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I just got a 60" JD plow blade, looking for a rubber/UHMW replacement blade for it. I notice Artillian has some, but only 54" length.

Who and what material would be the way to go? I plow the cement pad, sidewalks on the house, and 1/4 mile gravel driveway.

Thanks
Dave
 
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In one of our threads ( don’t know where) there is a link to a place that sell 1” Plus thick conveyor belt. May wear faster but much cheaper and holes are pre drilled.
 
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In one of our threads ( don’t know where) there is a link to a place that sell 1” Plus thick conveyor belt. May wear faster but much cheaper and holes are pre drilled.

This place?

Rubber Wear Strip
 

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I went with a UHMW blade for my rear blade for snow removal. I purchased from United States Plastic Corp https://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=23217&catid=868 . Only down side to ordering from them is you have to order in 5' or 10' foot lengths and drill your own holes. They will cut the size you need and you just get the leftover part. I had them cut the 10' piece to 72" and then was left with a 48" piece. Not an issue because i have plans to use that for a chainsaw carrier. Main reason i went with them was to keep my color coordination in check and i needed a piece to be 6" wide which was the same size as the stock steel cutting edge. They have many sizes to choose from.
1217181716.jpg
 

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Like many others here, I used a "stall mat" from Tractor Supply. $40 for enough mat to make 8 wear strips.

I used it for the first time this weekend. Plowed everything 3 times during the snow event. My blacktop driveway is 10' wide and 342' long. I also have a concrete pad in front of my garage. It's 30'x80'. I can't really see any major wear on the rubber strip. It worked great, just like a squeegee.

The stall mat cuts with a sharp utility knife. I drew a line on the mat with a Sharpie and then freehanded the cut. Took about three passes to go all the way through. For the holes, I laid the steel cutting edge on top of the mat, marked the holes with the Sharpie and then used a 3/8" drill bit. No problemo! I did have to buy new, longer carriage bolts to accommodate the thickness of the stall mat. When I have to flip it due to wear, I figure it will be about a 5 minute job. I also cut and drilled 3 extra strips so if I have to swap the rubber multiple times during the season (which I doubt), I won't have to be in my unheated garage measuring, drilling, shivering, cussing, etc.
 

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Yes thanks CP that’s it
 

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Should you have any questions about the material I posted below, don't hesitate to send me a PM and I will respond and then come back and post on this thread as well. I don't always get back to the threads where I have posted, so I don't want someone who does post a question here to think I am ignoring them if I don't provide a timely response.

I just use the local Belt and Hose supplier, which is only 1.5 miles down the road. I get this material in 8' lengths and I don't recall the exact price, but it's less than $30. I am going to replace it tomorrow, but I got over 1,000 driveway plows out of it during the last year and through today. I also plow private asphalt roads which are 35' wide and I plow at least 800 feet of the road each time it snows, so I got a lot of wear out of it. Mine could still be used, but it's time as I have torn the end slightly plus it's starting to curl under from the plow weight sitting on it.

Plow Edge Squeegee Material Suggestions

If you are getting material on your own to do this, here are my suggestions;

1. No less than 3.5" tall as you want at least 2" below the blade edge and enough material under the strap to hold it securely and not tear.

2. No less than 1/2" "thick" as it might tear with down pressure if its not a belt type product.

3. Personally, I tried the belt type product and like the smooth edge material better. The belt material seemed to "roll and bend" and it flexed too easily with down pressure. The belt tended to wear less even for some reason and it had threads or something else hanging off of it as it wore which looked like it needed a shave...:laugh:

4. Note, I use baler belt for my plow top flap, pictured below, and that seems to have the ideal amount of flex for the top flap, BUT only when I doubled it up and riveted the two strips together. Otherwise, in the single strip, the snow would push the flap straight up and act like a snow pusher. That's not why it's 0n the plow. It's designed to roll snow off the end of the plow when angled.

I want the snow to roll off the end of the plow, ideally higher than the plow blade height. It does this when I am plowing down the road in high gear at nearly WOT. It's the perfect way to throw the snow as far onto the bank as possible when plowing with the blade angled.

