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I'm looking at adding a 3 point straight blade (AKA, scrape blade) to my implement arsenal, but I'm debating on what size to look at.

I'm finding all kinds of used 6' blades locally, but I'm wondering if I wouldn't be better off with a 5'. Not having used one or access to one to borrow to play with, I figured you knowledgeable folks might have some input.

I'm mainly going to be using it for grading on our place. I realize a box blade may be a better option for that kind of work, but I don't see paying 2x or more as much, plus the straight blades have the ability to pivot and I can use it to clear snow when the occasion arises.

Appreciate any helpful info!

In case there's any other terms that might be used and to clarify, this is what I'm looking at....

LS-05-SCMP-SBLADE-2T.jpg
 

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I'm looking at adding a 3 point straight blade (AKA, scrape blade) to my implement arsenal, but I'm debating on what size to look at.

I'm finding all kinds of used 6' blades locally, but I'm wondering if I wouldn't be better off with a 5'. Not having used one or access to one to borrow to play with, I figured you knowledgeable folks might have some input.

I'm mainly going to be using it for grading on our place. I realize a box blade may be a better option for that kind of work, but I don't see paying 2x or more as much, plus the straight blades have the ability to pivot and I can use it to clear snow when the occasion arises.

Appreciate any helpful info!

In case there's any other terms that might be used and to clarify, this is what I'm looking at....

View attachment 574881
I my opinion, you would be fine with 6'. I want mine wider than my wheel tracks even when angled.
I use a 7' on my 2032 just for that reason.
 

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If I could only own one it would be the rear blade which I use way more then the box blade which is still needed/used. I have a 8 ft blade on my 4044M that way it is wider then the wheel base angled and I can then cut snow wider on each pass with out driving on the berm if I want to. Glad I went big for grading and moving snow.
 

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For heavy dirt work I’m going to say 54”. Any bigger and all you will get a lot of wheel spin with a 10xx.
 

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Also keep in mind if you want to spin the blade around to push with it while you are backing or backblade driving forward, if it's too wide you won't be able to clear the back tires when you try to rotate it into the desired position.
 

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Everybody is giving you great advice that I agree with. Personally, I have a 5' rear blade on my 1026R. I use it for snow duty, so far no dirt work....so far. I think the 5' is a good size. You might have to take smaller bites with dirt work, but it does spin completely around, so that is a plus.
 

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Everybody is giving you great advice that I agree with. Personally, I have a 5' rear blade on my 1026R. I use it for snow duty, so far no dirt work....so far. I think the 5' is a good size. You might have to take smaller bites with dirt work, but it does spin completely around, so that is a plus.
I'm going to second the recommendation for a 5-foot blade. True, when the snow is light and fluffy you would have no problems working with a 6-footer but with heavy wet snow or ice you can have a hard time getting enough traction to get the longer blade through the snow. Notice I said traction. The 1025R has plenty of engine HP for a larger blade but keeping the tires hooked up with the ground is the biggest challenge.

I initially had a 6-foot blade on my 2720 and ended up swapping for a 5-footer. BTW - my 6-foot blade spun 360 degrees no problem. Yes, it just barely covers the rear wheels but I have had conditions where I couldn't pull or push even the 5-footer with all the tires spinning - and I have chains on all four tires and liquid filled rear tires.

I also like the maneuverability of the shorter blade as I have some tight spots I need to work with. I have a 54" snow blower on the front but 90% of my snow clearing work ends up being with the blade lately.
 

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I'm going to second the recommendation for a 5-foot blade. True, when the snow is light and fluffy you would have no problems working with a 6-footer but with heavy wet snow or ice you can have a hard time getting enough traction to get the longer blade through the snow. Notice I said traction. The 1025R has plenty of engine HP for a larger blade but keeping the tires hooked up with the ground is the biggest challenge.

I initially had a 6-foot blade on my 2720 and ended up swapping for a 5-footer. BTW - my 6-foot blade spun 360 degrees no problem. Yes, it just barely covers the rear wheels but I have had conditions where I couldn't pull or push even the 5-footer with all the tires spinning - and I have chains on all four tires and liquid filled rear tires.

I also like the maneuverability of the shorter blade as I have some tight spots I need to work with. I have a 54" snow blower on the front but 90% of my snow clearing work ends up being with the blade lately.


Well said, and I agree about the 5' being better in tight quarters. I have been using my rear blade more in this weather too with the heavier, wet snow. Actually, that's why I have been nursing a sore back since Saturday.....I turned around quickly in the seat as I was blading off the driveway to see where I was going, and out went my back.:banghead:
 

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I'm going to second the recommendation for a 5-foot blade. True, when the snow is light and fluffy you would have no problems working with a 6-footer but with heavy wet snow or ice you can have a hard time getting enough traction to get the longer blade through the snow. Notice I said traction. The 1025R has plenty of engine HP for a larger blade but keeping the tires hooked up with the ground is the biggest challenge.

I initially had a 6-foot blade on my 2720 and ended up swapping for a 5-footer. BTW - my 6-foot blade spun 360 degrees no problem. Yes, it just barely covers the rear wheels but I have had conditions where I couldn't pull or push even the 5-footer with all the tires spinning - and I have chains on all four tires and liquid filled rear tires.

I also like the maneuverability of the shorter blade as I have some tight spots I need to work with. I have a 54" snow blower on the front but 90% of my snow clearing work ends up being with the blade lately.
I agree with Jay on this, a 5 footer is definitely better for a 1 series IMO, but I also work in tight spaces with mine so the 5' works much better for that as well.
 

