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I have 400# of rimguard beet juice in my rear tires on my 2025r. I check the tires with the valve stems in the top position like you should. But i still get a little juice on/in my pressure checker. I was noticing while check some other tires the other day that the checker is now sticking from the beet juice. Do you guys ever lube your checkers or is there a better style the juice wont gum up?
 
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I've had the same issue. Good question...waiting to see if others handle it in some way that saves the guage.
 
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I have one of those gauges.

It still got sticky after checking the Rim-Guard tires on my 2305.


The tire shop suggested hitting the valve stem with the air chuck (while at 12 o'clock) with a quick shot of air to clear the stem.

It seemed to work better.

Now, anyone have any ideas how to fix the sticky gauge that I still have, I'm all ears...:munch:
 

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Now, anyone have any ideas how to fix the sticky gauge that I still have, I'm all ears...:munch:
Check the air pressure a few times in my X585. I used washer fluid not beet juice...
 

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Somewhere in my shop I've got a "wet" gauge..

If I remember about $10-12 at the farm supply store..

The times I've used it, I took it in the house and rinsed it out just because
it seemed a good idea..

I used auto anti freeze and washer fluid for tire fill here for my cold winters..

Good luck..
 
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I don't have filled tires, but I would try a round/dial type tire gauge. They have a sealed bourdon tube inside and the moving parts are not subjected to the beet juice. As long as the fluid does not harden you should be OK.

The pencil type gauges have a moving cup inside the tube held by a spring inside. The moving cup is what gets gummed up.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I don't have filled tires, but I would try a round/dial type tire gauge. They have a sealed bourdon tube inside and the moving parts are not subjected to the beet juice. As long as the fluid does not harden you should be OK.

The pencil type gauges have a moving cup inside the tube held by a spring inside. The moving cup is what gets gummed up.

Just my 2 cents.
never heard or seen one ill do some looking. Thanks for the idea!
 
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Yep, that's the type. You can find similar at just about any auto parts store, and probably Tractor Supply too. They are a little bit more expensive than the pencil types, but some don't have a hold feature, or a bleed off, but the mechanism is similar to regular pressure gauges.

I personally think they are more accurate than pencil types.

Just more of my 2 cents.
 

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great thanks im going to try one!
 

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How do you know?

Yep, that's the type. You can find similar at just about any auto parts store, and probably Tractor Supply too. They are a little bit more expensive than the pencil types, but some don't have a hold feature, or a bleed off, but the mechanism is similar to regular pressure gauges.

I personally think they are more accurate than pencil types.

Just more of my 2 cents.
I've got one that goes up to higher pressure for truck tires but it consistently reads lower than the pencil types. My question is if anyone has ever figured out a standard way to check a gauge? If I've got three gauges and each reads differently on the same tire, which one is correct? Heck, are any of them correct?

Treefarmer
 

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I've got one that goes up to higher pressure for truck tires but it consistently reads lower than the pencil types. My question is if anyone has ever figured out a standard way to check a gauge? If I've got three gauges and each reads differently on the same tire, which one is correct? Heck, are any of them correct?

Treefarmer
Just like any gauge, you can send them out to be calibrated, or at least checked for accuracy, but that will cost you $$. Where I work, we have annual calibration of all of our inspection gauges such as calipers, micrometers, coordinate measurement machines, etc. by an outside vendor using NBS traceable standards, yada yada. All instruments that pass get a "calibrated" sticker, those that don't either get a "for reference only" or go into the trash if they cannot be adjusted.

I just do it the old fashioned way for my tire gauges. First off, I have several bourdon type dial gauges that I compare against each other. If they are within a couple of psi of each other then I take the average and say that is the correct pressure. I then label (or try to remember) each gauge that is reading high/low by the difference. If any gauge is way off the average, I toss them. If none of my tire gauges read "close" to each other, I go out and buy another one and check again. (You really can't have too many tire gauges, because you probably can't find one when you really need it :laugh:).

Regarding pencil gauges, I've used a few (from friends) that the bar was so loose it always shot out to the end when your put it on the tire stem. I had to hold it on and push the stick back to get a good reading. Good friends usually got a free gift from me (a dial type gauge) after that. :laugh:

Tire gauges are like torque wrenches ... how do you know yours is reading right? ... I compare my torque wrenches the same way.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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I have the round dial type that I use the most, the cheap kind. If fluid is on the stem before checking I use the air nozzle on it. After checking and or adjusting the pressure, again I spray it off with air. Do the same with the dial. So far I haven't had any trouble. I also use water to spray off the tire and rim of any has leaked out.
 
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