My plow's top flap is made of baler belts material I bought at TSC. The plow top flap is also an outstanding accompaniment to your plow and something every plow should have. Especially, the 54" plows as they are narrow enough that without the top flap, the material spills over the top of the plow onto the hitch. Then it can cause ice issues which impede the angling of the plow and can even damage the angle cylinder hydraulic line and coupling and cause hydraulic leaks. The top flap for the plow makes it work so much better. It increases plow volume, plowing efficiency, etc.

If you want any dimensions for a top flap, I can measure mine and post them. You will need to drill the top edge of the plow to secure it which isn't difficult if you have good drill bits. If you add a top flap, I suggest you also add the plow markers as once the top flap is on, you can't see the top of the plow exactly as before so the plow markers help you position the plow closer to the doors for back dragging, etc. Also, the top flap provides a buffer to help preventing getting the plow blade too close to overhead door, etc. So the top flap and the markers really are very helpful.

5. It's really very helpful to have the rubber edge extended past each end of the blade about 3" to 4", but no more than that.So if you are cutting it for a 60" blade, make it 66" or 68" long and allow 3" or 4" on each end.

6. Don't use More than 3" or 4" over hang on each end and it can result in the rubber tearing when you apply too much down pressure when back dragging without support to hold the extensions. Having this extension helps back drag from door openings and the rubber sticking out prevents you from having the steel blade end up against the wooden door jamb, etc. It cleans the door opening better and won't damage anything. :good2:

7. Use your "strap" or even the steel blade you remove as the template for drilling the new material.

8. Over drill the size of the hole by one or two drill sizes you actually need in the rubber as some material has a tendency to expand when drilling it and then contract and you can't get the bolt through it easily if you drill the exact same size as the bolt.

Hardware Suggestions

A. Use soft bolts so you can break them off when replacing them. The threads and the nuts will be corroded anyways so don't waste your time trying to take them apart to reuse them. Break them off, throw them out and use new hardware. It's much quicker.

B. I never use carriage bolts as they can spin and you can't get a hold of them to remove them easily. I used to use carriage bolts as the plow was cut out to hold them, but I fought with too many over the years and never again. Plus not many people keep extra carriage bolts in their bolt bins which meant a trip to the hardware store.

C. Have the excess bolt protrude on the front of the plow, not the back of the plow, as it can wear the bolt and make them very tough to remove. As you compress the rubber, you need some excess to hold it correctly. Just use bolts which will be easy to snap off to replace them. I just use my impact wrench and snap each bolt off and then drop the strap and edge much easier and faster.

D. Use large diameter or even fender washers to spread the load of the bolt, on both ends of the bolt if needed when assembling.

E. Always use NYLOCK nuts to secure them and they won't come apart. Have the nuts on the FRONT of the plow where the extra bolt length is as well, as they can get worn depending upon plow angle,etc and be tough to get a socket or wrench on.

F. You don't need massive diameter bolts to hold the strap and rubber edge. My plow uses 5/16th's bolts to hold the strap and squeegee. I specifically used this size instead of something larger so they would be easier to get off each time. It's tough to snap off a 1/2" bolt to replace them and you want the smallest size which will hold if you have to chisel them off or cut them off with a heat wrench, etc.

G. If you don't have NYLOCK nuts, double nut them and use lock washers. But I would suggest picking up a box of NYLOCKS at the hardware to fit your plow bolts.

H. There is something about NYLOCK bolts which have been on for awhile if you run them on and off fast with an impact, it tends to screw up the nut threads, which is another reason why I just plan on new hardware each time I replace the edge.

Regarding the Edge Wear, how long should the rubber edge last?

If you are using material either designed for the edge or material like I have pictured, it should last a very long time. In fact, unless you use way too much down pressure on the plow, it should last many years. I always have a spare edge on hand and in fact, I take the edge I am getting ready to install with me to the rubber place and show them the material and tell them I need either 8' or 16' of it (my plow is 87" wide plus 4" of overhang on each end makes it 95" long which I just buy 96").

Since I plow for others in my neighborhood, I don't want to be down waiting for something which Is why I always have the spare squeegee on hand. I once caught a new rubber edge just shortly after I installed it, on a metal landscape material spike on the edge of the driveway and damaged it where it was leaving this little trail of snow from the edge being "nicked" about 1/2". I didn't like the little line of snow in the same spot so I replaced it. Otherwise, I usually get 1,000 driveway plows or more out of each edge (22 to 24 driveways and last year I plowed each driveway 45 times, which comes right up to the 1,000 driveway total number, not including the private road plowed).

