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I am working on clearing some shooting lanes on my property for deer hunting, and i would like to kill the stumps from the larger trees that i am cutting down that i cannot pull out with my tractor. I have a 3025e so i am not able to pull up anything large. Most, if not all in some sections, of the trees are pine. Some of the stumps are rather large, probably 8-12 inches in diameter. I do not want to dig any of them out right now, so renting a mini excavator is not an option. I heard that there are herbicides that are made to kill stumps so that they will rot faster. Do these actually work? Will regular weed killer work?
This is the product i use to control weeds around the house and gravel driveway. FarmWorks Grass Weed Killer 41% Glyphosate Concentrate, 2-1/2 gal., 76200 at Tractor Supply Co.
Could i apply this to the stump to kill it faster? or is that just for the green part of grass and weeds?

I want the stumps to rot because i want to be able to use my rotary cutter to keep the lanes clear and not worry about hitting a large stump.

Thanks for any tips.
 

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The glyphosate you linked will work just fine. But there is a key to the application.

You must spray the stump within 30 minutes after cutting.

What happens is - when you cut the tree it automatically starts drawing it’s nutrients down into the root system as a matter of defense. When you spray it right away it will draw the glyphosate down and kill it.

However, I don’t think it will have the effect you are looking for. When you cut a tree down it is essentially dead. You can’t kill it further.

I will spray stumps for stuff like multiflora rose and wild blackberry - nasty stuff. If you cut it off at the stump it will grow back quickly - or grow back from shoots that originate from the roots. By spraying them it kills the roots and prevents any regrowth.

I don’t know of anything that will make a stump rot faster once cut.
 

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I had to cut some pines year before last. I didn't have a backhoe then, so I cut the stump as close to the ground as possible and left it to rot. None of the stumps sprouted new growth. I'm not sure, but I don't think pines will re-grow off the stump. Maybe I'm wrong, but someone will correct me.
 

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However, I don’t think it will have the effect you are looking for. When you cut a tree down it is essentially dead. You can’t kill it further.

I.
That is not what my Virginia State forester says,,

I cut 30+ acres of timber, he told me the best re-population of the land will come from sprouts off the cut stumps.

He also said I have over a 1,000 seeds per square yard in the soil, those trees will possibly sprout, but will soon be shadowed out by the trees growing out of the cut stumps.

I have some stumps that must have over 50 sprouts growing out of it,, it will be interesting to watch and see which tree matures,,,:dunno:
 

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Try Pool Salt

I cut a couple dozen mimosa trees a while back and missed the 30 minute treatment window Coaltrain mentioned. I didn't want to buy expensive stump killer liquids for that many trees. Sprouts were terrible -- mimosas are very, very stubborn. This year, I cut deep notches in both the new and old stumps with my chainsaw and filled them with pool salt ($6.50 per 40 pound bag) -- No sprouts at all! This approach won't promote rotting, but it handily beat Roundup, industrial bleach, and everything else 'economical' I tried.
 

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This year, I cut deep notches in both the new and old stumps with my chainsaw and filled them with pool salt ($6.50 per 40 pound bag) -- No sprouts at all! This approach won't promote rotting, but it handily beat Roundup, industrial bleach, and everything else 'economical' I tried.
I didn't do the salt but I cut deep notches in a couple trees I took down (pine) that were along the property line. They were pretty dead though so they were starting to rot already. While I had an excavator take out the stumps of the healthy Ash trees we cut down, that was on our build site and there was no concern about underground utilities. The pines are pretty close to the gas line and I didn't bother with doing a locate. I ended up taking much of the fill from the excavation over to this area and buried the stumps that were flush cut with the ground anyhow. I wanted to bring in dirt as the remaining trees had the roots exposed and I would hit them with the mower.

My understanding is cutting the * in the stump helps pool water which will promote breaking down the tree. Before I went through burying them, after a rain I did see water sitting in the cuts.
 

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I tried one of the products (powder) that you drill some holes in the stump, add powder then water and it’s supposed to rot in 4-6 weeks. It did’nt do a thing.
 

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Tordon specifically targets "woody plants". Stumps, honeysuckle, etc.

yep its now a common product and easy to get at most farm stores.....i got the tip years ago from a guy who cleared and built trails in the forest.....comes in a quart squeeze bottle with a pop top with small holes....cut the tree or sprout squirt it round the growth ring (its died blue so its easy to see) .....and walk away .....seems like a bottle lasts forever (still on my first bottle ~10yrs) ...does the job..


i cant imagine trying to put salt or other home remedies on sprouts etc..:banghead:
 

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Pine not an issue

Pine will seldom, if ever sprout from a stump so you really don't need to treat it. Hardwoods will sprout and do need to be treated. Glyphosate will work and as mentioned, treat immediately after cutting. Tordon is really good and especially if it's mixed with diesel or kerosene rather than water.

In a couple of years the pine will start to rot without anything extra done to it. A bit of high nitrogen dry fertilizer will speed it up but also increase growth of vines etc. Anything that keeps the stumps damp helps. Fertilizer both attracts water and the nitrogen feeds the bacteria that speed the process.

Three or four years ago I had 40 acres of pines cut and the stumps cleared about 2 months later. That was a lot of stumps at about 400 trees to the acre and one operator on a large excavator popped almost all of them out of the ground. They were then piled and burned and corn was planted that same year. If the trees had been hardwoods, that wouldn't have been possible.

Treefarmer
 

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When you are tired of fiddling with chemicals and just want the stump GONE.
 

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Garlon rtu (may need license)

triclopyr144 g acid equivalent/L

used by electric companies to suppress vegetation on wire corridors
 

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Any environmental effects to using Tordon? I have a few stumps and I have some wetlands to. I was going to try the epsom salt method but that takes a dozen bags of salt and a few months.
 

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I call "horse hockey!!" on Bob Villa,, he stated that this Epsom salt treatment will "loosen" the stump,,,


"HORSE HOCKEY!!"

:laugh:

I am sure that Epsom salt can help stop the tree from sprouting, but, surely it will do nothing in a couple months to reduce root hold.

I have two locust stumps, that were about 8 inch and 12 inch, DBH,,that I cut in about 1983,,

Over the next 35 years, those stumps have decayed ZERO!!
I shortened one of those stumps last summer with a chainsaw to suit a new mower that I purchased,,
that stump wood was just as strong as the day I cut the tree down,,

I also had an excavator take out a couple other locust stumps that were 30+ years since cutting,,
the excavator struggled like it was a fresh cut stump.

If a stump is gonna decay, especially "in a couple months",, it is not going to be because of a chemical dumped on it,,,
 
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