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I agree with Jay on this, a 5 footer is definitely better for a 1 series IMO, but I also work in tight spaces with mine so the 5' works much better for that as well.
To be honest... I kind of feel silly as all my advice was based on snow use and I see the OP was primarily interested in grading. :banghead:

The good news is the recommendation for a shorter 5-foot blade is probably even more applicable for dirt work with a 1-series.
 

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Just typing based on personal experiences. A straight blade does great for pushing snow and does great in loose soil/gravel, however on a small tractor without downforce the blades lack in ability for grading compacted materials. Maybe the op is well aware of what he's buying but I would hate to see someone spend the money to purchase an implement with intentions of moving the earth to discover the only thing they can move is snow and loose gravel. They just don't have any weight to them and on compacted ground they have the tendency to bounce around. Perhaps a tooth bar for the loader bucket and a straight blade would put a person in business to do some work with a straight blade.
 

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Back Blade

I've got a 72" Woods bought at an equipment auction. IMHO, anything smaller for snow work since you need that width when running at an angle to roll the snow to cover the wheel tracks. My SIL borrowed last summer to grade his lengthy gravel drive and was shocked to find that he could roll gravel over the top when grading with his 1025R. It helps that the Woods is a nice heavy unit with both angle and tilt which helps it take a nice bite. I nearly bought smaller and am very glad that I resisted the impulse. Using in dirt might well be different since the larger back blade could easily stop a subcompact. However, for snow, the 6 footer is just right.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Just typing based on personal experiences. A straight blade does great for pushing snow and does great in loose soil/gravel, however on a small tractor without downforce the blades lack in ability for grading compacted materials. Maybe the op is well aware of what he's buying but I would hate to see someone spend the money to purchase an implement with intentions of moving the earth to discover the only thing they can move is snow and loose gravel. They just don't have any weight to them and on compacted ground they have the tendency to bounce around. Perhaps a tooth bar for the loader bucket and a straight blade would put a person in business to do some work with a straight blade.
I appreciate you covering the bases. I'm not looking to grade compacted dirt/gravel, just smoothing and leveling. I do have a toothbar, plow, disk, and landscape rake to do a lot of the work I've already done and will do, I just want the ability to do a bit more as far as grading and all.



I appreciate all the comments! Certainly gives me some things to think about. I knew I could flip most to push in reverse, but I hadn't considered the aspect of clearance to allow it to swing.
 

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To be honest... I kind of feel silly as all my advice was based on snow use and I see the OP was primarily interested in grading. :banghead:

The good news is the recommendation for a shorter 5-foot blade is probably even more applicable for dirt work with a 1-series.
Yes it is, and that is what I was basing my input on, I've never used mine for snow, only dirt.
 
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I've run both 5' and 6' on my 1026R (loaded tires). I had a 5' blade for a couple years and then traded up to a 6' blade, but that's because I solely use it for snow. With a 30deg angle you lose about 10" of effective width and I wanted 6" of "reach" on either side for sanity and cleaner turning while plowing. It works great on up to 9" of heavy VA snow, especially with the addition of a blade covering I'll talk about later.

I also wanted, however, to give the advice I wish I'd gotten when chosing my tractor: If I had it all to do again and just wanted snow handling, dirt grooming, and driveway maintenance... then I would just get a land plane and front blade.

For grading your drive (and I tried them all: rear blade, box blade, and land plane) you will get 50x the results at 1/10th the effort with a land plane. You don't want to reset the grade on your drive, even accidentally. You don't have the wheelbase, weight, or top-n-tilt to do that well in a timely manner. What you need to do, many times over the years, is groom the surface, churn the mix, and maybe massage some material from the outside in or gently from one side to another. A land plane is perfect for this and wont ever create the ruts, bumps, divots, and waffles that a rear blade will on a short wheelbase tractor with sub-awesome driver.

For snow on our size tractor a rear blade is only fine, but not great, because it doesn't work well on repeated or deep snows (>9"). For repeated storms you walk into the problem that it won't throw/push snow over the existing berm along the side of the drive, and for deep snows you run into the problem that your tractor is busy getting stuck in the snow it's driving over before you get a chance to clear it. A front blade fixes all that. You can raise it to push snow up and over any berm. You can also just take the top off a long stretch of snowy road and then come back for the last 9". It's just much nicer, and will be my next purchase. (6' front blade, hydro angle, thinking CTA).

Promised pipe modification of rear blade for snow:
One thing that works wonders for snow if you are going to use a rear blade on gravel: Cut a slit on a section of 2" pipe that is the width of your blade and then set the blade into the pipe through the slit. You've effectively made a "shoe" for the entire length of the blade and that pretty much solves the problem of moving gravel (if your drive is flat and maintained). You can weld two little tabs near either end of the pipe in order to attach to the bolts that hold the cutting edge onto the moldboard. It only takes 5min to add/remove the pipe from your blade and works great. Following is a couple pictures of a blade setup like that...

Best of luck =)

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I have a 1025 and use a 5' box blade for nearly all of my grading.
I also have a 6' rear blade for snow and smoothing of the graded dirt.
My 6' will still turn 360° without hitting the tires but it is close.

Watch the ads. I paid $300 for my (used) box blade.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I have a 1025 and use a 5' box blade for nearly all of my grading.
I also have a 6' rear blade for snow and smoothing of the graded dirt.
My 6' will still turn 360° without hitting the tires but it is close.

Watch the ads. I paid $300 for my (used) box blade.
I'm in that patient watching mode now. I've seen some rough ones for $100 or so, but trying to find a decent deal on something in a bit better condition than some of them I'm seeing. Also something I can use or easily mod for my imatch.
 

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OP, I think you'll be much happier with either a box blade, or a land plane. As has been mentioned, our tractors lack weight, and the three-point on our tractors don't have down-pressure in the hydraulics to make up for it.
 
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