Final thoughts

- If you are using so much down pressure you are noticing wear on your edge the first few months of use, you likely have too much down pressure or too soft a material.

- You want the rubber edge material to flex slightly. One of the great advantages of using the rubber plow squeegee is pushing stone and gravel off the lawn and back where it belongs in the spring. If done carefully, it doesn't harm the grass and also saves you a lot of time raking gravel.

- I personally don't use plow shoes and they are no longer even on my plow. The downside is there is no way to stand your plow up without the shoes and also, you want to store the plow for the summer as described below to get the most life out of your plow edge.

- I also don't use the float control on the loader. I watch how much pressure I am putting down on the edge and adjust accordingly. Once you get used to this, its a muscle memory and easily repeated.


- I wouldn't plow with any other edge on my plow. It gets the pavement nice and clean and allows the sun to keep the ice, etc. off the surface.

- When I store my plow in the spring, I lay it face down so the weight isn't on the edge all spring, summer and fall. Or if you have plow shoes. extend the shoes down so the plow is resting on the shoes and not the plow edge as it will deform it over time.



Then plow away..............:good2:





 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank You everyone. Some very good info here.

I know there are some mining operations around here, need to look around. TSC just a ways down the road as well. Not too much for snow around here this year so far, may become a summer project.

Dave
 
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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Sulley, is this the Baler Belt material you were talking about? https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/wcco-belting-baler-belting-2-ply-4-in-x-60-in

I see this for stall mat. https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/4-ft-x-6-ft-x-3-4-in-thick-rubber-stall-mat?cm_vc=IOPDP1

I kinda think the conveyor material may be better? Rubber Wear Strip I think the 60" x 5 1/2" would be the way to go to be able to flip it over when it wears down?

One thing I need to look at again, I think my new 60" blade does not have ribbons. Just the blade bolted to the mould board?

Have to look in the morning.

Thanks
Dave
 

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Dave if you are referring to a solid “bar” across the blade to hold something on it, I just used the biggest fender washers I could find and seems to work fine.
For my back blade I got the conveyor belt stuff, they did a great job and made a custom one for me, no issues
 
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Sulley, is this the Baler Belt material you were talking about? https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/wcco-belting-baler-belting-2-ply-4-in-x-60-in

I see this for stall mat. https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/4-ft-x-6-ft-x-3-4-in-thick-rubber-stall-mat?cm_vc=IOPDP1

I kinda think the conveyor material may be better? Rubber Wear Strip I think the 60" x 5 1/2" would be the way to go to be able to flip it over when it wears down?

One thing I need to look at again, I think my new 60" blade does not have ribbons. Just the blade bolted to the mould board?

Have to look in the morning.

Thanks
Dave
I'm not sure what Sully's method of browsing the forum is, but he's mentioned a few times lately that he doesn't always return to threads where he posts, so I'll chime in on your links.

The "Stall Mat" link is for the correct thing that many (including myself) have posted about using for a rubber edge. If you buy it, just beware that it is heavy. It was all that I and the TSC sales girl (who looked pretty tough!) could do to load it in the back of my truck. When I got it home, I draped it over my forks to unload and handle it. If you don't have help and/or a truck, you could probably cut it lengthwise at TSC before loading it in your vehicle.

The "rubberwearstrip.com" link is one that other folks have used for the edge. That material probably would hold up better than the stall mat. I'm sure it's reinforced and it's also designed to be used in industrial environments rather than to just have livestock stand on it. I would have probably ordered this myself, but bought the stall mat before I saw anyone else using it.

You're on the right track for the "Baler Belt", but you want something wider than 4". You'll want at least 6" and probably 8". I think that Sully mentioned somewhere that he actually doubled the baler belt on his blade - using 2 pieces riveted together. I'm pretty sure that TSC carries the wider belt, but it is expensive.

You might be able to find the baler belt at your JD dealer if they service big combines. Somewhere on my super-messy desk I have a business card for a company in Texas that sells it. I talked to their main sales guy at the Farm Machinery Show in Louisville last February. If I find the card, I'll post back up here.

