. Jeff
eek.gif
 

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I'm not surprised but i could have gone all day without knowing that and been happy. Long as it works I guess.
If we avoided all things made in China these days I think we would end up living in a stick hut with nothing in it and walking to work. For what its worth, I think it's the manufacturers spec that determines the quality control of the product not just where it is manufactured.
Yes, but in China they would make the frame out of 6" Poplar. Everywhere else they would use 6" treated Oak. It's made of wood and to the correct dimensions, right?


Mr. Moose
 

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Hiya,

Not to sound negative but it's really all part of the business. There used to be a lot of tractor makers that made products that lasted for generations that didn't break down who aren't around anymore, for example Allis Chalmers.

Part of staying in business is that you have to sell products that have a good reputation that are reasonable in cost, that will get through the warranty period with very few issues but will provide a steady stream of replacement part and service labor income throughout their lifespan.

If the manufactures build a product so high in quality that it lasts it's entire life without needing parts, they eventually will go out of business as they won't sell another unit for 40 years. (think Bobcat push mowers, Economy Power King, Wheel Horse, Hann etc) By lowering the initial cost of the units by making it with lower cost components, not only do they appeal to new buyers with the price, they build in income for the lifetime of the product as the lower cost components will need more frequent repair and replacement. As long as this can be perceived as "reasonable" by the buyers, their reputation will remain high, once they jump the shark and are seen as "low quality" they will loose market share and start the death spiral such as Cub Cadet.

My 2 cents,
Tom
 

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Not only the end users spec, but also the end users QA process.

Spec all you want, but you better inspect!
ABSOLUTELY CORRECT! I've been in purchasing for manufacturing for over 30 years. At my last employer we hired a Supplier Quality Engineer that had worked for another local mfg co. He traveled to China and other low cost countries 3-4 times a year for a minimum of three weeks each trip. Had done that for twelve years when he started with our company. He said the exact same thing. Spec's don't mean much to lcc's, low cost countries. You have to demand what you need, demand to see inspection results before shipment, them confirm compliance once you get the parts. And still you will find something that compromises the quality and usability of the parts.

FWIW, JD gets lots and lots of parts from India. They use a L-O-T of imported steel bar, sheet, plate from China too. My experience is that China has very capable machine shops, use up to date CNC technology, have capable secondary suppliers to do coatings, heat treat, etc. But their wrought metal production industries are stuck in the pre-industrial revolution era. And you can't make good parts with crappy metals. They have all the state of the art testing equipment, but they don't check for everything. And the guy sweeping the floor of the melt shop dumps all the dirt into the furnaces. I tried to buy a small special Teflon coated brass screw machine part from China for almost four years. First set of samples they shipped were made from their Chinese potable water alloy, I quarantined those parts. Next batch of samples high iron, next batch high aluminum, last batch high lead. I blew my temper! Three Strikes, I was ready to kick them to the curb! CONSTANT INSPECTION OF EVERY SHIPMENT is the only way to make sure you get usable parts. By the time you add in in-house inspection costs to total cost of possession plus the high freight costs you can buy from excellent domestic suppliers for less cost.
 

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. As long as this can be perceived as "reasonable" by the buyers, their reputation will remain high, once they jump the shark and are seen as "low quality" they will loose market share and start the death spiral such as Cub Cadet.

My 2 cents,
Tom
MANY MANY more new Cub Cadets in my area than any other brand of yard equipment. No "DEATH SPIRAL" here.... 51 miles from Horicon! No new JD's at all.
 

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Don't look at you loader mounts!

Yes, it is unfortunate but it is a "global economy" as they say...
Sounds more like an anti made in USA economy.........!

Everybody knows china bearings are JUNK. It is well known. Yes the china junk bearings will function as they leave the dealer but will live short lives. Why would any manufacturer use them? It cheapens there reputation.
 

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Hiya,

Not to sound negative but it's really all part of the business. There used to be a lot of tractor makers that made products that lasted for generations that didn't break down who aren't around anymore, for example Allis Chalmers.

Part of staying in business is that you have to sell products that have a good reputation that are reasonable in cost, that will get through the warranty period with very few issues but will provide a steady stream of replacement part and service labor income throughout their lifespan.

