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Hey there so I bought a used 1026R and came with a set of pallet forks I believe 48" but one is slightly bent sticks up about 2" higher than the other, kind of a pain in the butt. My question is has anyone ever tried to bend a fork back to its original position? I tried sticking it under something heavy and lift with tractor but no luck. My next attempt maybe throwing it into a fire until red hot then using a sledge hammer but was hoping there might be another way. Also does anyone know if you can buy just a single fork or do they come in pairs only? Thanks in advance.
 

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Hey there so I bought a used 1026R and came with a set of pallet forks I believe 48" but one is slightly bent sticks up about 2" higher than the other, kind of a pain in the butt. My question is has anyone ever tried to bend a fork back to its original position? I tried sticking it under something heavy and lift with tractor but no luck. My next attempt maybe throwing it into a fire until red hot then using a sledge hammer but was hoping there might be another way. Also does anyone know if you can buy just a single fork or do they come in pairs only? Thanks in advance.
I think your gonna have to get out the torch in order to bend it were you want it.
 

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Where is it bent? The upright? The elbow? or the Long section "fork"
Or is it a combination of all 3 areas?
Are these Solid Material?.....The Fork itself.
 

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A few options....

I'd take it to someone with a BIG press.

Are you sure the Fork Frame is not bent or Twisted??




Figuring OSHA is out of the equation and your lift is limited to 1000 lbs. or probly less.

Heat would work but generally not recomended. Forktruck/lift forks are heat treated.
Bend the other one to match.....Gonna stress your loader frame and lead to other issues.
If it will mount in your frame upside down...you may have some success...again stressing your loader frame /tractor ..etc
Possible to shim it at the mounts and gain a tiny bit.

I still vote ..Big Press
 

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A few options....

I'd take it to someone with a BIG press.

Are you sure the Fork Frame is not bent or Twisted??




Figuring OSHA is out of the equation and your lift is limited to 1000 lbs. or probly less.

Heat would work but generally not recomended. Forktruck/lift forks are heat treated.
Bend the other one to match.....Gonna stress your loader frame and lead to other issues.
If it will mount in your frame upside down...you may have some success...again stressing your loader frame /tractor ..etc
Possible to shim it at the mounts and gain a tiny bit.

I still vote ..Big Press
He has it on a 1 series so 700 lbs on a good day is about a 1 series can lift.

If you can't find someone with a big press, I would rent a Port-a-power (or even buy one, they are not too bad of a price at HF) and rig up a way to use it to straighten it out. I would be very careful if you try to straighten it while on the loader frame because that may cause more problems than it solves.
 

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I have straightened a bent fork,, twice,, I am not sure if it was the same side or not,, too long ago.

in my case, the fork was bent down,, and, yes, these are serious, thick, wide, real forklift forks,,



Since the bend was down, I wrapped a 3/8" chain around each end of the fork. The chain was tightened with a twist type binder.
Then I put a 20 ton bottle jack in the bend of the fork, and jacked the chain up,,

As the bottle jack "bends" the hypotenuse of the triangle,, the fork bends back up.



This is not for the weak of heart,, if that chain snaps,, something will happen,,, :dunno:

I place a moving pad over the chain while I am jacking the bottle jack.
At times, I would imagine that the chain possibly has 10X the stress in it of what the jack is exerting.
in other words, if the jack is creating 5 tons of lift, the pull in the chain is 50 tons.

That level of stress easily bends the fork.

Oh, both times I bent the fork, it was due to running into something.
This last time, I was trying to move a huge oak stump, that still had some roots attached. :flag_of_truce:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the info everyone I may try the bottle jack method have a few of those lying around, but now you guys have me guessing as to which one is actually bent. I have checked out the frame and it seems to be alright has to be the fork itself I assume. Thanks again
 

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Thanks for the info everyone I may try the bottle jack method have a few of those lying around, but now you guys have me guessing as to which one is actually bent. I have checked out the frame and it seems to be alright has to be the fork itself I assume. Thanks again


.....I think were all guessing the 1 thats bent is bent Down.

I can only think of a couple ways one could actually be bent UP and that would be ugly.

I'm guessing 9 outta 10 get bent down .

Perhaps you can do a forensic investigation of the mounts at the top and bottom of each fork as well as the frame and try to figure out what actually may have happened.

Keep us posted and Good Luck


Pics are always nice and may give some new insight to your issue....:cheers:
 

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Thanks for the info everyone I may try the bottle jack method have a few of those lying around, but now you guys have me guessing as to which one is actually bent. I have checked out the frame and it seems to be alright has to be the fork itself I assume. Thanks again
Thats dangerous. All you have to do is heat it and then it will bend easy. You will be amazed at how easy this works and then afterward you need to quench it to harden it back up. The bottle jack idea could lead to catastrophic failure of one or components which can result in injury as stuff flies about. Heat was how the fork was made not by press.
 

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I also guess the bent for is bent down. Take them both off and compare to each other. If they match your frame it bent.
You could also check them with a carpenter's square.
 

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Once you know it is a fork for certain, my vote would be to take them to a machine shop.

Shouldn't be much money and will be a lot quicker and safer.

My guess is they will be able to make them match much easier as well.
 
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