Finally, what do you mean by "I think my new 60" blade does not have ribbons"? What are ribbons?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Mark, the "ribbon" is a second strip of flatbar that is drill same as the cutting edge. Seems a lot of older blades have these, while it seems the new JD 60" may just have the edge bolted to the mould board.

Yes, I just looked, the cutting edge is mounted directly to the mould board. I will order some of the conveyor belt today, friend has a metal worker, I'll lay out a piece of flatbar and have him punch the holes out.

Thank you everyone for the help.
Dave
 
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I don't think you'll need a second piece of flat bar if you're going the conveyor belt route. Take a look at my setup...

20190108_170520_resized.jpg

The black bar is my cutting edge. It would normally hang down about an inch below the bottom of the plow itself. So, yes, there is about 1.75-2.00 inches "unsupported" behind the steel cutting edge, but I haven't seen any issue with that. (And I'm just using stall mat - the conveyor belt will probably hold up even better) I might have missed it, but I can't really recall anyone saying that they cut a second piece of steel to use in one of these setups.

I wish I had a better "side shot" close up of how this is mounted. I tried to get one the day I took this pic, but my stupid phone was acting up and kept rebooting when I was taking close ups. Not sure what was up with that. Next time I have the tractor out, I'll try again to get a better shot.

EDIT - If you click on the picture, you should be able to open up the full size image and then zoom in on the cutting edge. Not sure if you're using a phone or a computer to read GTT.
 

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Dave and others, I have been plowing more snow than ever since switching from the blower to the front blade this year. I used the TSC stall mat for my edge. I did the same for my 3PH rear blade years ago and I have never had to flip it. As of right now, I'm not happy with the wear of the stall mat on a front mounted blade. I'm sure it has to do with the curvature of the blade and the direction of plowing/travel. With my rear blade, the rubber edge has always (99% of the time) been used in reverse with the edge going "with the pavement", back dragging if you will. On the front plow, travel is of course forward, but the edge is being pushed "against the pavement". Make sense? I will be trying one of the other types of rubber edges that have been mentioned in some of the threads currently active here, next year. Just my two cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I just ordered the conveyor belt scraper. I'll probably be doing the top belt this summer.
 

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Dave and others, I have been plowing more snow than ever since switching from the blower to the front blade this year. I used the TSC stall mat for my edge. I did the same for my 3PH rear blade years ago and I have never had to flip it. As of right now, I'm not happy with the wear of the stall mat on a front mounted blade. I'm sure it has to do with the curvature of the blade and the direction of plowing/travel. With my rear blade, the rubber edge has always (99% of the time) been used in reverse with the edge going "with the pavement", back dragging if you will. On the front plow, travel is of course forward, but the edge is being pushed "against the pavement". Make sense? I will be trying one of the other types of rubber edges that have been mentioned in some of the threads currently active here, next year. Just my two cents.
Even my doubled up High Density Poly strips wear fast on my snow pusher blade. I took the skies off and it works way better now the strips make good contact to the ground. When pushing snow and the blade down tight I wear them fast and the side ones corners are now rounded a little. I only have the stuff on for froze rocks tearing up my blade and they save my Loader and tractor from bad damage plowing. 95% of my plowing is done with the rear blade steel to the ground. I have been using it for many years now and the cutter edge just shows a little wear but not time to flip it over. Might do that on a big road/grading project just to have it new again and strait all the way across. Nice part about the steel edge it does not wear out fast and once I have plowed over the driveway there is a snow seal on the gravel so it does not matter the steel does not get into it! My Rubber Edge is just to protect my tractor from damage using the loader to push snow. Drifting1.jpg Snow.jpg Drifting 2.jpg DSCF3648 (800x597).jpg
 

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Sulley, is this the Baler Belt material you were talking about? https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/wcco-belting-baler-belting-2-ply-4-in-x-60-in

Thanks
Dave
I'm not sure what Sully's method of browsing the forum is, but he's mentioned a few times lately that he doesn't always return to threads where he posts, so I'll chime in on your links.