If the manufactures build a product so high in quality that it lasts it's entire life without needing parts, they eventually will go out of business as they won't sell another unit for 40 years. (think Bobcat push mowers, Economy Power King, Wheel Horse, Hann etc) By lowering the initial cost of the units by making it with lower cost components, not only do they appeal to new buyers with the price, they build in income for the lifetime of the product as the lower cost components will need more frequent repair and replacement. As long as this can be perceived as "reasonable" by the buyers, their reputation will remain high, once they jump the shark and are seen as "low quality" they will loose market share and start the death spiral such as Cub Cadet.

My 2 cents,
Tom
To some degree you're correct Tom but there are other issues at play. There is a huge difference between engineering in a life span and faulty components. For example you can put in plain bronze bearings or you can put in ball bearings. That is a valid engineering decision which will yield a life span for a product and you know that going into the purchase experience. When you buy an angle grinder from Princess Auto or Harbor Freight, you know that it is a cheap tool. When you buy Bosch, you expect good bearings.

Put that into the vehicle/tractor world and you have the cheaper MTD mowers versus the John Deere mowers. You expect that the John Deere dealer mowers will have a ball bearing (in a cast iron housing) in it that is a longer life span than a plain bearing in a die cast housing. What you don't expect is a ball bearing that hasn't had proper QC inspections done.
 

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Guess where Harley Davidson motorcycles are assembled now?
One of their salespersons told me the parts are made in the U.S.A., shipped to India, assembled there, bike is sent back to the U.S., and sold on the showroom floors.
I didn't "fact-check" behind him, but, if true.......very disturbing. :nunu:
 

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Guess where Harley Davidson motorcycles are assembled now?
One of their salespersons told me the parts are made in the U.S.A., shipped to India, assembled there, bike is sent back to the U.S., and sold on the showroom floors.
I didn't "fact-check" behind him, but, if true.......very disturbing. :nunu:
:gaah: :thumbsdown::dunno:What can you say to that?
 

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Sounds more like an anti made in USA economy.........!

Everybody knows china bearings are JUNK. It is well known. Yes the china junk bearings will function as they leave the dealer but will live short lives. Why would any manufacturer use them? It cheapens therereputation.
And the answer is...... JD and most other mfg'ers KNOW that these days they are selling to a "LOW EXPECTATION MARKET". (They figure) "...so it's got some cheap-o parts... so it's got some manufacturing shortcuts that will fail early... consumers are still buying our stuff out there, raving about how good we are... AND we're doing a great business selling and installing (+ labor) replacement parts and new products sooner..."

The time has long past where the consumer market could have driven the entire process the other way by DEMANDING decent, reasonable results from the products they buy. We won the "Price War" and lost the "Quality Product Battle". See ya' at Harbor Freight and the JD parts counter.:laugh:
 

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Guess where Harley Davidson motorcycles are assembled now?
One of their salespersons told me the parts are made in the U.S.A., shipped to India, assembled there, bike is sent back to the U.S., and sold on the showroom floors.
I didn't "fact-check" behind him, but, if true.......very disturbing. :nunu:
Actually I think they were thinking of HD's new 500 & 750 cc machine for entry riders. Those models are designed to be sold around the globe. Most all there bikes are built in the states with some parts from China etc. same as JD or most a thing else.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Not knocking any one company ,but we live in a throw away world. Yes we expect everything to last for ever or at least longer than ,"Well its paid for ".
Look at our home appliances , home furnace or cooling systems. When we first got married 44 yrs ago , every appliance for the house lasted over 20+ years the last washer and dryers lasted less than 10 yrs and the kids have been gone for years , just the two of us now .

It costs more to repair a item ( if you can find someone to repair or your not able to do it your self) than to buy a new item.

Yes we all want our tractor no matter what brand to run for ever and to have no problems. WRONG even in todays world of .001 of getting a item machined correctly .
Over the past 6 years of delivering parts, I've seen made in USA, Japan, China, and other countries . They all wear out , they will break , some the very same day part was installed , and others after a year or two .
 
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