You're on the right track for the "Baler Belt", but you want something wider than 4". You'll want at least 6" and probably 8". I think that Sully mentioned somewhere that he actually doubled the baler belt on his blade - using 2 pieces riveted together. I'm pretty sure that TSC carries the wider belt, but it is expensive.

You might be able to find the baler belt at your JD dealer if they service big combines. Somewhere on my super-messy desk I have a business card for a company in Texas that sells it. I talked to their main sales guy at the Farm Machinery Show in Louisville last February. If I find the card, I'll post back up here.

Finally, what do you mean by "I think my new 60" blade does not have ribbons"? What are ribbons?
Mark, the "ribbon" is a second strip of flatbar that is drill same as the cutting edge. Seems a lot of older blades have these, while it seems the new JD 60" may just have the edge bolted to the mould board.

Yes, I just looked, the cutting edge is mounted directly to the mould board. I will order some of the conveyor belt today, friend has a metal worker, I'll lay out a piece of flatbar and have him punch the holes out.

Thank you everyone for the help.
Dave
Please note, My comments and suggested material dimensions for the plow top flap and the rubber squeegee edge are for those using either the 54" or 60" Yellow Blade on their Deere tractors including those who have added the Superior Tech plow extensions to get the plow out to 72" in width. Because of the plows shape and weight as well as the curve in the moldboard and it's actual height, the following seems to work best based on a lot of trial and error. If you are using a plow which is taller or has a deeper curve, you may need to alter the dimensions for your top flap to make it work the best for you.

Top Flap Material Dimensions
I just went and measured the baler belt I used and it's either 3/16th's or 1/4" thick, I can't tell for sure. Mark was right about several things he mentioned regarding my prior comments (actually, I think he was right about every one of them..:laugh: He must pay attention, I will make sure he gets a good grade on this class....:lol:...) I did double it up and it's now 1/2" thick (approx) and it is also 7" wide from front to back.

The top flap piece on my plow is one continuous piece and it's 90" long, then double thickness, so I don't think its the same as the material link you provided. It's critical the top flap material piece is one continuous piece or the joint of two pieces will change how the top flap works and that's something to avoid. I made that mistake in one of my earlier top flap attempts.

I do know that 7" is the minimum width I would want and 8" would also likely work fine. Based upon the way the flap functions, I don't see any reason to be any wider and it's rolling the snow forward or off the end of the plow at 7", the extra width probably wouldn't make it work much different. So if you stay in the 7" to 8" wide range and 1/2" thick, you should be in the right category for the flexibility that seems to work the best in my humble opinion......well, maybe I am not THAT humble....:laugh:

Sourcing the Material Based upon Pliability and size
I did double up the thickness of the flap material as at 3/16th's or 1/4", the flap would stand straight up and just hold the snow. At double the thickness, or 1/2", it functions just as I want it to. You could probably go 5/8th of an inch in thickness and be ok, but beyond that I would think is going to be too stiff. I don't see any reason you couldn't source the material as scrap if it's in the size range.

As far as the "pliability" of my top flap, I can fold it with two hands to about a 90 degree angle, but no more, so that tells you roughly how stiff you want it to be for flexing and working. It shouldn't be so you can fold it easily, it requires some effort, but it's not "difficult" to make it bend. Please note, it won't bend more than about 90 degrees when the edge is mounted, which when mounted to the top of the plow, would mean it would be standing nearly straight up with the full force against it. You definitely do NOT want it to go further back or it's going to dump snow over the top of the plow, which you want to avoid for several reasons including, it's messy, it freezes the hitch and breaks angle cylinder fittings, it requires more clean up for starters.

I mentioned somewhere else recently that I have seen plow top flaps where they are using material 1" thick or more. That's not the way I want it to work. Yes, it would hold the snow, but the wider the plow, the deeper the snow, the greater the weight and pretty soon you have a snow pusher instead of a snow plow which can angle roll the snow to keep moving forward. This leads to traction problems, steering problems and it's best to avoid both of those.

There is no doubt that the way I have done it isn't the only way, however, I have spent a great deal of time finding what works and what doesn't so my experiences shouldn't be discounted entirely.

The Squeegee and Top Flap really Transform the Plow
It's truly amazing to me how the rubber plow squeegee edge and the top flap completely transform the plow. I have a 54" new plow which I have used once or twice and the difference in plowing snow 6" deep or more between the plow without the top flap and the plow with the top flap is really significant. Then when I use my big plow, which is on my tractor 99.89% of the time, the times when I did switch back to the 54" plow from the plow 87" wide, I couldn't believe how it changed the experience and the time it takes me to get the driveways plowed.

For my uses, the difference between using the 54" plow without the top flap and my large 87" plow with the top flap, it doubles the time it takes me to plow the driveways and the sections of road which I have on my plow route. When I spend 2.5 to 3.5 hours with the big plow, that means the same number of drives took me 5 to 7 hours. That's a LONG TIME to be working on one of these SCUT tractors, especially when on some days, I had to plow twice a day. The amount of clean up without the top flap and less width to work with make a huge difference.

Plow Shoes when using the Rubber Plow Edge
I also mentioned and Mark correctly also indicated elsewhere, that with the rubber plow edge, I do not use plow shoes at all on my plow. Really, the edge carries the weight of the plow, which avoids the shoes marring the pavement and it also allows me to control the down pressure I put on the plow on the rubber edge. With the shoes on, as the driveway pitch and angles vary, the rubber edge can end up floating off the driveway and leaving areas not swept clean.

For me, the primary disadvantage of not having the plow shoes is the plow won't stand up on its own when removed from the tractor. Beyond that, I really have no use for the shoes any longer as the rubber edge works the best for me without the shoes on the plow.

You can certainly leave the shoes on your plow or pusher, just adjust them so they are barely off the ground when the plow is sitting squarely on the rubber squeegee. As the rubber wears, you might need to move the shoes up or down a washer or two in adjustment or a hole or two in the plow, depending upon the style of the shoes used.

Securing the Top Flap to the Plow Top Edge
If you have a friend who can easily cut and drill the strap material for the plow squeegee edge, I would use the same narrow metal strip, and I would cut it to match the size of the top lip on the plow. Much more width and it's going to alter the flap bending characteristics.

You don't want to have the mounting holes right along the edge of the material or it can tear, which is what I found on some of my earlier trial and error. The actual amount of flap extending from the front edge of the mounting surface is 5.75", which is why the material at a total width of 7" to 8" should give you the amount of flap to work well. You need just enough overhanging the rear of the plow top edge to prevent the holes from being too close to the edge of the flap.

I have mounting bolts about every 10" across the top of the flap. You also should double the bolts up at each end, about 1.5" apart, with the outside end bolt being set in about 1" from the end of the top edge, as the flap has a lot of pressure on it when you are rolling deep snow from the end of the angled plow. When I tore the flap around the mounting hole in earlier versions, it was the end bolts which tore first.

If you don't have a source to make the strap, then use fender washers and maybe double them up unless they are 1/8"thick as you are trying to spread out the clamping force of the bolts on the top edge, which Is why I suggest the strap material. A strap provides a nice smooth top edge on the flap and takes out the ripple look which my top flap has using just bolts and washers.

When I redo the top flap with a single layer of material, I am going to use the strap to secure it across the plow edge as it looks nicer and takes the "wavy" look of the top flap away. The flap bolts at 1/4" in diameter and enough length to secure the flap is all you need, nothing fancy.

Hope this information is helpful. Let me know if you have any other questions. SB
 

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Baler Belting

Here is a search for Baler Belting by the foot. Different thicknesses and custom length. I bough a 6 ft piece for my Power Wagon Bed at North 40 near us. You can buy it on line. https://www.google.com/search?q=baler+belting+by+the+foot&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjhtL7Hn4fgAhXPGDQIHdUqBY0Q_AUIDygC&biw=1120&bih=602

I have found a hole punch works good for the holes. I tried drilling them but it is not a clean hole. So I cheaped out took a 3/8"-1/2"" Pipe and sharpened it on one end. Then hit it with a hammer to punch it thru the material. You can use a harden bolt too and just lay the material on a piece of steel and pound on the bolt to crush/smash a round hole then clean it up with a drill bit.

Here is a bunch more and nice prices, wider and thicker. https://www.google.com/search?q=thick+rubber+belting&source=lnms&tbm=shop&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiOoov9pIfgAhXAJTQIHSm1CsoQ_AUIDigB&biw=1120&bih=602
 
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